Golf Club: Wasteland Image
Metascore
79

Generally favorable reviews - based on 10 Critic Reviews What's this?

User Score
6.2

Mixed or average reviews- based on 6 Ratings

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  • Summary: Human life is wiped out. Earth is now a golf course for the ultra-rich. The rich fled to Mars but venture back to a desolate Earth for a round of golf. Each hole in the wasteland offers its own little story and possible puzzle to sink the perfect shot. Play through destroyed brutalistHuman life is wiped out. Earth is now a golf course for the ultra-rich. The rich fled to Mars but venture back to a desolate Earth for a round of golf. Each hole in the wasteland offers its own little story and possible puzzle to sink the perfect shot. Play through destroyed brutalist monuments, crumbling shopping malls, and abandoned museums as neon signs and poignant graffiti take swings at current events, Silicon Valley culture and humanity. Piece together the full story of how humanity fell through three distinct sources. Details from the lone golfer’s story, who's come back to Earth for one last game. The Radio Nostalgia From Mars broadcast that gives a glimpse into the lives of those who escaped. And the narration of a “secret spectator” watching from a distance...Be accompanied by a purposefully composed soundtrack as well as personal stories broadcasted on Radio Nostalgia From Mars. The station caters to citizens of Mars, nostalgic for Earth as they listen to music from the 2020s, and dial in to share their memories of the planet. A smooth-voiced radio DJ keeps the show flowing with updates and announcements hinting at a not-so-glamorous life on Mars. Three distinct modes mean every golfer can find something for their tastes. Casual players can focus just on the story and a relaxing scenic round of golf in Story Mode. Those looking for an extra challenge can beat each hole under par using skill and puzzle solving through Challenge Mode. While the total pros can try Iron Mode, where there’s almost zero room for error. Easy-to grasp controls and a minimalist UI underpin the whole game so anyone can easily pick up and play at their own pace. Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 10
  2. Negative: 0 out of 10
  1. Nov 16, 2021
    90
    Impressively interesting title which takes you golfing in a dystopian wasteland called Earth. While golfing your way through abandoned cities and listening to a Martian radio station, you will discover what had really happened to our once great society. Golf Club Wasteland is using nonlinear storytelling to a great extent and it is a truly amazing experience.
  2. Sep 13, 2021
    85
    Golf Club: Wasteland is a good game but not because of the quality of its actual golfing experience. Putting balls into holes is serviceable. There are some well-designed levels but there are also some frustrating ones. Don’t feel any guilt if you play on Story mode and get as much of the narrative as you can, without bothering with hazards or limits. But the developers at Demagog understand how to create atmosphere and how to let the world tell a story. Radio Nostalgia is an impressive achievement, especially the songs. The team does need to find a game theme and a set of mechanics that allows them to flex their world-building muscles in more expansive ways than Golf Club: Wasteland can.
  3. Sep 17, 2021
    85
    There’s no shortage of story in this golf adventure around a post-apocalyptic wasteland.
  4. Sep 2, 2021
    80
    Golf Club: Wasteland can be seen as a kind of skillful outlet, a highly relaxing experience carried by a peculiar post-apocalyptic vibe and effective minimalist gameplay. In particular, we get an impeccable soundtrack, intelligently alternating between musics and precious testimonials for the scenario context. And if the adventure is short, it is given good replayability.
  5. 75
    In the end, however, Golf Club Wasteland didn’t need to sell me on its main character for it to work. It tells more than a story about one person or one moment. Instead, its strength is in the world it creates, the microstories of each level, and the layers of social critique in each part of its radio broadcasts. The rich will watch the world burn and complain about the glare―best make sure that golf course is shady.
  6. Sep 2, 2021
    72
    Golf Club: Wasteland is a super stylish puzzle-golf game which works better as an interactive drama than a golf game. The shooting system is shallow and brings into the experience too much "trial and error", but the atmosphere, the radio sounds and Charley's meaningful story give a melanchonic and charming dimension to the game.
  7. 60
    Golf Club: Wasteland is a rather standard golf game bolstered by an experimental narrative approach. This iteration is, have no doubt, an improvement on the niche ideas therein, and for that, I applaud the developers. However, good as these ideas are, they suffer from feeling incompatible with each other. Everything is OK, with the distinct sting of feeling like they could have been great, given the right conditions.

See all 11 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 0 out of 2
  2. Negative: 1 out of 2
  1. Oct 3, 2021
    5
    Now here's a game that makes a great case for how to ruin your narrative by including it in a videogame:

    By combining it with a pretty
    Now here's a game that makes a great case for how to ruin your narrative by including it in a videogame:

    By combining it with a pretty terrible golf simulation. While I really like the worldbuilding and the story that is unfolding, and I love the radio station that is playing in the background, it's like reading a nice book... that came with an arbitrary chore that you have to perform before you are allowed to turn the page. Even if that chore was fun and not riddled with terrible controls and cheap physics, why would you put that in your book? There is of course the slightly heavy handed metaphore about how evil and mindless rich people are, but I get it! I got it in the first level. I actually got it in the first 10 seconds of the trailer.

    And yes, it's a very nice metaphore, I wholeheartedly support the politics behind it, but the way it's used here all that's missing is Ben Garrison labeling everything. And while the cartoon apocalypse looks nice, it's not adding anything to the storytelling, since the golf course is taking up the visuals.

    So, what next? Shakespeare as a platformer? They could still turn this into a great comic, so how about that?
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  2. Oct 5, 2021
    2
    A great premise and fantastic presentation, utterly ruined by the worst implementation of controls I've ever seen in a golf game.
    It might as
    A great premise and fantastic presentation, utterly ruined by the worst implementation of controls I've ever seen in a golf game.
    It might as well be a dice roll, if you're using a control pad, as the pitch and power controls (yes, the same basic control scheme you've used in games like Worms and Angry Birds to great effect, for decades) here are deemed to be too easy, so the developer has taken this tried and true system and added random glitching to the controller action to make playing a purposefully vague and frustrating experience, rather than a challenging and rewarding one.
    It's as if, playing Angry Birds, someone was grabbing your arm and shaking it fifty times a second, because they think it all adds to the fun of the experience.
    They are wrong and so is Untold Tales.
    It's a baffling decision to purposefully sabotage a games controls, simply to add difficulty to a game, rather than having better level design, but unfortunately it's also the kind of decision that tells you, no matter how good the overall presentation is, the studio has a bad game designer at the helm, who doesn't really understand the user experience, and who doesn't hold enjoyment as a core principle of a games appeal.
    'If you want an enjoyable game, don't bother with Golf Club: Wasteland, that's not what it's here for.'
    Unfortunately that's a message the developer is transmitting loud and clear, and it's one people looking for fun should heed.
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