User Score
6.1

Mixed or average reviews- based on 76 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 30 out of 76
  2. Negative: 19 out of 76

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  1. Nov 17, 2016
    5
    Nice idea, nice graphics, has a nice flow to it (no pun).
    It's problems are the problems of the genre:
    - Random loot/Locations to visit - Punishing if you don't get lucky though not as bad as some people here make it out to be - No story and very little things to keep you going I like the mechanic that you can carry over items if you die because your dog 'survives' and brings the
    Nice idea, nice graphics, has a nice flow to it (no pun).
    It's problems are the problems of the genre:
    - Random loot/Locations to visit
    - Punishing if you don't get lucky though not as bad as some people here make it out to be
    - No story and very little things to keep you going

    I like the mechanic that you can carry over items if you die because your dog 'survives' and brings the backpack from the last survivor to your next character, but all in all I probably won't play the game anymore. It's fun and quick, but only for so long before it becomes VERY repetitive. And after I died a bit into the game because there was actually a dead end in the river after a camp (which I wasn't able to see before going that way) I became a bit frustrated.

    But to be honest, I'm missing the scope and secrets of don't starve. In FITF I get the feeling that I'm doing a routine every time and do not find anything interesting.
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  2. Jan 16, 2017
    7
    The Flame in the Flood
    hurt by procedural generation
    Flame in the Flood is a rogue like survival game where you play as a woman named scout who’s accompanies by a companion either asop or daisy There are 2 modes here, a campaign mode and an endless modes.. Most of my issues with the game are exclusive to the campaign and are completely forgiven for endless mode… Mostly that in the
    The Flame in the Flood
    hurt by procedural generation
    Flame in the Flood is a rogue like survival game where you play as a woman named scout who’s accompanies by a companion either asop or daisy
    There are 2 modes here, a campaign mode and an endless modes..
    Most of my issues with the game are exclusive to the campaign and are completely forgiven for endless mode…
    Mostly that in the campaign you’re at the mercy of procedural generation…
    you would think this would be a hand crafted and balanced journey down the river while endless mode would offer a randomized challenge… but no.. both are completely random…
    In this game you collect items to use as food, hydration, clothes to keep you warm, items to craft medical supplies and try to make your way down the river through the 10 different regions…
    The challenge is balance…
    Your nutrition drains by the second so you have to carefully choose when to stop at a location or when to keep going…
    Are you desperate for food? Stop at a farm
    sleep deprived or cold? Find a fire and shelter... raft taking too much damage?
    pray you’ve found bolts and wood to repair or upgrade it…
    The problem is this is less about strategy and planning and more of a desperate search for items you need in the moment…
    And again you’re at the mercy of procedural generation…
    There is no balance of supplies.. you aren’t guaranteed to get what you need from stopping at places that typically have those supplies…
    Especially medical supplies…
    MY first playthrough I had none, I had scratches and broken bones from running into enemies like boars and wolves and no way to fix them as I never ran into a drug store or was lucky enough to run into supplies to craft items while in my 2nd playthrough I was swimming in bandages alcohol and crutches…
    I feel this campaign would be miles better if it was more about managing than it was getting lucky…
    Instead the campaign only offers an end goal and a few npc characters to find…
    And if you do get lucky finding tons of food and other supplies it isn’t going to matter as the inventory is a joke…
    Slightly increased by the pack of your companion who also barks near items you can pick up or search as well as your raft…
    But it isn’t nearly enough to feel like you’re doing anything more than scrounging…
    All of this would’ve been fine in the endless mode as its own thing…
    But a campaign with no balance and just as luck based is a problem…
    Poor campaign mode but as a survival game its beautiful to look at and a pretty decent challenge…
    I give The Flame in the Flood
    a 7/10
    Expand
  3. Aug 15, 2017
    7
    nice drawn graphics
    very nice soundtrack
    easy to process

    but the skills to survive are sometimes more based on lucky or randomness
    and sometimes the game is seems more like only a gestrion/looting game
  4. Mar 17, 2016
    5
    Neat idea, terrible execution. It's a very refreshing take on survival game where rater than trying to survive in open world, you're trying to travel down a river on your raft, while visiting locations along the river for supplies. Game also has quite robust crafting system with multiple tools and crafting materials. Sounds great, right? Problem is - locations you'll get to visit areNeat idea, terrible execution. It's a very refreshing take on survival game where rater than trying to survive in open world, you're trying to travel down a river on your raft, while visiting locations along the river for supplies. Game also has quite robust crafting system with multiple tools and crafting materials. Sounds great, right? Problem is - locations you'll get to visit are entirely random and there is no telling what you might find, and you can't go back since river flows only one way. So many times you'll start game, go trough several locations and parts of the river, and de before finding basic materials to craft even most basic tool. Game is difficult and punishing, and it's not bad. But thanks to randomness of resources there is no interaction with the game - you just collect everything and move on, hoping that at next spot you'll actually get something you need. If you don't mind game so heavily based around RNG, by all means, go for it, it's quite interesting. But in my opinion all interesting parts of this cool game gets drowned out by it's randomness, Expand
  5. Jun 13, 2018
    7
    7/10
    It has some minor bugs but is a decent game. It has its own mood but doesn't offer anything more.
  6. Mar 5, 2019
    5
    The artwork(artstyle) of this game is amazing! and the soundtrack is also pretty good, but the execution of the game is atrocious! It involves too much grinding and too much based on RNG. The fact that the player can't even bind keys is pretty bad.
  7. Feb 5, 2020
    6
    Good concept, but too hard and based on luck. It is not worth investing energy in this game.
  8. May 13, 2020
    7
    A decent survival game but it feels very unfair at times. With less RNG this game could've been great.
Metascore
73

Mixed or average reviews - based on 43 Critic Reviews

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 21 out of 43
  2. Negative: 0 out of 43
  1. CD-Action
    May 30, 2016
    70
    An experienced traveler will deal with the campaign in 2 hours tops, but gathering experience in a series of adventures in a randomly generated world is the most enjoyable thing here. The moments of triumph and fear that you will experience along the way are reasons enough to give this game a chance despite its many (but not severe) technical issues. [05/2016, p.42]
  2. Apr 28, 2016
    70
    The Flame in The Flood can be seen as a novel of formation nestled in a methapore that turns life into a river. Unfortunately Molasses Flood's first work tries to transmit a deep and manifold message with a not so deep and manifold messenger.
  3. Games Master UK
    Apr 25, 2016
    75
    An impressive shake-up of survival tropes - but dedicated fans of the genre may be left wanting. [Apr 2016, p.74]