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67

Mixed or average reviews - based on 12 Critics What's this?

User Score
4.8

Generally unfavorable reviews- based on 8 Ratings

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  • Summary: In the final days of the Inverse, you must help the Archaeologist recover the last remaining memories before they are lost forever. Fly through ancient skies and abandoned oceans to discover the lost history of this fading realm, where entire civilizations have died, yet their gods stillIn the final days of the Inverse, you must help the Archaeologist recover the last remaining memories before they are lost forever. Fly through ancient skies and abandoned oceans to discover the lost history of this fading realm, where entire civilizations have died, yet their gods still wander. In InnerSpace, gravity pulls outward instead of in. InnerSpace began as a project among college friends and evolved into a successful Kickstarter campaign in 2014. After years of development, PolyKnight is proud to welcome you to the Inverse. Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 12
  2. Negative: 0 out of 12
  1. 90
    InnerSpace is a game that you should be playing. The well-realized worlds, exceptional aesthetic and compelling exploration mechanics complement each other tremendously well. If you can get past the occasional bout of unnecessary complex exposition, the evolution of each environment tells a compelling enough story to keep you enthralled from start to finish. Drop everything and check out what deserves to be one of the sleeper hits of 2018.
  2. Jan 24, 2018
    80
    It's a bit brief and the controls are lacking, but don't let that keep you from giving InnerSpace a shot. It's a relaxing experience with a unique, colourful style, that really makes it stick out from the pack.
  3. Jan 16, 2018
    78
    Good atmosphere between music and silence. A brief dream about flying and diving.
  4. Jan 16, 2018
    65
    Wonderfully inventive, InnerSpace is a very interesting game. Although it is regrettably missing something to keep the players coming back, it is a lovely, gentle, and relaxing game.
  5. Jan 18, 2018
    65
    InnerSpace is a visually stunning game that ultimately fails to connect. It wants the player to explore and uncover its secrets, but places them in an environment that is deliberately confusing to the point of frustration.
  6. Playstation Official Magazine UK
    Feb 26, 2018
    60
    The flying is pleasant, if a little dull and the inverted world is fascinating to see in motion but it's no nearly enough. [March 2018, p.93]
  7. Feb 19, 2019
    50
    InnerSpace is beautiful... and that's all there is to say about it, because, as much as exploration games go, there are far better alternatives out there - with none of them feeling as disorienting as this one.

See all 12 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 3
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 3
  3. Negative: 0 out of 3
  1. Jan 17, 2018
    9
    InnerSpace is a gorgeous and enthralling experience. The closes parallels you can draw between it and another game would be the ambient colorInnerSpace is a gorgeous and enthralling experience. The closes parallels you can draw between it and another game would be the ambient color scheme and pacing of Journey with the quirky narrative settings of an N64 game and gameplay elements almost uniquely it's own.

    The team at Polyknight have crafted a game that is full of awe inspiring moments as you traverse each maps inverse bubble-map. The gameplay focuses on exploration, and it tends not to hold your hand, allowing you to solve where to go next and figure out how to solve each puzzle organically.

    The sound design is soothing and enjoyable-I particularly enjoyed the character voices. The art direction is beautiful as well-organic creatures are juxtaposed against ancient crumbling textures that breathe a lot of life into each world. Each map is unique, and consists of varied gameplay elements as well as a unique visual style.

    The game evoked a lot of my favorite moments from Saturn classics like Nights into Dreams and Panzer Dragoon. It marches to its own beat, and stays consistent tonally throughout. Flying takes a bit of getting used to initially, but once you learn the physics you'll traverse tight passages with ease, drifting and shifting directions on the turn of a dime. Some of my favorite moments where high speed bursts down narrow corridors, twisting and turning to cut cables, or chasing luminescent butterflies.

    Exploration is rewarded with relics, which simultaneously bolster the game's lore, are interactable, and occasionally reward you with a new airframe, changing up the gameplay.

    All in all I really enjoyed my time with InnerSpace. It's a unique game that aims for the stars, and when it really gets going I feel like it achieves everything it set out to do. It's a visual and aural feast, and well worth picking up.
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  2. Jan 17, 2018
    8
    Flight done right.
    This unique take on flight focuses on exploration and intrigue in this very original game. Certain aspects are a little
    Flight done right.
    This unique take on flight focuses on exploration and intrigue in this very original game. Certain aspects are a little simplistic but what it does do, it shines bright. The discovery of 'relics' even have their own little mini games as well as even the load screen having a little extra touch added to it.
    Everything in this game screams "done with love" and you can't help but feel it. The core element, the flying, is great. The basics are intuitive but there are a few extra features like diving and drifting that make it engaging to master.
    Looking forward to playing more of it.
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  3. Jan 17, 2018
    8
    Every now and then a game comes out that creates a sense of calm within you. It’s not often I’m playing something that will keep me relaxed asEvery now and then a game comes out that creates a sense of calm within you. It’s not often I’m playing something that will keep me relaxed as my wife is stressing out over our pregnancy, as we are just a few weeks away from birth. Even rarer is a game that does that and instills a sense of accomplishment at the same time. And yet, PolyKnight Games nails both of those feelings while you have to put forth little effort.

    When I think of flying in games, it’s either something so effortless and natural like the recent AER, or something that feels so unpolished and painful you don’t want to play like the much less enjoyable Oure. In this case, we’ll be somewhere between the two with a persuasion toward the former, with a bit of underwater travel for good measure. But rest assured that everything works how you’d expect in InnerSpace.

    The game starts with a bit of lore, and is then followed by a tutorial that will teach you all the basics you’ll need for your exploration. Once you’re given control in the world of the Inverse, you’ll be treated to an assortment of environments that are almost reminiscent of M.C. Escher as you twist and turn while the environment does the same and always appears to be right side up (or upside down). Luckily, the game doesn’t make you wander aimlessly, as it provides little way-point type launchers for you to stop and get your bearings. These provide a way to look around without the pressure of the controls to see if there are any collectibles nearby, or perhaps something in the environment you can interact with. If there’s nothing, you can at least fly to the next one of these points with ease. But I recommend flying about and finding things naturally, as you’re bound to see a glowing light that will guide your attention.

    The colors used in the game are absolutely extraordinary, and the way they work with the environment and soundtrack means they serve a much greater purpose than solely looking different from the other offerings on your preferred online game store. In addition to flying, you’ll be swimming after collecting one of the initial relics. As you progress through the game you’ll come across many relics that not only serve as storytelling devices, but ways to improve your abilities while traversing the different parts of the Inverse you unlock. The relics are handled in a way you may expect from a walking simulator, but in a much more user friendly way. Instead of simply allowing you to inspect a 3D modeled object, you’re walked through a set of steps and animations that are ultimately much more interesting than the normal pick up and rotate mechanic that has become commonplace.

    On top of relics, you’ll be able to collect wind, which is much easier to come by than relics. Wind serves as the main collectible in the game, and will allow you to use the relics you come across, which means further progression of the game. The amount needed is never more than you’d probably obtain from general exploration, so you won’t have to worry about grinding out the acquisition of these collectibles like you would with experience in an RPG.

    Something you may not expect from a general exploration game that involves some minor puzzle solving as you move about the environment would be the bosses you encounter. Calling these encounters “boss fights” may be a bit much, as these often just involve flying into certain things at the right time, or chasing something for a period of time, but they break up the gameplay nonetheless and give something unique to each level you come across. The levels also make use of sound cues depending on where you are in the environment and what’s going on – the general swelling feeling of it would make anyone feel excited as something big is about to happen.

    Since this game is pretty much all about flying or swimming, the game needs to perfect those mechanics. While they seem solid initially, you’ll soon find yourself running into walls and sand and whatever else the level has as you try to collect everything and destroy each of the breakable objects. Now this could certainly be worse, as the game does a good job of getting you out of those situations quickly, but the nature of the levels often leaves you confused as to where you are once you’re past it, and you need to get your bearings again. I also found myself struggling with flight after certain upgrades; you’d think this would be the opposite in a game where you’re making your vehicle better.

    With beautiful scenery, lots to collect, and a good amount of lore to take in, InnerSpace is a wonderful little title if you’re looking for something to kick back with at the end of a hard day and relax. Perhaps most impressive is that this is PolyKnight Games’ first professional title. Having a debut like this, we can’t wait to see what they do next.
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