User Score
5.3

Mixed or average reviews- based on 65 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 31 out of 65
  2. Negative: 27 out of 65
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  1. Jan 23, 2019
    8
    As a lifelong fan of the series and rating the 'Genma' Onimusha port of this game on the original Xbox as one of my favourite games of all time, I can say this PS4 edition has more than a few shortcomings albeit a great experience and joy to play.

    My first gripe is the lack of a simple skip implementation to the cutscenes, which would've enhanced the overall flow of gameplay - it feels
    As a lifelong fan of the series and rating the 'Genma' Onimusha port of this game on the original Xbox as one of my favourite games of all time, I can say this PS4 edition has more than a few shortcomings albeit a great experience and joy to play.

    My first gripe is the lack of a simple skip implementation to the cutscenes, which would've enhanced the overall flow of gameplay - it feels like a chore having to repeatedly revisit a cutscene which takes place before a challenging sequence or boss fight that resulted in your death. This is a game that begs for your full attention and so there is a certain rhythm to the gameplay that is lost having to re-watch cutscenes every time you screw up.

    Newcomers might argue that tank controls are a little outdated and thankfully, the developers foresaw this issue implementing the option to use the left analog stick for movement. I personally feel the strafe mechanics of the game are clearly designed around the use of the D-pad which allows for flawless control of Samanosuke during combat.

    Fixed camera angles are what help define the atmosphere and much like in early Resident Evil titles, the claustrophobic nature of set pieces are a constant reminder that danger lurks around every corner and enemies will be sure to mow you down if your guard isn’t up. Understandably so, here this can seen as a negative, as enemies can potentially pin you to the corners of the screen, overwhelming you as a result which can feel like bad game design. Nevertheless, it’s a minor detail when compared to the overall fluidity of combat as the controls feel especially responsive for a game that requires split second reaction timing in the heat of battle.

    As for visuals, the graphics are what are to be expected from a 2001 release being upscaled for the PS4. Granted, it hasn’t aged as well as other remasters of the sort, and despite the evident pre-rendered background contrasts, what takes centre stage in Onimusha has always been the gameplay, and let’s not forget - this is an 18 year old PS2 game.

    Whilst the action is definitely one of the better strengths of Onimusha, there is also great pacing between solving puzzles, finding chests and deciphering secrets which are plentifully and cleverly scattered throughout the course of the game. You’ll often come across locked doors each with their respective seals giving the player incentive to backtrack to earlier sections once they’ve upgraded their arsenal. Some areas, whilst not all too clearly represented in the game’s lootable maps, could easily be missed during an initial playthrough providing replay value for completionists and trophy hunters alike. In addition to this, an Ultimate difficulty mode becomes available once you have completed the game on any difficulty.

    Given, this is a retouch of the PS2 version of Onimusha, but the aforementioned Genma edition introduced so many new features which, in my opinion, elevated the game’s quality and replay value drastically.
    There was a much higher level of challenge with the inclusion of tougher enemies, bosses and areas to beat. More notably so, were the combat additions which granted players the ability to perform charged attacks and absorb Green Souls -rendering Samanosuke invincible for a short time. These were welcome features which balanced out a heightened level of difficulty by providing a much needed edge when encountering deadlier enemies.
    Exploration, whilst still very present in this PS4 remaster, was also more rewarding in Genma, with more treasures & challenges to seek out and master such as the unforgiving Ogre Tower - an optional detour to the main narrative, where players could test their durability against unrelenting hordes of demons. Luckily, the similar yet inferior Dark Realm segment, also included in Genma, is available in this remaster.

    Hardcore fanatics (myself included) will rejoice at the re-recorded japanese dialogue hidden in the options menu behind the god-awful english dubbed version.
    An all new beautiful score has also been composed in replacement of the original. While it’s a worthy tribute, it makes one wonder what lead them to re-compose what was an already masterful and beloved soundtrack. Compositions like ’Samanosuke’s Theme’, ‘Gale’ or ‘Waterfall Mountain’ amongst other classic and memorable tunes are completely missing which in my humble opinion, really set the tone in Onimusha, making the journey all the more worthwhile.

    Ultimately, I believe this reworked remaster of an absolute classic still delivers today and however much I wish that Capcom would’ve given us a more wholesome game to enjoy, what's left is a gratifying and treasured experience for both old and new audiences willing to play.
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  2. Jan 16, 2019
    8
    The game has surely aged but it did so very gracefully. There are some things that could have been added to it to make it more enjoyable, like skippable cutscenes or the content from Genma Onimusha but none of this distracts from the fact that this game was and is still a very enjoyable experience.
    The biggest new addition to the game are the analogue controls that can be a bit of a two
    The game has surely aged but it did so very gracefully. There are some things that could have been added to it to make it more enjoyable, like skippable cutscenes or the content from Genma Onimusha but none of this distracts from the fact that this game was and is still a very enjoyable experience.
    The biggest new addition to the game are the analogue controls that can be a bit of a two edged sword, on the one hand it can make moving around and avoiding attacks from enemies much easier and faster but on the other hand the constantr camera changes can really mess with this style of controls. Overall it works fine, it just needs some getting used to.
    Graphically it still looks like a game from 2001 with upscaled resolution and 16:9 aspect ratio, not much else to say here, what you see is what you get.
    One big change to the game however is the soundtrack which was completely changed from its original score, this is obviously highly subjective on whether or not you like the new soundtrack, personally I really enjpoyed the new one, it fits right in with the game and sometimes surpasses the original.
    Combat still feels great, attacks are weighty giving a really satisfying sense of impact, dodging can be a bit iffy with the new control scheme however.
    For level design, it's basically Resident Evil 1, you are in a big house and need to find your way around it to get where you need to go, so lots of backtracking is involved, however that is not a bad thing here. The game does a really good job at givng you directions and even if you get lost, going around the place improves your familiarity with it until you know the castle like the back of you hand. It gpoes a long way to make Ianabayama castle feel like a real place rather than just a series of corridors.
    So in conclusion, you can do a whole lot worse for 20$. Recommended.
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  3. Jan 15, 2019
    10
    Of course its not a 10 game, but hell I wanted to play onimusha again so much, that I am giving it higher score than it deserves (its about 6,5/10 game) because I want more from this series.
    The question I have is why Capcom decided to port only the first title instead of trilogy OR Onimusha: Dawn of Dreams? This series was getting better with each new part so either 3 or DoD would be
    Of course its not a 10 game, but hell I wanted to play onimusha again so much, that I am giving it higher score than it deserves (its about 6,5/10 game) because I want more from this series.
    The question I have is why Capcom decided to port only the first title instead of trilogy OR Onimusha: Dawn of Dreams? This series was getting better with each new part so either 3 or DoD would be perfect for newcomers or to scratch nostalgia itch. Well, its a bit shame because DoD looks better than this "remaster" and DoD was released in 2006...
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  4. Jan 15, 2019
    9
    It's a good game and a good portage. It's onimusha, the resident evil like, but with a katana in japan.
  5. Jan 18, 2019
    7
    Onimusha is just as I remember it back in 2001, and at the time, it was one of the most impressive action games ever. Unfortunately time has not been too kind on it. Even though the graphics have held up really well, the gameplay suffers. This is mainly due to the horrible fixed camera angles.

    Don't get me wrong, it's still a very playable game, even still enjoyable throughout most
    Onimusha is just as I remember it back in 2001, and at the time, it was one of the most impressive action games ever. Unfortunately time has not been too kind on it. Even though the graphics have held up really well, the gameplay suffers. This is mainly due to the horrible fixed camera angles.

    Don't get me wrong, it's still a very playable game, even still enjoyable throughout most parts. I was just hoping it would feel more like a remaster rather than a basic port with upscaled graphics. I do think $20 is a fairly reasonable asking price, but I'm glad it's no higher than that, as it only takes around 4 hours to play through it thoroughly.
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  6. Jan 16, 2019
    8
    A well-established title that started with one of the best franchises, especially for the PS2 console owners, but today, the PS4 console, and a remix that could be better than that.
  7. Jan 30, 2019
    10
    I want you to bear in mind this is one of the first game from the playstation 2 catalogue before reviewing this game.

    -The series originates in Yoshiki Okamoto's 1997 idea to create Sengoku Biohazard, a ninja version of Capcom's own 1996 Resident Evil (known as Biohazard in Japan), set in the Sengoku period and featuring a "ninja house" filled with Booby traps, similar to the mansion
    I want you to bear in mind this is one of the first game from the playstation 2 catalogue before reviewing this game.

    -The series originates in Yoshiki Okamoto's 1997 idea to create Sengoku Biohazard, a ninja version of Capcom's own 1996 Resident Evil (known as Biohazard in Japan), set in the Sengoku period and featuring a "ninja house" filled with Booby traps, similar to the mansion from Resident Evil, where battles would be fought using swords and shuriken: "The house will contain hidden doors behind walls, ceilings that fall down to you, scrolls and ninja magic, and many other ninja techniques." The project was originally intended for the Nintendo 64's 64DD.

    Onimusha: Warlords was originally being developed for the original PlayStation, but the project was eventually moved to the PlayStation 2. The half-finished original PlayStation version of Onimusha was then scrapped and never released.-

    Pros:
    +This version has fixed the stale controls, you no longer walk like Resident Evil 1/2/3 or Silent Hill 1 from the playstation one era.
    +The graphics were also greatly improved, especially the face models.
    +The game runs at 60 fps in all consoles , the switch version is no different.

    Cons:
    -The original game has a horrible voice acting and the story is really generic and stupid. (There is no way to fix that)
    -The game is very stale for this era, even after all the fixes and that is why lots of new players will prefer to pick anything else instead of this tittle.

    What makes onimusha series great is how they develop the story of japan with the genma and magic in the middle.

    That supernatural and fantastic part of this series is what makes it great.

    Onimusha series is more oriented to the action genre, instead of the horror and survival from the Resident Evil series.

    The series became great from the 3rd game onwards, when they stopped developing this horror/survival side and improved the action side of the series.

    *Play this game if you want to see where everything began on the Onimusha universe.

    *If you already played this then you will surely enjoy this again as the fixes really make a difference.

    Onimusha 3 and Onimusha: Dawn of Dreams are the best this series has to offer, but for that we need to support this game, so they can make an HD collection or even work on the remaining tittles.
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  8. Jan 16, 2019
    8
    I am not capable of reviewing this without my nostalgia goggles firmly on my face, but this is a great remaster, it plays fantastically, and it still feels very good. Keep 'em coming Capcom, I won't be truly satisfied until I can play Onimusha 3: A Day In Paris With Jean Reno.
  9. Feb 5, 2019
    7
    Mit vier episch inszenierten PS2-Teilen gehörte Onimusha einst zu den wichtigsten Capcom-Serien – in Teil 3 spielte gar ein adäquat-digitalisierter Jean Reno mit. Im Gegensatz zum Hack’n’Slash-Kollegen Devil May Cry jedoch hat man von Held Samanosuke und Gegenspieler Nobunaga seit Jahren nichts mehr gehört. Bis jetzt! Einen neuen Ableger des Semi-Survival-Horrors gibt es zwar nicht, dafürMit vier episch inszenierten PS2-Teilen gehörte Onimusha einst zu den wichtigsten Capcom-Serien – in Teil 3 spielte gar ein adäquat-digitalisierter Jean Reno mit. Im Gegensatz zum Hack’n’Slash-Kollegen Devil May Cry jedoch hat man von Held Samanosuke und Gegenspieler Nobunaga seit Jahren nichts mehr gehört. Bis jetzt! Einen neuen Ableger des Semi-Survival-Horrors gibt es zwar nicht, dafür immerhin eine HD-Neuauflage des Erstlings für so ziemlich alle Systeme – und die ist gar nicht mal schlecht! Die vorgerenderten Hintergründe und schlichten Charaktermodelle sind zwar trotz neuer Schärfe spürbar oldschool, dafür funktioniert der ganze Rest auch heute noch – fiese, weil keine Checkpoints und nicht abbrechbare Zwischensequenzen mal ausgenommen. Die Kämpfe von Onimusha Warlords sind dank der angepassten Analogstick-Steuerung deutlich flotter als beim klassischen Resident Evil, selbst eine Waffenschnellauswahl gibt es. Außerdem rocken das unverbrauchte Samurai-Setting nebst historischer Story genauso wie die abwechslungsreichen Puzzles. Nur für Capcom-Nostalgie muss man natürlich etwas übrig haben. Expand
  10. Jan 21, 2019
    7
    A remaster of the classic PS2 game that offers little beyond the upscaled graphics. A widescreen format, new musical score and analog controls are now included. Everything else is now the same as it was in the original title. Initially a 2001 release, the gameplay of Onimusha Warlords is quite dated. Unfortunately, you cannot skip cutscenes and sadly there are no new features. I wishA remaster of the classic PS2 game that offers little beyond the upscaled graphics. A widescreen format, new musical score and analog controls are now included. Everything else is now the same as it was in the original title. Initially a 2001 release, the gameplay of Onimusha Warlords is quite dated. Unfortunately, you cannot skip cutscenes and sadly there are no new features. I wish Capcom would've included artwork, extra costumes and perhaps the Xbox version of the game, Genma Onimusha. But as it is, this is a pretty basic remaster. It's fun and can be seen as the granddaddy of Dark Souls. However, there are many things that feel archaic such as the fixed camera angles and enemy respawns. Overall, this is still an enjoyable hack n' slash in the vein of Resident Evil. I would rate it with a 7.5 out of 10. Expand
  11. Jan 27, 2019
    7
    Capcom is running out of games to re-release, so they decided to dig a bit deep of the early days of the PS2 with Onimusha Warlords. I could not be happier I have some nostalgia for this game that childhood me was just terrible at and adult me was good enough to finish in basically a sitting, but I’ll get into why it is so short.

    The story you follow Samanonsuke (yes, I had to look up
    Capcom is running out of games to re-release, so they decided to dig a bit deep of the early days of the PS2 with Onimusha Warlords. I could not be happier I have some nostalgia for this game that childhood me was just terrible at and adult me was good enough to finish in basically a sitting, but I’ll get into why it is so short.

    The story you follow Samanonsuke (yes, I had to look up how to spell this very Japanese name) he is a samurai who is on a quest to stop these demons and save the princess. It is a very straight forward story with a bunch of lore sprinkled in if you want to read it all. The voice acting is bad, and I mean it is a really bad dub. Think of Resident Evil (PS1) style of Jill- sandwich level of lines and delivery. In a weird way though it does give this game some level of charm. The game as I mentioned is short. You can fly through the story in less than 3 hours. If you do the game will award you with a trophy so it is something they noticed.

    Speaking of how the game plays it is a hack and slasher but slower combat then maybe one would be used to. Since you can use the analog stick combat is easier then what it used to be. When I had to switch to a character that I don’t get XP for I would just run around enemies. Now the puzzles are what can be a pain. Only because the puzzles vary from do this pattern to open a box of goodies to if you fail you die. Being that Onimusha is an old school game it has some old school features. The biggest one is that if you die you must restart at the last time you save. You can only save at designated points. It also has this annoying thing that the only way to get through certain doors is to level up your magic globes, which is fine except that it takes away from your XP to level up your weapons. This isn’t the worst thing, but if you want all the weapons leveled up you need to grind the enemies that come back every time you leave the room.

    Overall the game is great if you used to be a fan, it is a wonderful trip down memory lane. As for those who never heard of the series or weren’t into it during the PS2 days I would say skip this game for sure. The voice acting is bad, and the graphics aren’t improved that much. They basically don’t hurt your eyes anymore. The combat is fun, but it is basically jam on square the game. I like it but I feel that I am a bit bias, but at a $20 price point I would give it a BARGAIN BIN. This will go on sale for even cheaper when it is the price of a song get it only if you have some memory of this in the past. If you’re in the other camp maybe just avoid it all together.
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  12. Jan 21, 2019
    8
    Onimusha Warlords holds an extraordinary place in my heart based on my love of samurai lore and PS1/PS2 Capcom products. With that out of the way, I still think that Onimusha holds up as a bite-sized gaming experience. First of all the story is fun action movie schlock. Think of how Capcom handled horror for Resident Evil (RE), the same can be said for Onimusha and samurai films. Over theOnimusha Warlords holds an extraordinary place in my heart based on my love of samurai lore and PS1/PS2 Capcom products. With that out of the way, I still think that Onimusha holds up as a bite-sized gaming experience. First of all the story is fun action movie schlock. Think of how Capcom handled horror for Resident Evil (RE), the same can be said for Onimusha and samurai films. Over the top, terrible but excellent voice acting, and streamlined narrative with little to no deviations.

    The gameplay is still top-notch, and the sword switching and magic are fun to mess around with during combat. The ranged weapons (bows and muskets) are set up like traditional RE games with L1 reading the gun and another to shoot. This is great in RE, but for Onimusha, where the action is quick and punishing, it can be bothersome. I did not use any ranged weapons until I was forced to do so.

    The "remaster" ing is very light, and the game shows its age. The cutscenes and backgrounds all look pixelated and were not optimized. While very impressive for the time they show age and the remastering might as well be an upscaled backward compatible version.

    TL:DR: Overall the game is still entertaining to play but is not a lengthy experience. The action is fun, fluid, and unique to Onimusha. The campaign is cheesy in the best ways, and the upgrades for the remaster are borderline non-existent. For $20 bucks though its great to have Onimusha on a new console. I hope this means the series is back.
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Metascore
74

Mixed or average reviews - based on 24 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 15 out of 24
  2. Negative: 1 out of 24
  1. Playstation Official Magazine UK
    Feb 12, 2019
    80
    Playing fast and loose with historical fact, Onimusha: Warlords remains a PlayStation classic. Even some of its questionable design choices can’t dampen the fun. [Issue#159, p.92]
  2. Feb 8, 2019
    60
    The first Onimusha is a classic game, no doubt about that, but this edition, unlike Resident Evil 2, is not a remake but the original version with slight upgrades and enhances that are not capable of hiding the fact that the first adventure of Samanosuke has aged poorly.
  3. Feb 3, 2019
    71
    Important classic from the early Playstation 2 era, which is no longer up to date, but has a great atmosphere.