Legends of Amberland: The Forgotten Crown Image
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  • Summary: Embark on an epic fantasy fairy tale adventure in Amberland, a place full of mythical creatures, with your party of noble heroes ready to do heroic quests and fight the forces of evil. Nostalgia strikes true with this 90s-inspired, old-school, western RPG dungeon crawler in which you commandEmbark on an epic fantasy fairy tale adventure in Amberland, a place full of mythical creatures, with your party of noble heroes ready to do heroic quests and fight the forces of evil. Nostalgia strikes true with this 90s-inspired, old-school, western RPG dungeon crawler in which you command a party of up to seven characters. Its grid-and-90-degree-rotation-based movement system evokes the classics of dungeon crawler genre. The game tells many little stories, that help make it's vast, open world feel very much alive.

    The larger story revolves around the player's party of heroes (custom or pre-made) and their search for a relic of days past - the Amber Crown - an object allowing its wearer to control a great power, cursed by evil forces to be forgotten, erased from history. It supposedly belongs to the ruling king by birthright, and with the ongoing Ogre invasion, is something the kingdom desperately needs to survive the onslaught.
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 2
  2. Negative: 0 out of 2
  1. May 27, 2020
    80
    Although it pays strict homage to a bygone era of first-person dungeon crawlers, almost to a fault, Legends of Amberland: The Forgotten Crown still feels fresh and exciting. The experience almost seems tailor-made for the Nintendo Switch.
  2. 60
    Legends of Amberland succeeds in capturing the appeal of those old Gold Box-era RPGs from SSI and their ilk. This was my childhood growing up and as such much of what the game offered fit like a particularly comfortable and well-worn glove. Unfortunately, the developer also decided that for whatever reason the game would have every issue from the RPGs of yesteryear as well, and it's an odd thing for a developer to do - capture the same aesthetics and rhythms of retro games, fine, but why go to all the effort to also emulate all the flaws that the genre has moved on from for good reason?