Path of Sin: Greed Image
Metascore
  1. First Review
  2. Second Review
  3. Third Review
  4. Fourth Review

No score yet - based on 0 Critic Reviews Awaiting 4 more reviews What's this?

User Score
tbd

No user score yet- Awaiting 2 more ratings

Your Score
0 out of 10
Rate this:
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1
  • 0
  • 0
  • Summary: A rookie inspector on her first assignment and her experienced copartner arrive at the scene -- a luxurious island in the middle of the ocean owned by a young millionaire, who wants the matter concluded as quietly as possible. The question in this case appears simple enough: was a securityA rookie inspector on her first assignment and her experienced copartner arrive at the scene -- a luxurious island in the middle of the ocean owned by a young millionaire, who wants the matter concluded as quietly as possible. The question in this case appears simple enough: was a security guard's death a suicidal plunge, or maybe an unfortunate fall? The residents of the island -- the Bradford family -- at first seem cordial and beyond reproach, even shocked by the death of a friendly employee. But upon closer inspection it becomes clear that they harbor animosities and deep hidden motives. The more you delve into this secluded island and the twisted family relations on it, the more complicated and unclear the matter becomes. A seemingly routine case turns into a tale of machinations driven by greed and a suicide investigation reveals multiple murders. Is anyone innocent? Will you be able to predict the assassin's next step? Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 0 out of
  2. Mixed: 0 out of
  3. Negative: 0 out of
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 2
  2. Negative: 0 out of 2
  1. May 30, 2020
    8
    Path of Sin: Greed is basically a point-and-click game with puzzles. Hidden-object puzzles are particularly common, and a variety of otherPath of Sin: Greed is basically a point-and-click game with puzzles. Hidden-object puzzles are particularly common, and a variety of other puzzle types round it out.

    What I really liked is that where most point-and-click games try to extend your play-time by making you run around all over the map, back and forth many times, you don't have to do that here. You can, if you want. But if you play in the easy mode, you can jump directly to any room on the map, and -- even better -- the map shows which rooms have something that you can accomplish at the moment. So when you collect a new object, you can check the map and jump directly to the room where it's useful.

    I found the hint mechanism to be excellent, too, the few times I needed it. I didn't have any need to find a walk-through on the web, which for me is extremely unusual. I'm afraid I don't have the patience to spend hours trying to get past a certain sticking point.

    So, okay. What I liked most is it wasn't too hard. The game didn't leave me hung out to dry for hours at a time, with only my own limited wits to figure out how to make progress. And it didn't make me jump through hoops just to slow me down. If you like your games hard, there is a harder difficulty setting that makes the map much less helpful.

    The game mechanics tripped me up a few times until I finally caught on. During the investigation, you're gathering clues (of course). So here's the thing: at any given time, you're mainly trying to answer one question, shown in the "unfiled" category. In the beginning, for example, it's "what happened to the dead guy." You need to sort the clues into ones that help answer that question and ones that help answer different questions like "who" and "why." Once you have all the clues for one question, that answer gets "filed" and you can move on to the next question.

    When you've gathered all of the clues for the current question, but haven't yet sorted them, there's an indication in the bottom left corner of the screen. But here's a quirky thing... until you get the clues sorted and filed, the map will show there's something to be done in whatever room you're currently in. But it's not the room that needs attention, it's your clue collection.

    A similar thing happens when you can combine two objects in your possession. A green plus sign appears in the lower-right corner of the screen, and with the object in your inventory. And the map will show there's something to be done in whatever room you're in.

    The Switch version includes a follow-on investigation, which isn't as long as the primary one but still is substantial.
    Expand
  2. Aug 15, 2020
    7
    I've never been a huge fan of point and click adventure games but I definitely wanted to. I hadn't played a game like this since I was a kidI've never been a huge fan of point and click adventure games but I definitely wanted to. I hadn't played a game like this since I was a kid in the 90s. Path of Sin: Greed was a nice reintroduction to the genre. My expectations were exceeded, but they were also low.
    I like the ability to fast travel between areas and I like how the hint system can be on or off depending on how hard you want it to be. Luckily, finding objects and their solutions wasn't terribly taxing (like the solution wasn't terribly convoluted), but eventually I got to a point where I'd enter a room and try every object until something opened.

    I may try to play this game again in the future, but the story was your basic "someone got murdered who done it" kind of deal. Don't expect a groundbreaking conclusion.
    Expand