Netflix | Release Date: October 7, 2016
7.8
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 129 Ratings
USER RATING DISTRIBUTION
Positive:
104
Mixed:
9
Negative:
16
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10
DinahOct 16, 2016
Watching this movie should be a duty for Americans. White Americans need to see how the country has persecuted black people for political, financial, and psychological reasons.
4 of 5 users found this helpful41
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8
ranjan04rajeevJan 5, 2017
the content of is great, not the best documentary direction. but overall the film is worth a watch. Its about USA's prison system, how they are run by corporate giants to make money, and how the racial discrimination has taken a new form.
2 of 3 users found this helpful21
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0
JcondicNov 21, 2016
For anyone who has no idea what “Black Lives Matter” stands for this is the film to see. Everything you need to know is given to you. The film has an electrifying pulse as it moves from decade to decade. For me the first half of theFor anyone who has no idea what “Black Lives Matter” stands for this is the film to see. Everything you need to know is given to you. The film has an electrifying pulse as it moves from decade to decade. For me the first half of the documentary felt like a rehash of things I’ve already seen in other documentaries or essays I’ve read. Yet I’ve never seen them grouped together so well in one place. The second half is where I found the biggest punch especially when we get to the last 10 years or so. This is a powerful documentary but to understand where we’ve gotten you have to see how the issue has been evolving underneath our noses. Expand
2 of 3 users found this helpful21
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4
mace8704Oct 22, 2016
13th blurs the line between an advocacy film presenting a specific perspective that goes unchallenged, and an honest historical account of the transition to mass incarceration in the United States. Personally, I was hoping for a strictly13th blurs the line between an advocacy film presenting a specific perspective that goes unchallenged, and an honest historical account of the transition to mass incarceration in the United States. Personally, I was hoping for a strictly historical account, but when push comes to shove, the documentary clearly chooses to be an advocacy film that runs loose with the facts. Allow me to give you one very specific example. At 33 minutes into the film, the documentary is discussing how George Bush used crime and rape to appeal to white voters. At 33:29, he states, "Never mind the fact that the history of interracial rape in this country. That record is far more marked by white rape against black women than of black men against white women." The documentary then cuts to the rape scene from the film 12 Years a Slave.... Not a presentation of crime statistics from that year...a rape scene from a film about slavery. The assertion that interracial rape is disproportionately white men raping black women is simply not backed in any way by the FBI's Uniform Crime Report which is available free to anyone who can be bothered to Google: Interracial rape statistics + FBI. Is denying the existence of racial disparities in violent the best way to tackle violent crime? I have my doubts, but it appears many critics don't. You very well may still enjoy the film, but make sure you're prepared for an advocacy film rather than a historical documentary. Expand
3 of 5 users found this helpful32
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0
texmexDec 13, 2016
The 13th is full of accusations by opportunists-posing-as-historians who profit from reinforcing the fear that black Americans by and large have not experienced progress. There’s such a serious lack of political sophistication that DuVernayThe 13th is full of accusations by opportunists-posing-as-historians who profit from reinforcing the fear that black Americans by and large have not experienced progress. There’s such a serious lack of political sophistication that DuVernay never confronts the welfare state as enslavement. Expand
2 of 4 users found this helpful22
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9
alwaysmeOct 30, 2016
This documentary really made me stop and think. I don't live in America but as a person and as a citizen of a developed country I can't let this pass. Is slavery still tolerated today, in the supposedly "land of the free"? How can I make aThis documentary really made me stop and think. I don't live in America but as a person and as a citizen of a developed country I can't let this pass. Is slavery still tolerated today, in the supposedly "land of the free"? How can I make a change? Why the apparently evolved Americans have so much fear and indifference in their hearts? How can a person be humanized? Expand
1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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10
Dattwood7Oct 7, 2016
Essential. Just wait until it gets to the part about ALEC and how politicians/corporations have a vested interest in harsh crime laws and keeping prisons filled. Unbelievable.
5 of 12 users found this helpful57
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2
lmc28Oct 12, 2016
I gave this 2 stars because the valuable message about the woefully inadequate and unfair prison system in this country is so clouded by the bias and propaganda against conservatives, and the current Republican candidate for president inI gave this 2 stars because the valuable message about the woefully inadequate and unfair prison system in this country is so clouded by the bias and propaganda against conservatives, and the current Republican candidate for president in particular, that it’s laughable. Anyone who is truly interested in prison reform, and therefore justice and fairness for people of color in that regard, would know enough to present the case in a way that did not include a clearly contrived and dishonest sequence of images meant to offend and divide, rather than appeal to the innate sense of fairness in people, regardless of political affiliation. Shame on the producers for squandering an opportunity to do some good. Expand
7 of 21 users found this helpful714
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1
patsruleallDec 26, 2016
Not convinced in the one sided argument until I hear the other side. To bad this was done as an advocacy film and not a documentary. I am sick of the victimization card being played by to many Americans. Media like this gives the targetedNot convinced in the one sided argument until I hear the other side. To bad this was done as an advocacy film and not a documentary. I am sick of the victimization card being played by to many Americans. Media like this gives the targeted group excuse to keep playing that victim card. Politicians, media and academic elites fall right in line with the propoganda. Expand
2 of 6 users found this helpful24
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10
HiiighPowerOct 8, 2016
This is essential viewing. Its focus on the historical impact of institutional racism in the US is both timely and timeless. An eye-opening documentary that will certainly inspire a new wave of much-needed activism.
3 of 10 users found this helpful37
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8
ErectedRacoonOct 12, 2016
No matter how you feel about the masterfully crafted movie's slightly skewed, Michael Moore-ish presented political message, it's essential to watch just for the revelatory insights on ALEC and the historical rundown on the American historyNo matter how you feel about the masterfully crafted movie's slightly skewed, Michael Moore-ish presented political message, it's essential to watch just for the revelatory insights on ALEC and the historical rundown on the American history of slavery. Especially as a non-American citizen. Had I been an American citizen I would have joined a civil rights movement straight after the credits was done rolling as something clearly needs to change in the "Land Of The Free" Expand
1 of 5 users found this helpful14
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7
RatedRexNov 19, 2016
"13th" did its best to explain how the system has purposefully disenfranchised black Americans since the 13th Amendment was passed in 1863. It does an outstanding job shedding light on the subject. But what the documentary did not try to"13th" did its best to explain how the system has purposefully disenfranchised black Americans since the 13th Amendment was passed in 1863. It does an outstanding job shedding light on the subject. But what the documentary did not try to explain is why too many black Americans choose to drop out of school, join gangs, sell drugs inside their own community, and spend a lot of their time disrespecting themselves, their neighbors, and the rest of society. There is a lot of self-hate in certain black communities. The self-hate is as much to blame for the rising jailed population as the system that works hard to keep the black man down. Once black America makes a concerted, unified effort to get pass this malaise that we've been in for the last 400 years, the sooner we will see progress in every facet of society. Every black American has to do his/her part. Documents like these are important to remind us how we got here. But it is time for a few documents to start coming up with solutions on how we can get out. Now that would REALLY be an award winning film. Expand
1 of 7 users found this helpful16
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7
AquaMorphDec 10, 2016
This was a great documentary and covered an important topic but in an heavy handed manner which kind of derailed the documentary. I think it could have pulled that tone off if it offered potential solutions to the problems it was addressingThis was a great documentary and covered an important topic but in an heavy handed manner which kind of derailed the documentary. I think it could have pulled that tone off if it offered potential solutions to the problems it was addressing but after all that is much harder to do than to blame people in the first place. Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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10
alejandro970Mar 26, 2017
The sad and unconfort truth of criminalization and prison system in America, supported by interviews and testimonies of activists and ex- convicts. A must to see.
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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7
GeordiecanuckOct 12, 2016
Beautifully scripted and thoughtfully edited, like The Corporation before it, a lament to the injustice of life for the poor and defeated and a new angle on the futility of any kind of change...jeebus help the rest of us...I do suggest thatBeautifully scripted and thoughtfully edited, like The Corporation before it, a lament to the injustice of life for the poor and defeated and a new angle on the futility of any kind of change...jeebus help the rest of us...I do suggest that "we" stops meaning colour and starts really meaning "WE"...so with that in mind, WHAT CAN WE DO TO CHANGE??? Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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9
SomePersonaJan 2, 2017
This documentary is ordered in a way so that the viewer can view racism evolve into different forms throughout each decade. Besides exaggeration of a few facts, this is a nicely crafted doc.
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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1
signum88May 4, 2020
This documentary takes a situation that is very much gray and paints it completely black. It's essentially a recap of the last 70 years of the USA's history, except every choice and event is made to look like conspiracy of the whites toThis documentary takes a situation that is very much gray and paints it completely black. It's essentially a recap of the last 70 years of the USA's history, except every choice and event is made to look like conspiracy of the whites to enslave and torture black people. More fuel for the fire of division. Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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3
mvrtsJun 25, 2020
Lacks facts and data, Bryan Stevenson seems to be the only reasonable person on the panel who doesn't try to push an agenda. Incarceration numbers went up yes, but they didn't explain the economic or social factors that contributed to it.Lacks facts and data, Bryan Stevenson seems to be the only reasonable person on the panel who doesn't try to push an agenda. Incarceration numbers went up yes, but they didn't explain the economic or social factors that contributed to it. Smears Clinton, whom I strongly dislike, for trying to make communities safer.Three strike law has ruined many live sure, but why play into their hands and get to that point? Expand
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
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