Music Box Films | Release Date: February 13, 2015
7.7
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Generally favorable reviews based on 41 Ratings
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9
fungusgnatJun 15, 2015
“Gett” is shot almost entirely within the courtroom but is nonetheless intensely dramatic—a sort of “One Angry Woman.” But Ronit Elkabetz is not only about displays of anger. In fact, she generally must maintain decorum to avoid contempt of“Gett” is shot almost entirely within the courtroom but is nonetheless intensely dramatic—a sort of “One Angry Woman.” But Ronit Elkabetz is not only about displays of anger. In fact, she generally must maintain decorum to avoid contempt of court. And it is in the seething portraits of her silent outrage that Elkabetz (both as actress and director) truly distinguishes herself. Still, it’s hard to believe that Dargis in the New York Times said of this film that it had “little of the courtroom dramatics that characterize mainstream legal stories.” If anything, the film seemed to me a bit overwrought at times, although the Elkabetzes are more than fair at letting the husband and the rabbinical court have their say without making fools of them—though fools they are, and though the filmmakers wisely allow the story to run close to comedy at times, in the sense that the situation is so outrageous it's almost funny. Expand
2 of 2 users found this helpful20
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10
LowbrowCinemaFeb 23, 2015
GETT: THE TRIAL OF VIVIANE AMSALEM is that rare perfect film. Profound, heartbreaking, funny, absurd, confounding, frustrating.... name it and this is it! It's so exciting to watch a work of this level. Seemingly dealing with one woman'sGETT: THE TRIAL OF VIVIANE AMSALEM is that rare perfect film. Profound, heartbreaking, funny, absurd, confounding, frustrating.... name it and this is it! It's so exciting to watch a work of this level. Seemingly dealing with one woman's claustrophobic nightmare to gett a divorce from her cold husband in Israel, GETT becomes so much more. An examination of misogyny, ego, patriarchy, oppression, love and marriage. The film transcends all cultures to depict a world turned upside down by the need to dominate and control. And then there is the filmmaking. So assured, so still and powerful, where a close up on a foot makes a profound statement, and questions what we think and feel. GETT is work of art without pretension with pure emotion, love and humanity. I was left speechless but couldn’t stop talking about GETT for days. Expand
2 of 2 users found this helpful20
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8
Brent_MarchantFeb 27, 2015
An entertaining though sometimes-stagey look at beliefs, perceptions and attitudes and how they all factor into a domestic dispute brought up for settlement in a rabbinical court. Sometimes touching, sometimes hilarious and sometimes absurd,An entertaining though sometimes-stagey look at beliefs, perceptions and attitudes and how they all factor into a domestic dispute brought up for settlement in a rabbinical court. Sometimes touching, sometimes hilarious and sometimes absurd, this examination of marriage, commitment and the attempted imposition of one's will upon another raises a host of intriguing questions about religion, social impressions and spousal obligations, many of which aren't always easily answered. The film also provides a probing look into a world seldom seen by outsiders, revealing a long-established traditional culture struggling to hang on a modern, ever-changing world. Expand
1 of 1 users found this helpful10
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8
7thartDec 4, 2017
يبدأ القاضي (الحاخام) بالبحث في دوافع الانفصال لدى فيفيان يسأل محاميها: هل كانت تتعرض للعنف؟ فيرد عليه المحامي: يجب أن تعرف العنف سيدي القاضي. فإن كنت تقصد العنف الجسدي فلم يكن زوجها يضربها. أجاب القاضي بسؤال آخر: هل كان يلبي احتياجاتها؟ فيرديبدأ القاضي (الحاخام) بالبحث في دوافع الانفصال لدى فيفيان يسأل محاميها: هل كانت تتعرض للعنف؟ فيرد عليه المحامي: يجب أن تعرف العنف سيدي القاضي. فإن كنت تقصد العنف الجسدي فلم يكن زوجها يضربها. أجاب القاضي بسؤال آخر: هل كان يلبي احتياجاتها؟ فيرد المحامي: عليك أن تعرف لنا المقصود بالحاجة؟ فيأتي جواب القاضي: لا تتذاكى أيها المحامي، هل كان يصرف عليها المال ويُطعمها؟ فيرد المحامي: نعم كان يفعل. فينتهي القاضي إلى القول: اذن لا دوافع! Expand
1 of 1 users found this helpful10
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6
TVJerryApr 16, 2015
Since there is no such thing as civil divorce in Israel, the titular woman can only petition a panel of rabbis. This 2-hour film spends its entirety in a claustrophobic room during a 5-year series of hearings. It does offer some fascinatingSince there is no such thing as civil divorce in Israel, the titular woman can only petition a panel of rabbis. This 2-hour film spends its entirety in a claustrophobic room during a 5-year series of hearings. It does offer some fascinating and frustrating insights into the culture and the directors have infused it with a stark artistic approach. However, your patience is also on trial: not only because the proceedings are so exasperating, but because the endless inflexible dialogue is, well, endless. If you have the patience to endure the droning tedium and a taste for austere foreign films, it might be worth a viewing. In Hebrew and French with subtitles. Expand
1 of 3 users found this helpful12
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5
GreatMartinMar 26, 2015
In the Orthodox Jewish religion a woman can’t get a divorce without the husband’s permission and is given a gett in her hand from him that basically says “You are hereby permitted to all men.” This in effect says she is no longer a marriedIn the Orthodox Jewish religion a woman can’t get a divorce without the husband’s permission and is given a gett in her hand from him that basically says “You are hereby permitted to all men.” This in effect says she is no longer a married woman and returns to the wife all the legal rights that a husband is responsible for in their marriage. The divorce decree is only obtainable in Israel from a rabbinical court. In a so called ‘modern’ democratic country it may surprise many that in a marriage a woman has no equality.

“Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem”, the Israel nominated Oscar contender for Best Foreign Film, is the third, and a stand alone, in a trilogy of this couple. This is a trial with Vivianne as the only woman, her lawyer, her husband and his lawyer who happens to be his brother and the three rabbi judges. Over a period of 5 years we follow her fight for that important piece of paper for her to get on with her life.

As the trial progresses, or doesn’t, we learn about the wife Viviane and husband Elisha, their 4 children, their marriage and why she wants a divorce and he won’t give her one. It isn’t until the middle of the movie that her sister and sister-in-law are presented bringing some fireworks to the screen which takes place mainly in a square windowless room with two tables, 4 chairs and the rabbis raised up on a dais, with another table brought in for the witnesses.

“Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem” was written and directed by the sister and brother team Ronit and Shlomi Elkabetz with Ronit playing Viviane and Shlomi, her husband Elisha. With the exception of 2 impressive outbursts Ronit holds the screen with her very expressive face while Shlomi has a quiet power as he tries to explain himself. Both Menashe Noy, as her lawyer, and Sasson Gabay, as his, support the two impressively.

“Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem” tackles an intriguing subject that not many people know about but moves too slowly to be as effective as it could and should be.
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0 of 2 users found this helpful02
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9
EpicLadySpongeApr 28, 2016
Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem may have to make a runner up if it wants to be the best film of 2015. Oh wait, that runner up is so far. Oh well, at least Gett's still enjoyable.
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
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