Annapurna Pictures | Release Date: April 12, 2019
7.4
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 34 Ratings
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Positive:
27
Mixed:
5
Negative:
2
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6
amheretojudgeApr 21, 2019
Butler has made a longer than twenty minutes of a sitcom episode, it is light and public opinionated, it is going to get the attention, it is made to.

Missing Link Butler's love story is not of the epic scale its theme suggests, it is more
Butler has made a longer than twenty minutes of a sitcom episode, it is light and public opinionated, it is going to get the attention, it is made to.

Missing Link

Butler's love story is not of the epic scale its theme suggests, it is more rich and high in its poem than it is or should have been electrifying. But then everything is left until the very last moment, whether it be then uplifting conversations or the punchline in the storytelling. Speaking of which, the humor isn't as smooth as it was in The Kubo And The Two Strings, there is a lot of extra effort that is to be dragged. While the rest of the effort is spent upon contradicting your opinion or expectations on how or where the film and characters are leading towards. Ironically, in order to do so, Chris Butler, the writer-director, has somehow managed to spring in that same fragrant flower that we all adore but also are familiar to.

The only possible way to reach for the "get out" clause in such a situation is to derive a maturity that would make him bulletproof. And pinning down the sequence where the lead, the protagonist, is helping his friend from falling into the sea, that very moment paints the poised nature of the film where it doesn't appeal to its viewers with irrelevant and incongruent flight jumps or heroic moments to draw in the gasps but stays true to the narration that makes sense in this loud train of summer blockbuster.

Personally, it would always be a love story for me, and not between two individuals, but one personality split into two diversely behaved men, shaved and not so shaved. The mirror like persona that they carry is a beauty to behold, with two separate paths leading to a rendezvous point which is then evolved into the "Home Sweet Home", is the Missing Link that they solve through shuffling the priorities, it starts off as the tale of "The One" and negotiates with us into the "We" type of allegory.
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1 of 1 users found this helpful10
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8
GinaKApr 18, 2019
A good-natured, funny, colorful, and very entertaining film without any real bite. No satire here, so turn your mind off. Enjoy the wonderful graphics and the clever dialogue, but be warned that this is definitely a smart film for intelligentA good-natured, funny, colorful, and very entertaining film without any real bite. No satire here, so turn your mind off. Enjoy the wonderful graphics and the clever dialogue, but be warned that this is definitely a smart film for intelligent kids and not for adults looking for anything remotely Swiftian. Expand
2 of 3 users found this helpful21
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8
ThisIsActing100Apr 15, 2019
All Laika films are a pleasant reminder of the value and beauty of hand-made art. Stop motion is an endangered kind of animation, and the fact that there is a studio that continues to work in this style and devotes so much attention to everyAll Laika films are a pleasant reminder of the value and beauty of hand-made art. Stop motion is an endangered kind of animation, and the fact that there is a studio that continues to work in this style and devotes so much attention to every detail in the frame is stunning. The visual component of "Missing Link" is the brightest and most ambitious film of the studio today. Although his story is not as emotionally complex and deep as the story of “Kubo and two strings ” is a charming, kind, fast-paced adventure, where Laika demonstrates both farce and witty dialogues along with beautiful animation. Starting with impeccable decorations and ending with visually breathtaking scenes with elaborate details, the Lost Link looks incredible. In this story, there is even a place for some actual topics about how a person endangers and destroys everything that he discovers and exposes the true nature of a “civilized society”. Sometimes the most important adventure you can take is finding someone who joins you in your future adventures. Find someone and see the next animation victory Laika studio Expand
2 of 3 users found this helpful21
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10
joelboyApr 29, 2019
Fantastic, funny, giant adventure movie with a trip around the world. I would recommend it to any family looking for some quality fun at the theatre.
1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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7
Compi24May 7, 2019
It might be the lightest Laika offering to date -- both in depth and in tone -- but what "Missing Link" lacks in real meaning, it makes up for in sheer entertainment value and enjoyment. Thanks to some clever implementation of oddball humor,It might be the lightest Laika offering to date -- both in depth and in tone -- but what "Missing Link" lacks in real meaning, it makes up for in sheer entertainment value and enjoyment. Thanks to some clever implementation of oddball humor, a handful of thrilling set-pieces, and some winsome voice work from Hugh Jackman and Zach Galifianakis, you're ultimately left with one of the better animated efforts I've seen as of late. Not the best, but most definitely better than the common rabble. Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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8
LELoboMay 16, 2019
Missing link had great vivid animation, cleverly written & entertaining for all ages
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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4
TrevorsViewApr 18, 2019
From 1900 to the first photographed black hole, from White men ruling the nation to women finally being allowed to serve as police officers, political correctness seems to get the better of our crazy nature, to the extent where a perfectlyFrom 1900 to the first photographed black hole, from White men ruling the nation to women finally being allowed to serve as police officers, political correctness seems to get the better of our crazy nature, to the extent where a perfectly healthy desire to achieve equal rights becomes our greatest poison. Missing Link tries to fill those gaps between 100 years ago and now with its best intentions at heart, but ultimately doesn’t get most of anything right. No proper insight exposes what anybody thinks about anything, not even a view of the Statue of Liberty under construction, which is there for no reason besides to look pretty.

This story remains completely typical as it replicates beat-by-beat the unemotional American love story—where the girl at first hates the boy but then she changes after accepting his immaturity. This “boy” is actually a well-dressed grown gentleman named Lionel, one who isn’t ashamed to join in on a fiddle-and-string saloon bar fight during his glossed-over travels to the United States. Lionel’s story really isn’t worth exploring anyway, since in his first scene, he seems unfazed when a prehistoric lake monster drags his colleague underwater, automatically making him a jerk not worthy of sympathy.

These childish characters go through absolutely no change by the end, particularly Lionel’s passive co-lead, the legendary sasquatch. Despite being the last of his kind in a disappearing home, the big-footed beast never gives the viewer a reason to care about their journey to the Himalayas. It’s not charming when they ride on a negatively depicted Indian transportation vehicle (saddle and elephant), it’s not hot with high stakes when a one-dimensional villain tries to stop them for money, it merely settles for getting the job done.

Although production designer Lou Romano (The Incredibles) still reflects reluctant old, old tribal art styles in the colorful set pieces. Right from the opening shot of a bare snow footprint that transitions into a shoe-bearing human footprint, Romano keeps feet a consistent metaphor. There’s a huge castle that is framed to compensate for the tonal coldness as it triggers acrophobia icier than a grassy civilization, and there’s Lionel running on the walls of a boat as it scales ninety degrees up a wave. Director Chris Butler (ParaNorman) knows how to combine the ancient craft of making figurine dolls with modern technology to tell stories in a way inspired off centuries-old traditions.

Now, it’s time to highlight the film’s biggest laugh beyond a photorealistic bird’s-eye desert sea view: It’s Ching Valdes-Aran, the best voice actor in the cast, who voices a confused, quiet old lady named Gamu. Especially when she shrieks, the reason is strong enough of a joke, but her delivery of that shriek makes the final punch complete. Valdes-Aran is not the only one whose voice connects perfectly to the puppet eyes, everyone in the cast does all that they can to attempt a full experience in spite of the dreadful script. It results in some really funny moments, including why one character is named “Susan,” and why that name connects to the literal thought process of the big orange behemoth. It’s nothing special or memorable, but most certainly gets the chuckle going.

The laughs aren’t enough though; it would be much funnier with a logical explanation as to why Mr. Sasquatch speaks and reads perfect English, aside from just being around humans all the time. Not to mention the disguise Lionel dresses him up in has the buttons bursting at the seams, yet nobody notices. The comedy would also ring truer if there were more prevalent questions addressed beyond just the third scene about the authenticity of evolution.

The distance from reality results in another core of humanity this film wrongfully ignores: religion. One just can’t talk about the missing links between man and ape without bringing Christianity, Science, or Christian Science into it as well. Instead of something that deserves a watch and rewatch, this widely atheistic story about White folk centers around typical tropes, those that would no longer become clichés if there were just more philosophical concepts brought up for the audience to ponder over. That goes as well to its lack of international representation, which seems to have low priority to the designs of bug-eyed seagulls with unrealistically oversized heads.

For a different cinematic experience that attempts to spark our fear of vulnerability, but actually succeeds, then watch Us, which is so far the best movie of 2019 for confronting our national fear. It’s even better to go off away from all civilization to hang out with the penguins in Antarctica, kind of like what Disney’s latest documentary filmmakers just did. Now there’s another worthwhile cinematic experience which deserves more attention than a stop-motion letdown like Missing Link!
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0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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8
HealingToolboxJun 5, 2019
Wow, madly wonderful, worldclass, exceptional and creative art direction. An astounding from the Kubo movie, which has a much stronger script. This one may have unintentionally been made by and for animators more than for a general audience.
0 of 0 users found this helpful00
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6
JLuis_001Apr 23, 2019
I watched it without expectations and I was surprised. Nothing extraordinary but not mediocre either.
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7
RobertFloydMay 27, 2019
Missing link has really cool animation and Zack gives a really good performance but from the other laika animation movies, this is the one that is made the most for children but knowing that, I still liked it.
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8
zaraedly21Jun 1, 2019
+1 866 940 OOO5 toll free customer helpline number Best information i have ever seen. ;;
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