Magnolia Pictures | Release Date: November 23, 2018
8.6
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Universal acclaim based on 114 Ratings
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Mixed:
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6
bataguilaMay 6, 2019
Es muy lenta, muy sucia, da asco, los personajes no son carismaticos, pero la historia al final vale mucho la pena
1 of 1 users found this helpful10
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6
LajaleaaMay 7, 2019
"When you love someone, this is what you do."
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( #60/100 ) . El propósito de Shoplifters es importante, complejo y con un valor reflexivo enorme, sin embargo, su valor final está en el dilema moral (que solo propone) y no en la experiencia
"When you love someone, this is what you do."
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( #60/100 )
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El propósito de Shoplifters es importante, complejo y con un valor reflexivo enorme, sin embargo, su valor final está en el dilema moral (que solo propone) y no en la experiencia narrativa y cultural que trata de integrar a ese dilema.
Esta es una familia que puede ayudar y adoptar a una niña con quien solo ganan dilemas morales y económicos.
Con 2 horas de duración, Shoplifters le dedica 3/4 del tiempo a explorar esos dilemas y exponer una gran gama de emociones personales. Al principio es fácil dejare llevar por esa observación y admirar los detalles de un espacio oprimido en una cultura específica, pero la falta de tensión y la gran carga de sensibilidad provoca que la #película se vuelva pesada y menos conmovedora, aun cuando visualmente intriga el hecho de que puede agregar textura, temperatura y tamaño a la historia. Es hasta el último tercio cuando se presentan una serie de enigmas que no se introducen previamente de forma adecuada. A partir de ahí, la actuación se eleva minimamente para cooperar con un suspenso con poco sustento, pero que tiene éxito en plantear un dilema moral que, mientras más inocente sea el espectador del propósito, menos atención ganará.
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The porpoise of "Shoplifters" it's important, complex and with a big reflective value, however, its final value is in its moral dilemma (which only proposes) and not in the narrative and cultural experience that tries to incorporate in that dilemma.
This is a family that can help and adopt a little girl who only brings economic and moral dilemmas.
With 2 hours of duration, Shoplifters dedicates 3/4 of its time to explore those dilemmas and expose a wide range of personal emotions. At the beginning its easy to let go by that observation and admire the details of a repress space in a specific culture, but the lack of tension and the big deal of sensibility provokes that the #movie becomes heavy and each time less moving, even when visually intrigues the fact that it can add texture, temperature, and size to the story. It's until the last third when a series of enigmas are presented without being introduced properly. From there, the acting elevates minimally to cooperate with a suspense with little sustain, but it achieves to stipulate a moral dilemma that, while more innocent the spectator is of the porpoise, less attention it will have.
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1 of 1 users found this helpful10
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10
GoldenFingersFeb 16, 2019
"Shoplifters" is a "stunningly beautiful" depiction of life and family. In my opinion only "The Favourite" and "Roma" competes with this for best film in the world in 2018. There are few films that are masterpieces, this is one of them.
1 of 1 users found this helpful10
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10
Rebecca31Jan 5, 2019
Not many films can crack my cold heart but Shoplifters has become one of the rare exceptions. A deeply moving film about love, friendship and family. I experienced too many emotions during this film and I don’t know how to handle them.

A
Not many films can crack my cold heart but Shoplifters has become one of the rare exceptions. A deeply moving film about love, friendship and family. I experienced too many emotions during this film and I don’t know how to handle them.

A family of small time criminals come across a young girl one night in the freezing cold. Although they barely have enough as it is they decide to keep the girl and raise her as their own. You’re not immediately sure how these people are related to each other but nonetheless they are a family. Not at all what I was expecting with some surprisingly dark turns. Beautiful and devastating. There is so much more to Shoplifters the more you watch it, and by the end you’ll still be thinking about this film. Heartbreaking, and highly recommended.
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3 of 4 users found this helpful31
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10
PatrickSousaNov 23, 2018
A touching and humanism film with a beautiful message about love, partnership and family.
2 of 3 users found this helpful21
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10
NightReviewsDec 26, 2018
Shoplifters by Hirokazu Koreeda is one of the most beautiful portraits of the family household and its elements ever graced on-screen, and yes, that is how I am starting this review. While the last little while has been an array of firsts,Shoplifters by Hirokazu Koreeda is one of the most beautiful portraits of the family household and its elements ever graced on-screen, and yes, that is how I am starting this review. While the last little while has been an array of firsts, experiencing a Koreeda film, I found myself recalling immortal auteurs like Yasujiro Ozu with his “seasons” series of melodramas, chiefly revolving around domestic trials and tribulations of man and humanity itself. At times I found it played like a Vittorio De Sica film, sprawling with driven poverty and poetic synthesis, proving on being a companion piece to his infamous Bicycle Thieves. While this film is already in the company of great films, winning the Palme D’Or at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, Shoplifters is absolutely spellbinding! It’s a film that is reviving the idea that modern cinema can move and transcend audiences in the most simplistic and organic of settings and motions. In my humblest and sincerest personal opinion, classic French, Italian and Japanese cinema produces truly spiritual, dreamlike cinematic material. Works from these countries articulate family, love, and spirituality through a lens that is equally transformative yet daringly raw and different from Western cinema. Ringing true to the genuine human condition than anything I have seen from Hollywood, Shoplifters is a film that has shifted my opinion on modern directors and modern cinema as a whole. With Shoplifter’s we are truly drawn to a familiar world where the lens provides a gaze though the eyes of a real auteur. While I always disregarded the notion that anything shot with a modern camera in modern settings could materialize into the type of work that Kurosawa or Ozu have created, I have always believed filmmakers like these have unmatched qualities, until now. Koreeda’s extreme sense of self-awareness and implementing a strong social dynamic, the characters and narrative of Shoplifters blossoms into a truly hearty cinematic experience.

Although the story and narrative of Shoplifters really has no real importance, this is a film that truly draws from its actors and their interactions, to create a family that really delves into the depths of complex moral issues, bonds of love and the ideas of nature versus nurture, that hasn’t been seen in film for many years. Yet, the casting in the film is perhaps, and although this may be a wholly bold statement, the best casting I have seen in at least a decade. Ranging from young child actors to older and respected Japanese acting icons, each familial role is worked and managed into broken down fibres of relatable family members we have in our own lives.

The film tells the story of the Shibata’s. Osamu Shibata, played by Lily Franky, the real patriarch of the family, provides the film with the majority of its humour, especially when he is teaching his ‘children’ the fine ‘art’ of theft. Early on, we see that he passes on his skills to his ‘son’ Shota played exceptionally well by Jyo Kairi. Relentless and effortless, the two are shown to be very close and possessing so many of the dynamics seen between a father and son relationship we have come to expect in film. Shota’s mother, Nobuyo (Sakura Hando) works at a dry cleaners providing her share for the family, also engaging in forms of theft. Nobuyo’s sister Aki (May Matsuoka) works at a soft-core gentlemen’s cyber club performing for her dividend. All of the finances rendezvous at the flat the family stays in tucked away in an extremely quiet neighborhood. A large chunk of the rent that comes along with space is paid for by the true matriarch of the household, Grandmother Hatsue, played tirelessly by Kirin Kiki, who recently passed at the tender age of seventy-five.

While each character’s role is paramount in expressing the moral teachings in Koreeda’s perfectly woven story, there is a firm affinity for Koreeda’s sense of family and togetherness that does not go unnoticed. Each family member play each of their respectable roles honestly, spreading words and dialogue that ceases to shy from the harsh realities of such a lifestyle, yet brilliantly completely shatter society’s belittling and scoffing nature towards them by being individual embodiments of humanity at all stages and ages of life.

The family begins to change its dynamic when Osamu and Shota walk home one evening from a routine shoplift, and find Yuri (Miyu Sasaki), a small child left in the barren waste of her broken family’s home. Together, the two males bring Yuri back home, and the family agrees to keep her safe and make her one of them, a Shibata, due to their parents physical, emotional and mental abuse that can be heard from the open windows of their home.
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2 of 3 users found this helpful21
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10
johndoe2014Dec 3, 2018
I hope this movie gets to wider audiences. I think it is a masterpiece. It juxtaposes real human connection to conventional conceptions of family in a way that is so powerful. It does not seem like much but it builds and builds and eventuallyI hope this movie gets to wider audiences. I think it is a masterpiece. It juxtaposes real human connection to conventional conceptions of family in a way that is so powerful. It does not seem like much but it builds and builds and eventually the message is so clear and we are invested and care about these people and admire them even though society will not. It made me cry and emotionally engage in a way that few movies do. Expand
1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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7
Brent_MarchantDec 30, 2018
After a painfully slow first hour, this Japanese comedy-drama about unconventional family life redeems itself in its second half, with heart-tugging emotion and stunning revelations. While there are hints of what's to come in the first half,After a painfully slow first hour, this Japanese comedy-drama about unconventional family life redeems itself in its second half, with heart-tugging emotion and stunning revelations. While there are hints of what's to come in the first half, the pacing, unfortunately, is a little too tedious to justify the slow-moving manner in which director Hirokazu Koreada tells his story. Despite the many accolades this release has earned at film festivals and in awards competitions, it's too bad that the picture lacks the consistency it needs to make it a better offering overall. Expand
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6
BHBarryDec 6, 2018
"Shoplifters" is a Japanese language film written and directed by Hirokazu Koreeda. This is a difficult film to watch for a number of reasons, the most prominent being that the script and the story it tells is confusing and almost impossible"Shoplifters" is a Japanese language film written and directed by Hirokazu Koreeda. This is a difficult film to watch for a number of reasons, the most prominent being that the script and the story it tells is confusing and almost impossible to follow. The last third of the film tries to explain who the characters really are and the motivations each has in relation to the other but this places too much of a burden on the audience who, for 2/3 of the film had to sit adrift and at sea in trying to find out exactly what is going on. Much like the critics of the artsy Ingmar Bergman movies, so many of the critics who loved this film saw more in it than I believe the writer/director ever intended. The editing room needed someone in it in addition to Mr. Koreeda in order to give objective cuts, segues and scene placement changes so that the story sought to be told would be more easily understood. In its present form, however, and bearing in mind the kindness of the season, I it a 6.0 with the responsibility for this low rating falling squarely on the shoulders (and probably the ego) of Mr. Koreeda. Expand
1 of 5 users found this helpful14
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4
OlivierPielFeb 18, 2019
I like my Japanese films as much as the next Western snob but I really had to give up 25 min in. I read critics comparing this to Ozu, Mike Leigh, the Italian neo-realists or even Bresson. However Ozu and Bresson use a much more focused andI like my Japanese films as much as the next Western snob but I really had to give up 25 min in. I read critics comparing this to Ozu, Mike Leigh, the Italian neo-realists or even Bresson. However Ozu and Bresson use a much more focused and minimalist cinematography that convey a far superior poetry and art. Some of the scenes feel as gratuitous and mostly used for shock-value for the Japanese middle-class audience (the introduction to the family home with the granny cutting toenails at the table is so ham-fisted than it becomes too farcical). Other critics say that you have to wait for the second part to see resolution. If that is a case, then the director commits the number crime in art: boredom! As for the other comments on "humanism" (heart-wrenching etc...) and "naturalism" or "realism", these actually confirm the lack of intrinsic artistic value of this film since "mirroring the reality of those less fortunate" reeks of the most hypocritical impulse of the middle-class, pity and commiseration. Expand
1 of 7 users found this helpful16
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8
TVJerryJan 28, 2019
This struggling group provides much of its basics by stealing them, but the story is actually about their relationships and the way they create a family. The films starts in a store, where 2 of them are stealing food, but expands when theyThis struggling group provides much of its basics by stealing them, but the story is actually about their relationships and the way they create a family. The films starts in a store, where 2 of them are stealing food, but expands when they bring home a young girl who's alone and scared. As she's integrated into their lives, their daily activities are presented with an underplayed naturalness. The performances are reserved, yet compelling. The film is quietly paced and develops their connections with patience. Low-key by American standards, but sweetly sensitive and ultimately touching. In Japanese with subtitles. Expand
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10
katezoeMar 21, 2019
Heartfelt view on what a "family" is. The film has a wonderful message on love and humanity. Have patience...movie starts out slow. One of the top five movies of 2018.
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10
GinaKDec 12, 2018
I have to be honest. I doubt if this film will please the average American moviegoer. It takes patience and openness to other cultures and circumstances. I found it riveting, but without highs and lows or melodrama. It steals your soul asI have to be honest. I doubt if this film will please the average American moviegoer. It takes patience and openness to other cultures and circumstances. I found it riveting, but without highs and lows or melodrama. It steals your soul as effortlessly as the “family” in the film steals crisps from the local convenience store. Expand
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10
swelleanorJan 2, 2019
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. This is a beautiful, heartbreaking film with so many small, sweet moments that it is just a treat to watch. I do imagine it'd be slow for some moviegoers. But if you can go in with patience and an open mind, you'll be rewarded. Expand
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8
MetaflixDec 12, 2018
'Shoplifters' notably won the Palme d'Or at Cannes this year, the first Japanese film to do so since 1997's 'The Eel.' It has since gone on to win 11 other awards and was recently nominated by the Golden Globes for Best Foreign Language'Shoplifters' notably won the Palme d'Or at Cannes this year, the first Japanese film to do so since 1997's 'The Eel.' It has since gone on to win 11 other awards and was recently nominated by the Golden Globes for Best Foreign Language Motion Picture.

The merit for all these accolades isn't immediately apparent to audiences when initially delving into the picture, which features a small but close-knit family unit reliant on shoplifting and other petty crimes to survive.

However, the film becomes more and more engrossing as the ties that bond the characters together are further tested and examined. Additionally, since domestic audiences aren't familiar with the actors, it lends an incredible amount of authenticity to their roles, further amplified by writer/director Hirokazu Koreeda's impeccable camera placement.

In the end, this isn't a film that leaves you either exhilarated or exhausted when exiting the theater. Contemplative, perhaps, is the best way to describe it, lingering well beyond when the other emotions have already faded away.
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8
JLuis_001Feb 18, 2019
Without making noise, Hirokazu Kore-eda has established himself as one of the most consistent and solid directors in the industry in the last 10 years.
With Shoplifters delivers yet another incredibly humanistic film achieving a very high
Without making noise, Hirokazu Kore-eda has established himself as one of the most consistent and solid directors in the industry in the last 10 years.
With Shoplifters delivers yet another incredibly humanistic film achieving a very high level and also maintaining the quality despite its simplicity and yet remains profound and rewarding

Frankly I could already see why this film won the Palm d'Or at Cannes 2018 and I think it was justly deserved.
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8
amheretojudgeFeb 13, 2019
Lift It Higher.

Manbiki Kazoku Koreeda is a skillful writer weaving out set pieces in his words that are individually captivating in its entirety. And the result is one long satisfying stay. You feel like a guest entering his world and he
Lift It Higher.

Manbiki Kazoku

Koreeda is a skillful writer weaving out set pieces in his words that are individually captivating in its entirety. And the result is one long satisfying stay. You feel like a guest entering his world and he welcomes you with open arms. He is a host that respects the boundaries and sculpts the antics accordingly. To be honest, his film is split into only two acts. It all starts with Yuri (Muyi Sasaki) accepting the house as a guest and the response she gets from each member of the house. Picking out a string of an equation of each member of the family with her, the act spirals out series of sequences that brick by brick constructs a suave strong bonding in the risky yet overprotective house.

And on the other side, the second act, is completely opposite, it deconstructs those already established rumors, with the help of the clues spread around in its first act, and the fire catches slowly and poetically. The characters start questioning things that we- the audience- have been questioning from the first frame, and this connection has its own merits, it feels incredibly cathartic to dance in sync with the characters. Aki played by Mayu Matsuoka has the strongest role to portray, particularly since she is away from all the razzle dazzle that this family goes through.

And yet spiritually she finds the same mirror to confront herself in. Her bonding with her grandmother that isn't actually explored thoroughly in the film is actually subjected to Sasaki's character that is in her initial stages of this grand welcome of the family; a masterstroke by the writer. Osamu (Lily Franky) and Shota (Jyo Kairi), the core relationship of the film pins down the fragility of the responsibility that a teacher or an idol carries but personally I loved his equation with Aki (Sakura Ando) as it never fully conjures the screen.

There is a lot that they have been through and evidently a lot we have to catch up with, the decision maker and the hard worker and the nature versus nurture, these improvements raised in early stages makes it more shady and juicy. And Ando as a protective guardian to this family has performed majestically, her confessional scenes- and there are plenty- can reason out of the room, the moment when she finally accepts Sasaki as her daughter and burns her clothes, is one of the best scene of the film.

It projects not only her willful right and the command over the spirit but also her confident to be a parent; a powerful scene sincerely fabricated by equally powerful performance. Koreeda's world is actually too diplomatic to be cinematic, yet his meticulous script that glorifies tiny characteristics of the scenario, brings out an exhilarating experience from us. This is a sort of script that thrives upon various elements, collecting them like coins, Koreeda is on a sprint for a marathon where at the end of the line, these Shoplifters are more humans even though less civilized.
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9
FatalBrushDec 1, 2018
A beautifully shot, original, realistic, touching and unconventional movie that makes you think. The ending was a bit improper I think, mainly because some of the actors seemed off their place. However, hands down one of the best movies atA beautifully shot, original, realistic, touching and unconventional movie that makes you think. The ending was a bit improper I think, mainly because some of the actors seemed off their place. However, hands down one of the best movies at the ZFF this year. Expand
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9
AndrewBurgeMar 28, 2019
Hirokazu Koreeda's "Shoplifters" is the most human film of the year. All more impressive given the fact that it takes place in Tokyo, one of the most advanced and 'robotic' places on Earth. But perhaps this is what gives it power.

The plot
Hirokazu Koreeda's "Shoplifters" is the most human film of the year. All more impressive given the fact that it takes place in Tokyo, one of the most advanced and 'robotic' places on Earth. But perhaps this is what gives it power.

The plot is simple enough. A family of small-time crooks decide to take in a child they find outside in the cold--thanks for formulating it for me, IMDB. Her name is Yuri (Miyu Sasaki), still in pre-school. As she slowly blends in with the family, Koreeda pulls us into their small hovel in which they all live crowded on top of each other. But they are happy! I started to ask myself, so what's the problem, exactly? And here it is what this film does best!

Its subtle, it pulls you inside a comfortable family bubble, and then when you feel at peace, you realize that hold on--what about the girl's parents? What about the police looking for her? You suddenly realize that from an outside point-of-view, what they did to her is bad. Instead of returning her to her family, they unofficially adopted her. But Yuri is also reluctant to return home as her parents are neglecting her.

Slowly, two contradicting moral and social views arise yet you can't help but feel that despite the condition in which she leaves, Yuri is better off with her artificial family. But if this were to be part of the news on TV you would definitely not feel the same--I know I wouldn't. Koreeda is using the film's personal and insight view as a means of compelling our morality to offset our ration. But this is not surprising. As an art form, films are made to adhere to our emotions rather than our mind.

There are many great moments in this film, most, although not all, coming from the relationship of this family. I will not spoil them here because they are too many but more importantly they are to be experienced first hand. No surprising plot twists whats-o-ever just pure, personal, relatable humanity.
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8
m15964Mar 15, 2019
These group of people do this huge wrong thing so simple and with love together that I really liked it, but when you face to the mystery behind the whole story, it make you to think about all the poverty around the world (even in a countryThese group of people do this huge wrong thing so simple and with love together that I really liked it, but when you face to the mystery behind the whole story, it make you to think about all the poverty around the world (even in a country like Japan). This is crazy! MUST SEE! Expand
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9
IsaacJJan 1, 2019
Hirokazu Kore-eda has been heralded as an unsung hero of current direction, a modern day Yasujiro Ozu, who has seen success both in his home country of Japan and overseas. His new picture, Shoplifters, has garnered widespread criticalHirokazu Kore-eda has been heralded as an unsung hero of current direction, a modern day Yasujiro Ozu, who has seen success both in his home country of Japan and overseas. His new picture, Shoplifters, has garnered widespread critical acclaim, winning the coveted Palme D'Or at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival.
Having seen this film, I can only say that Shoplifters is thoroughly deserving of its praise; here, Kore-eda has succeeded in crafting a subtle, yet affecting film, detailing the story of a band of marginalised thieves, forced to shoplift to get by in a poverty-stricken corner of Tokyo.
What is perhaps most striking about Shoplifters is how it manages to be so profound, yet at the same time being so understated. Like many of the director's films, family lies at the heart of this, though in often darker and more twisted ways than one might expect. Osamu (played with a **** edge by Lily Franky) and his wife, Nobuyo (a captivating Sakura Ando) are exploitative both in their relationship with the elderly Hatsue (Kirin Kiki), whose pension they abuse, and with the young waifs they take in (kidnap or save? this is left suitably ambiguous). There is a definite air of darkness that hangs about the film, yet, even in the bleakest moments, there is a tenderness too, with many scenes showing the endearing ways in which the "family" bond with and depend on eachother, especially after taking in the abused youngster, Yuri (Miyu Sasaki).
The picture is also beautifully shot, Ryuto Kondo's artistic cinematography assuaging the drama and aiding the film's subtlety and beauty. Most scenes are long and languid, the dialogue effortless and naturalistic and executed by a talented and, even against the odds, likeable ensemble. Credit should also be given to Shoplifters for never glossing over its themes; young Aki's employment in a hostess club and the abuse suffered by Yuri lie in the background, understated, yet profoundly affecting. The themes of the film are complex, blurring the lines of morality and responsibility, yet it never feels heavy; Kore-eda is letting his audience form their own opinion about the issues represented. What Shoplifters may lack in clear plot, it makes up for in rich and fleshed out characters and sharp writing, which ranges from witty to silently poignant. The film rambles a little in a more cluttered third act, but this is made up by an utterly heart-breaking coda.
With Shoplifters, Hirokazu Kore-eda has crafted a near perfect picture, elegantly executed and quietly moving, with an important and incredibly human message at its core
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9
ThatFilmGuy20Feb 16, 2019
A breathtaking display of realism, I'm in complete awe right now, Shoplifters tells a touching story that evokes so many emotions and it does it well, it's seemingly simple at first sight but it's so nuanced to a point where you'd findA breathtaking display of realism, I'm in complete awe right now, Shoplifters tells a touching story that evokes so many emotions and it does it well, it's seemingly simple at first sight but it's so nuanced to a point where you'd find yourself expecting a certain ending, preferably happy, but this film sticks to realism and it dismantles the social norms with such grace to a point where it offers a new insight to a world unknown to most, where people long for family love and they're desperate to have someone to call family, I must admit that it made me tear up at certain times on account of the raw emotions it conveys.
the acting here is marvelous, it's more of a team effort as every character completes another and ultimately form an arc that tells the story in a brilliant way.
Shoplifters is a rare exercise of social realism, it gets its message across so elegantly, filmmaking at its finest.
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10
SolanciaFeb 24, 2019
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes.Yes. Expand
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5
mohamad91hkJun 5, 2019
Nice emotional movie that brings tears to your eyes, but it could be better.

I like the performance of little girl "Juri", she didn't talk so much in the movie, but she was acting by her expressions, I think without her the movie will be
Nice emotional movie that brings tears to your eyes, but it could be better.

I like the performance of little girl "Juri", she didn't talk so much in the movie, but she was acting by her expressions, I think without her the movie will be boring, she gave the audience emotional feelings.

Hirokazu could create a better story with same cast than this tricky one. I didn't like the ending, it doesn't make you satisfied, also the secrets that reveal at the end, it doesn't make surprised, it's better to keep the story clear from beginning, I think it will be more sentimental.

Finally, the movie is nice and think Korean movies are growing so fast with a promising future.
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10
phuskineJan 15, 2019
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. We know very well that poor families suffer winter more than any other, yearning, whilst their bones splinter, the warm breeze of a summer morning. We know, as well, that when the sun and humidity arrive, these same families perspire and suffocate, seeking shade and shelter among deteriorated housing units that, paradoxically, end up amplifying the feeling of asphyxia. Addressing a colossal challenge like Shoplifters, a showcase of this world, demands a distinguished sensitivity in the narrative disposition of its script and, necessarily, an impeccable direction; that is, the satisfactory achievement of an intricate project that demonstrates full mastery in the use and handling of specific audiovisual poetics. But how far can this poetics go? Possibly, as far as what was achieved by Hirokazu Kore-eda in his latest film. Shoplifters (2018) is a jewel of hylemorphic cohesion, a risky gamble, which adds to the endless debate on the human question. It is about the film technique at the service of an impossible story, as impossible as life and the contradictions that abound in the heart of our modern societies. With the new motion picture of Kore-eda, we are witnessing a story of extreme delicacy, which makes us forget at times, through characters so fascinatingly portrayed, either by their singular histrionic charm or by the unstoppable dynamics of the acting ensemble, that the best intentions are always measured by their consequences and collateral damages. What is trully problematic comes from the careful consideration of the principles of its characters, particularly those presented by the ones who are adults, because, even though condemned socially, they raise a lot of questions about our own conception of what exactly does a family is and mean (...). What comes in the middle is a recrudescence of the harsh and ambivalent sensations that are thrown towards the spectator facing the events unfold. The characters go from mere cartoons to the nervousness that always accompanies the process of cracking an imposter. And we watch, then, how the narrative oscillates with violence between polarized extremes, namely, from the kidnapping of a girl to her warm acceptance within the household of the abductors, which is capable of making her feel, for the first time, determined, respected and loved; from frigidity to indulgence, from anonymity to intimate consideration of a stranger, from the dream of living in a new house with your family to the humbled recognition that your child can be lost joking about an expensive hammer... from living miserably to die incognitably. Bury me in the yard under the tiny pond (...). Its greatest virtue lies in the universality that underlies the act of unmasking others and finding, behind their faces, a mirror. Kore-eda decides to go a little further giving us the story of a family whose members, to a greater or lesser degree, resemble all families (...). Shoplifters shows us a different but more palpable Japan than ever. A demystified nation, stripped of marketing and the omnipresent katanas of the Tokugawa Period. There are as many Japan as there are Japanese, and the misfortunes and tribulations suffered in this hemisphere are endured over there under the coordinates of their cultural context. In a context in which the sweet character of Father Coloma (Ratón Pérez) has not been able to penetrate, we are reminded that, in childhood, there are mythical stories more transcendental than those told by our parents or relatives in sleepless nights. We are talking about the living narrations, of flesh and bone, embodied in the beings we love and admire as children. When not even your mother wanted to have you, you become someone like us.
Therefore, it is infertile to lecture on the intensity degrees of filial love, a fact that anguished Nobuyo deeply. Furthermore, it is a futility to aspire to quantify if the family that has been given to us, arbitrarily, is more loved than the one we choose, coming to it long after birth. For a child of Yuri’s or Shota’s age, anyone can be family if they receive from them an affective and respectful treatment... anyone. Even a thief. If insisted on ignoring such an elementary and foundational premise of the human psyche, there will only remain the recalcitrant grief of a lonely girl, already forgotten by her abusive father and her abused mother, who with a tender voice recites us the songs of numbers (to learn to count) taught by the monstrous family that kidnapped her for months (making her feel loved). There shall be left her sweet polychrome sketches of a visit to the beach. The candid melancholy of such a girl, seems to want to please the vertigo while holding the railing of a balcony that resembles where everything started. In her retina, the memory of feeling part of something still sparkles, despite the fact that she lived so far away then from her real family... In her memory, the immortal flight of his brother Shota still gleams...
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9
mainstreamkidMar 14, 2019
Shoplifters is beautiful, comfortable, heart-breaking and honest. I'm not forgetting these performances anytime soon and this film is definitely going to stay on my mind for a while.

You can feel how strong the connection between the
Shoplifters is beautiful, comfortable, heart-breaking and honest. I'm not forgetting these performances anytime soon and this film is definitely going to stay on my mind for a while.

You can feel how strong the connection between the characters is and it's amazing how powerful this film was able to be with so little. Humble locations, realistic dialogue, minimal soundtrack.

Shoplifters is a subtle emotional surprise. A beautiful, comfortable, emotional surprise that I regret having taken so long to see.
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