Universal Pictures | Release Date: October 9, 2015
7.1
USER SCORE
Generally favorable reviews based on 472 Ratings
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Positive:
348
Mixed:
68
Negative:
56
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8
BrianMcCriticFeb 18, 2016
This film is brilliantly written by Aaron Sorkin with terrific performances from Michael Fassbender and Kate Winslet. Be prepared this film is pretty much just dialogue. Dialogue that teaches you everything about the lead character. A-
5 of 5 users found this helpful50
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9
elitefourJan 10, 2016
Let´s face it. Some people doesn´t dislike this film at all,they hate Steve Jobs,one of the most irritating person of all time who made billions of dollar due to it´s ego and inteligence.
A biopic of him sounds like something almost nobody
Let´s face it. Some people doesn´t dislike this film at all,they hate Steve Jobs,one of the most irritating person of all time who made billions of dollar due to it´s ego and inteligence.
A biopic of him sounds like something almost nobody would like to watch.
But Extraordinaire Director Danny Boyle (Trainspotting,Slumdog Millionaire) controlled 3 moments of steve jobs life that were crucial. And i know,it doesnt show the beginning of Jobs and wozniak with too much detail,but i guess they didn´want to do again what Hollywood had showed in Kutcher´s Jobs.
Yes,Jobs is two hours of complaining,but at least show us who and how was steve jobs,not all what he has done...Fassbender,Daniels,Rogen (surprisingly)and Winslet shine in this project...and all thanks to Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin and Director Danny Boyle.
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3 of 3 users found this helpful30
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9
ydnar4Dec 22, 2015
Steve Jobs was a man who made a huge impact on millions of lives all over the world despite most people not knowing much about the man who made their PC or their IPhone. Steve Jobs also deserved a worthy biopic about his life as well, whichSteve Jobs was a man who made a huge impact on millions of lives all over the world despite most people not knowing much about the man who made their PC or their IPhone. Steve Jobs also deserved a worthy biopic about his life as well, which he sadly did not get with Ashton Kutcher's version. This film was film with talent in front and behind the camera and that is why it is so effective.

I must start with the great screenplay by Aaron Sorkin, who is my favorite for best screenplay so far at this years Oscars. Sorkin crafted some of the best dialogue in a film this year. The film is written in just three different time periods rather than just play right through Steve Jobs' life.

Now Michael Fassbender is outstanding as Steve Jobs and there is never a moment where you feel that he is acting. He was Steve Jobs in this film. I know a lot of people were commenting on Fassbender not looking very similar to Jobs but that never bothered me. Fassbender's performance says so much about this man and I'm sure that he will have to get some attention for best actor this year and as of right now he just might have my vote.

Now for the supporting cast. Seth Rogen was great, I thought he was maybe going to struggle with this role, but there is nothing I like more than an actor breaking his typecasting and he did it here. There are several scenes here the Rogen holds his own against Fassbender and the same can be said about Jeff Daniels and Kate Winslet. Winslet will surely be nominated for an Oscar as well.

Danny Boyle did not exactly steal the show like he sometimes does in his films. This seemed more like a showcase for Michael Fassbender and Aaron Sorkin than anyone else involved and that certainly doesn't drag it down. Props to Boyle for delivering on a great script and excellent performances. Undoubtedly one of the best films this year.
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2 of 2 users found this helpful20
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10
lukechristianscJan 17, 2016
Boyle's film is gripping and Aaron Sorkin's screenplay is flourishing, not to mention the film's score by Daniel Pemberton has tension. The talented Michael Fassbender owns the rule of Steve Jobs also makes a beyond brilliant performance soBoyle's film is gripping and Aaron Sorkin's screenplay is flourishing, not to mention the film's score by Daniel Pemberton has tension. The talented Michael Fassbender owns the rule of Steve Jobs also makes a beyond brilliant performance so does Kate Winzlet, Jeff Daniels and Seth Rogen. The film takes place in three acts, Jobs is back stage preparing for three launch products: the Macintosh in 1984, the Next Computer in 1988, and the iMac in 1998, and in the iMac in 1998, after Jobs had been fired from Apple and then brought back in utter vindication to the company he co founded. People who make a dent in the universe usually do serious damage to their relationships. Through the years, Jobs battles his ex-girlfriend (Katherine Waterston) denying the paternity test of their daughter Lisa, with his longtime partner Steve Wozniak (Seth Rogen) his programmer (Michael Stuhlbarg), and with the professional manager he brought in to run the company, Pepsi's John Sculley (Jeff Daniels). He agonizes over the double rejection of being put into adoption and then being brought back by the first people who tried to adopt him. Sorkin's screenplay is smart and Boyle has exhilarating style. It's one of the best films of the year including one of the best performances so far. Grade A+ Expand
2 of 2 users found this helpful20
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9
TributeManJan 18, 2016
Alan Sorkin = scenariusz wart każdej nagrody.

Steve Jobs to nie kolejny film biograficzny ukazujący na końcu śmierć tytułowego bohatera. To byłoby zbyt proste. Nie ukrywa tego kim tak na prawdę Jobs był, jakie problemy miał i co musiał
Alan Sorkin = scenariusz wart każdej nagrody.

Steve Jobs to nie kolejny film biograficzny ukazujący na końcu śmierć tytułowego bohatera. To byłoby zbyt proste. Nie ukrywa tego kim tak na prawdę Jobs był, jakie problemy miał i co musiał robić, żeby osiągnąć sukces. Dlatego rozumiem rozczarowanie wielu osób po obejrzeniu Steva Jobsa. W mojej osobistej opinii jest to film bardzo dobry. Zaskoczył mnie przede wszystkim sposobem opowiedzenia historii. Danny Boyle (reżyser) wybrał 3 przełomowe momenty z życia głównego bohatera, żeby skupić się psychice Jobsa, a nie jego kariery.
Moim zdaniem film obowiązkowy do zobaczenia.
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2 of 2 users found this helpful20
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5
The3AcademySinsNov 2, 2019
I am a big Aaron Sorkin fan, but Steve Jobs is probably the worst thing he has ever done. The story is so strangely cliche, it's over melodramatic, and the dramatic payoff is somehow simultaneously unbelievable and a huge let down. MichaelI am a big Aaron Sorkin fan, but Steve Jobs is probably the worst thing he has ever done. The story is so strangely cliche, it's over melodramatic, and the dramatic payoff is somehow simultaneously unbelievable and a huge let down. Michael Fassbender gives an okay performance, but he makes Steve Jobs come off as a gigantic, passionless jerk for no reason. This movie is too boring, too long, too predictable, and has entirely too much scenery chewing that tries to disguise itself as dramatic action. The movie is produced competently, but it's completely unremarkable. Expand
2 of 2 users found this helpful20
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10
leejoice10Jan 23, 2016
Steve Jobs, arguably the most impactful pioneer in recent history, began to picture his most iconic product – the iPod, later iPhone – when he started to build on himself before his product; it's a story of finding the hardware before theSteve Jobs, arguably the most impactful pioneer in recent history, began to picture his most iconic product – the iPod, later iPhone – when he started to build on himself before his product; it's a story of finding the hardware before the design.
It is exactly at the moment when the man, who is obsessed with elegance in his designs and knows he is a big name, confesses to his daughter, saying, “I’m poorly made,” that changed everything about the movie for me. I definitely think it is one of the most stunning quotes from a movie.
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1 of 1 users found this helpful10
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8
CineAutoctonoFeb 5, 2016
"Steve Jobs" was an interesting movie , but was only reported in the moments before your important presentations in the years 84 ' , 88 ' and 98 ' and there was a little interesting , was excellent, and even perfomance of Michael Fassbender,"Steve Jobs" was an interesting movie , but was only reported in the moments before your important presentations in the years 84 ' , 88 ' and 98 ' and there was a little interesting , was excellent, and even perfomance of Michael Fassbender, and Kate Winslet that like me. Expand
1 of 1 users found this helpful10
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9
DzimasFeb 6, 2016
I guess it all comes down to how you want to remember Steve Jobs -- the guru who inspired a following of devoted Apple users or a self-absorbed entrepreneur who seized the moment, leaving behind him a trail of disgruntled co-founders, workersI guess it all comes down to how you want to remember Steve Jobs -- the guru who inspired a following of devoted Apple users or a self-absorbed entrepreneur who seized the moment, leaving behind him a trail of disgruntled co-founders, workers and former lovers. This movie takes the latter approach, but contrary to what some may think, Boyle and Sorkin make Jobs human, richly so in fact, and I think in time even those who have criticized this movie will come to regard it as the best testament of his legacy.

Whether or not Lisa was his daughter matters little. What matters is how Lisa becomes the muse around which Jobs built his ideas. From the start, the Apple was designed to be a user-friendly home computer that would become the "bicycle" for our ideas. A young Lisa immediately seizes its potential and in three highly-charged acts she also becomes Steve's sharpest critic. She represents the generation that has been brought up on the PC and is now shaping it into an image of themselves through the Internet.

Woz is Jobs' foil throughout the movie, determined to make Steve give the core Apple team its due, long after Jobs has dismissed this crew as B-players. This will no doubt rankle the Techies who probably don't see Jobs as anything more than over-hyped promoter. In fact, Woz accuses him of that in the movie, to which Jobs responds that he is the conductor and Woz is one of the musicians, first row of course.

The most interesting character is Joanna, a largely fictional construction who becomes Jobs "work wife" over the course of the film, reminding him of his moral responsibilities. This is probably what miffed Jobs' real wife, who is not even mentioned in this film. But, the filmmakers chose to take a theatrical approach, narrowing the essential characters down to a handful and building Jobs' life around them.

You can quibble with the authenticity of the film, but that's not what's at stake here. This is more about what made Steve Jobs tick. What drove him to be the leading innovator in the PC industry and how he reconciled this with those around him? I have to hand it to Boyle and Sorkin to turn this into a richly entertaining film that held this viewer spellbound throughout.
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1 of 1 users found this helpful10
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7
Tony1984Jan 17, 2018
A three act play written by Aaron Sorkin. Sorkin can only write in one way. That is very long shots especially whilst moving with emotion as exposition and streams and streams of dialogue. Most of it superfluous and delivered in inauthenticA three act play written by Aaron Sorkin. Sorkin can only write in one way. That is very long shots especially whilst moving with emotion as exposition and streams and streams of dialogue. Most of it superfluous and delivered in inauthentic manner. No ums or ahhs of normal conversation. In other words fake. Secondly Fassbender isn't a great fit for Jobs physically or in speech mannerism. Still despite all that I enjoyed it. The daughter and her relationship with Jobs is well played and the eccentric awfulness of Jobs, while overdone , is in plain sight and fairly treated. His rapacious idiotic ex isn't spared any blushes either. I don't think Jobs hold on the popular imagination has much more milage and if people want a more in depth view into his life than books are the best source but as cinematic sign off. Boyle’s Steve Jobs will do. Expand
1 of 1 users found this helpful10
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4
joelgreenbergNov 1, 2015
I have seen a lot of Sorkin's work and, alas, this reinforces my growing impatience with his inability to create people who speak in different voices from each other. That, and the relentless walking that seems to be the action of this film -I have seen a lot of Sorkin's work and, alas, this reinforces my growing impatience with his inability to create people who speak in different voices from each other. That, and the relentless walking that seems to be the action of this film - a la West Wing and pretty much everything else he writes, made for an exhausting cinema experience - and not in a good way. I found the portrait of Jobs, about whom I know little, as uninteresting as it was unilluminating. Why people kept coming back to be abused by Jobs was disturbing - was everyone in his sphere so in awe and so helpless? Expand
7 of 8 users found this helpful71
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5
leaveitNov 6, 2015
If you like people walking down halls, reciting lines that can only be delivered like in a high school play or a reading of Green Eggs and Ham even by the best actors, and passive-aggressive slam pieces about celebrity figures, go ahead andIf you like people walking down halls, reciting lines that can only be delivered like in a high school play or a reading of Green Eggs and Ham even by the best actors, and passive-aggressive slam pieces about celebrity figures, go ahead and see this and every Aaron Sorkin thing ever made. If you either didn't see Jobs or Steve Jobs: Man in the Machine or need to contribute more to overblowing this mildly intelligent, morally gray and overcredited computer engineer's popularity, just go for a Sunday matinee.

If this thing is even nominated for an Oscar I'm going to feel like eating my own head. So unoriginal, so overwrought (as another reviewer commented), such a throwaway subject. Should Sorkin do a movie about Kim Kardashian next because she is popular? What other scenarios can we have characters unrealistically spouting cringeworthy dialogue in fast foward that sounds like an English major put it through 10 drafts before the actor delivered it? Will Danny Boyle ever stop doing that slightly tilted camera shot? Will Jeff Daniels ever stop playing a guy in a suit in a boardroom? Answering these questions should be about as thought provoking as considering Steve Jobs's life.
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6 of 7 users found this helpful61
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4
DemoraseDec 25, 2015
I didn't know much about Steve Jobs' personal life outside of his public persona and I still don't after watching this, which for a movie called "Steve Jobs" is a pretty big failure to me. There are so many flaws with the concept of theI didn't know much about Steve Jobs' personal life outside of his public persona and I still don't after watching this, which for a movie called "Steve Jobs" is a pretty big failure to me. There are so many flaws with the concept of the movie... First off, you basically have to have read his biography to understand what the heck is even going on which is a lot to ask from the viewer, secondly it's not even interesting it's the same 40 minute scene repeated 3 times with little variation. No character development, no story, no nothing, just people pissed at that one guy that's it. Even Fassbender's performance which received massive praise is nothing special if you've seen him in other movies, he's a very charismatic actor but it's not like he's stretching his range by any mean here it's the same thing he always does, there's no point in the movie where you think "this is Steve Jobs". Expand
5 of 6 users found this helpful51
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7
ahnehnoisOct 19, 2015
It's a weird movie. I'd call it a pretty poor biopic, but then it seems not really intended to fill that niche anyway. Instead, it's a philosophical piece on the nature of genius. Does great progress require that one dreamer be so stubbornIt's a weird movie. I'd call it a pretty poor biopic, but then it seems not really intended to fill that niche anyway. Instead, it's a philosophical piece on the nature of genius. Does great progress require that one dreamer be so stubborn and such an **** that nothing will take his eyes off the prize?

There are elements of truth, but many of the factual details are just wrong, and it's hard to say whether the character in the film is a fair portrait of the real man or not. Michael Fassbender does not particularly look or sounds like Steve Jobs, but he's certainly playing something interesting. The odd notion of using hurried discussions before product launches as a framing device is a pretty effective tool, but renders the film incomplete. After all, there were many more important things that happened than can fit into the length of the film.

It's a Danny Boyle joint, so you know it's high energy and fun to watch. Go in with measured expectations and you're likely to be happy.
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4 of 5 users found this helpful41
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6
LamontRaymondOct 13, 2015
The first "event" movie of 2015 that I feel has been terribly overrated. It's got a few powerful moments, but as one of the critics noted, it feels like a bunch of product launches strung together, and it lacks that spark of magic that madeThe first "event" movie of 2015 that I feel has been terribly overrated. It's got a few powerful moments, but as one of the critics noted, it feels like a bunch of product launches strung together, and it lacks that spark of magic that made The Social Network so special. I will say that Kate Winslett is phenomenal in the film. I think Sorkin is MUCH better with TV. Expand
7 of 9 users found this helpful72
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0
KayJOct 25, 2015
An absolute yawn. The "weaving in" of elements from Walter Issacson's dry and scathing book fall as short as said publication did in portraying the full depth of Steve Jobs. Fact-checking was obviously not a priority for Aaron Sorkin in thisAn absolute yawn. The "weaving in" of elements from Walter Issacson's dry and scathing book fall as short as said publication did in portraying the full depth of Steve Jobs. Fact-checking was obviously not a priority for Aaron Sorkin in this - yet again - character assassination of the man behind Apple. I did watch the entire debacle, but had it have been on the small screen this production would not have passed my ten minute test. Expand
12 of 16 users found this helpful124
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0
mertz109Oct 25, 2015
Disappointing and unrewarding. I was looking forward to this movie... I figured how could you go wrong when an epic story of failure-to-triumph already happened in real life.

When the movie ended in the theatre, instead of cheers or
Disappointing and unrewarding. I was looking forward to this movie... I figured how could you go wrong when an epic story of failure-to-triumph already happened in real life.

When the movie ended in the theatre, instead of cheers or satisfaction, I heard several people say out loud, "Wait... what?" or "Wait... that's not the end, is it?"

Not a good sign.

I went to dinner afterwards and I was trying to figure out what was wrong with the movie... a movie that had ZERO impact on me whatsoever.

Nobody is going to say that it was poorly acted - they had an A+ cast and they all did a great job with what they were given. There wasn't any bad dialogue or moments where you groan at how something is presented...

It wasn't poor execution of anything... it was the complete lack of story telling and character development...

The movie was just one scene after another of intense dialogue and no story elements whatsoever.

I know everyone hates the idea of a formula, but every great TV show or movie follows the following pattern:

You get a glimpse into the current life of the main character. You see them somehow unfairly wronged (so you feel sympathy for them and bond with them).

An opportunity presents itself and the main character pursues that... and then, about 10% into the movie, the real quest begins...

Through the course of the movie, we watch the main character pursue their main goal and deal with the challenges that come up in the meantime -- challenges that force the main character to push past his inner and outer challenges more than he/she ever has before.

At the 50% point in the movie, you reach a "point of no return", where the character can't go back to their old life / old way of being, even if they wanted to...

The rest of the movie winds up at an ultimate test where the main character has to fully and irrevocably step into their new self and overcome their most challenging inner block.

EVERY good movie and TV show has this. Star Wars. Breaking Bad. Dead Poet Society. Fight Club. The 40 Year Old Virgin.

(I'm not saying those are all the best movies/TV shows ever, I'm just illustrating the breadth of content that all follows this format.)

This movie did none of the key storytelling milestones, so you end up watching two hours of characters who you couldn't give a flying f*** about arguing with each other about subject matter you have zero investment in as an audience member.

One of my tests as to whether it's a good movie or not is if one of the main characters got shot dead in a scene, would I care?

In this movie, a bomb could have dropped on every product launch and I couldn't have cared less.

If you haven't seen the movie, please do... I'm tired of seeing movies like this that lack any satisfying substance get high rating on Metacritic and Rotten Tomatoes...

You think movie studios with 9 figure budgets don't know how to fudge ratings on these things? Of course they do!!! So please, watch the movie and rate it accordingly...
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9 of 12 users found this helpful93
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7
AxgrinderNov 21, 2015
I’m not an Apple guy and I knew little about Steve Jobs prior to seeing this movie. I thought the movie was mildly “interesting.” It depicts Jobs as both a “marketing genius” who saved the company from bankruptcy and a thoughtless ass-pipe,I’m not an Apple guy and I knew little about Steve Jobs prior to seeing this movie. I thought the movie was mildly “interesting.” It depicts Jobs as both a “marketing genius” who saved the company from bankruptcy and a thoughtless ass-pipe, who was unkind and uncaring toward pretty much everyone human being in his life. I’ve been told that the movie skips over large segments of Job’s life, and thus some feel the movie is unbalanced or an unfair in its portrayal of him, while others have told me that the guy was, in many ways, even more bizzare than what the movie shows. All in all, I think it’s fair to say that the movie attempts to give you a sense of who he was without laboring over every detail. I leave it to others to debate the accuracy of the material presented, but if you’re an Apple aficionado, you may not care for this movie because it colors pretty much all of the company founders as timid or inept buffoons who couldn’t run business selling beer to beach goers in July, much less a computer company. Expand
3 of 4 users found this helpful31
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7
DatamariNov 12, 2015
It's ok.
Steve Jobs has a great theme, showing how far you need to go to achieve greatness. However, Steve Jobs as a movie is underwhelming. The story is very crooked, and Mr. Jobs himself is a very unlikable character, and isn't the
It's ok.
Steve Jobs has a great theme, showing how far you need to go to achieve greatness. However, Steve Jobs as a movie is underwhelming. The story is very crooked, and Mr. Jobs himself is a very unlikable character, and isn't the inspiring protagonist that everybody likes; not even an anti-hero. There are some boring parts, and in a movie where the directors wanted it to be inspiring, it made it hard to be inspired when you just see angry business men shouting crap at each other.
Overall, while this movie can be inspiring and powerful, and in no way bad, there are some parts that struggled to be engaging. If you want to go see this movie, by all means, go see it; it's just disappointing, and I expected better from Boyle and Sorkin. Ultimately, this movie is just meh.

Steve Jobs gets a 7/10.
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5 of 7 users found this helpful52
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1
Flange77Oct 24, 2015
Two hours of relentless, overwrought, annoying, repetitive conversations between angry people you care nothing about. A hugely disappointing, unrealistic, lazy mess of a movie.
12 of 17 users found this helpful125
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10
jordandw22Oct 16, 2015
Full disclosure, I am an Aaron Sorkin sympathizer. His critics (who are steadfast in their grudge against Sorkin) be damned, this is another masterful bit of storytelling. On its face value, a movie about three separate tech launches in theFull disclosure, I am an Aaron Sorkin sympathizer. His critics (who are steadfast in their grudge against Sorkin) be damned, this is another masterful bit of storytelling. On its face value, a movie about three separate tech launches in the world of Steve Jobs has potential to be somewhat of a bore. But this striking and impassioned acting and writing display is nothing short of pure adrenaline. If you have any appreciation for the written word and how it can move like music when put in the hands of the right actors and director, then there's no way you walk away from this movie unsatisfied. The arc does a great job of illustrating the cunning determination in Jobs' pursuit of perfection, and how he used his genius to, both, trample over those that stood in his way and defy those championing the safe investment of sticking to the status quo. They may have glossed over how or whether he mended relationships with those he cast aside - and were vital to his success - but the end result was a moving picture of a flawed genius. Not every movie has to make you feel like your protagonist should be worshiped, and I don't believe this story does, but it makes you feel something about standing for your principles. And there are plenty of times not compromising on your principles can destroy you or the people around you (Jobs certainly did plenty of this), but, I believe, it's fair to say there were at least a few times his uncompromising/self-absorbed persona helped change the world - and it's all right to marvel that. Expand
11 of 16 users found this helpful115
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5
csw12Dec 24, 2015
An overacted, over dramatic mess for the most part. Aside from a few good scenes, the entire movie felt like an argument that never stopped. The acting is solid and music helped at times but overall an average biopic at best.
2 of 3 users found this helpful21
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3
royphishoohFeb 15, 2016
Incredibly boring film. It seems Jobs spent his entire life attending new product presentations. I don't like Apple products but I wanted to know more about this extraordinary man - unfortunately I feel I learned nothing about him from this 2Incredibly boring film. It seems Jobs spent his entire life attending new product presentations. I don't like Apple products but I wanted to know more about this extraordinary man - unfortunately I feel I learned nothing about him from this 2 hours of tedium. Expand
2 of 3 users found this helpful21
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1
ChurchilljillOct 25, 2015
I am totally AMAZED that this movie is not rated a bomb across the board! Tedious and contrived. Let's have dialogues that are not particularly good "tell the story" vs. employing good movie making. And the title of the movie should haveI am totally AMAZED that this movie is not rated a bomb across the board! Tedious and contrived. Let's have dialogues that are not particularly good "tell the story" vs. employing good movie making. And the title of the movie should have included his daughter, Lisa, as that is what this is pivoting around - not that this is not important - but really great intricacy's of the man were completely not shown. Read "Becoming Steve Jobs" - this is the real deal on who Steve Jobs was, flaws and all, but balanced. Expand
7 of 11 users found this helpful74
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0
SweaterGuyOct 27, 2015
It just feels so directed" and over-acted. Enough of the endless face shots of angst. I just don't get all the hype of this film. It is the dog of the season.
7 of 11 users found this helpful74
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0
Stanely626Oct 25, 2015
This movie was a HUGE disappointment. There isn't any kind of character development, and Steve Job's life is pretended to be summarized to very short and lame episodes of his life. You will go out of the movie not having a remote idea aboutThis movie was a HUGE disappointment. There isn't any kind of character development, and Steve Job's life is pretended to be summarized to very short and lame episodes of his life. You will go out of the movie not having a remote idea about who Steve Jobs really was. :-( Expand
8 of 13 users found this helpful85
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8
DanBurritoDec 13, 2015
Steve Jobs is an interesting film about an interesting person. Michael Fassbender was brilliant as the title character and really succeeded in portraying Jobs as unlikeable but weirdly appealing and charismatic at the same time. Seth Rogen,Steve Jobs is an interesting film about an interesting person. Michael Fassbender was brilliant as the title character and really succeeded in portraying Jobs as unlikeable but weirdly appealing and charismatic at the same time. Seth Rogen, Kate Winslet, Jeff Danials and Michael Stuhlbarg were all great as well. They all deserve Oscar nominations! Looking at what went on backstage at the launch of various important Apple products, the movie focuses on Steve Jobs' relationships with his co-workers and with his daughter. The movie is never boring despite being set almost entirely in different rooms and corridors. The dialogue is rapid and really compelling. In short, Steve Jobs is an intriguing look at one of the great pioneers of technology. Expand
3 of 5 users found this helpful32
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8
YellowKirbyDec 13, 2015
A lot of people say this is boring and repetitive, but I think that people just don't understand the movie. It's not supposed like a big-budget blockbuster movie, it's just supposed to tell the story of three different moments in Jobs' life.A lot of people say this is boring and repetitive, but I think that people just don't understand the movie. It's not supposed like a big-budget blockbuster movie, it's just supposed to tell the story of three different moments in Jobs' life. It has a phenomenal cast and script, and the pacing was almost musical. One of the best movies of the year! Expand
3 of 5 users found this helpful32
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2
AxeTOct 26, 2015
What a wreck! You know how the book is always better than the movie except in a handful of cases such as: "Psycho", "The Godfather", "Jaws", maybe "The Shining"… here the book (though a biography not a novel) is about a thousand timesWhat a wreck! You know how the book is always better than the movie except in a handful of cases such as: "Psycho", "The Godfather", "Jaws", maybe "The Shining"… here the book (though a biography not a novel) is about a thousand times better. The first big mistake was Sorkin writing the script. He's not a moviemaker but a playwright and one who is in love with his own concocted witty banter and not so much interested in a good movie. It worked well for "The Social Network" but dreadfully does not here. The subject is highly verbal yes, but this film is way too much so and a director like say Polanski would have smartly thrown out half of the wall to wall dialogue.
Danny Boyle's (a director I have always liked) stabbings at a cinematic treatment of the stagy script do not work including the use of grainy film stock in the beginning and subliminal cuts to get in back story that appear as errors. These choices are a complete blunder. Michael Fassbender is an excellent actor, but incredibly I might prefer the lousy Ashton Kutcher whose portrayal in the lame "Jobs" was at least a better and more accurate overview. Kate Winslet plays an annoying contrivance of a character that is ridiculously unbalanced to the real story. And what can you say about the casting of a fat slob of a talentless over-paid lucky as **** phony actor playing Steve Wozniak? They could have cast any fat slob with a beard and that actor (or non-actor) would have done just as well or better.
The worst move of all was the silly Hollywood emphasis on Steve Job's illegitimate daughter who takes over the whole story! A story that could have and should have been epic! What about his other kids for that matter? What about his wife who he didn't find until late in life and really might have saved him from himself in many ways? The film's focus is narrow and dumb, and that is said knowing full well that dramatic license and drastic cuts and economies must be made in adapting such a book and life. This movie feels very small while something like "The Social Network" felt big. I read the biography in whole, and any other iteration imaginable would be superior to this film. Isaacson must be hugely disappointed in this hack job.
One thing is for sure, Steve Jobs would be appalled by this piss poor movie and would be livid over its shabbiness!
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7 of 12 users found this helpful75
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1
MacuserOct 24, 2015
My 30-year-old Mac Classic, my first computer ever, still works. I never had to read a single page of instructions to use any of my Macs that I owned (until 2014). Mr. jobs knew exactly what the personal computer had to be for the users,My 30-year-old Mac Classic, my first computer ever, still works. I never had to read a single page of instructions to use any of my Macs that I owned (until 2014). Mr. jobs knew exactly what the personal computer had to be for the users, long before the users ever did. He had to fight his engineers, because Mr. Jobs knew that the engineers wanted to make something different from what he wanted to make. He was a "Meister," not a money-monger CEO. Mr. Jobs came to be known to the world for his accomplishments not for his faults. I greatly appreciate his accomplishments, but not what this movie describes about him. This movie is good for someone who would enjoy seeing how a formula 1 racing car does when it plows the field. Expand
6 of 11 users found this helpful65
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0
jhepOct 28, 2015
I should confess that I WALKED OUT after just over 40 minutes of this non-stop VERY tedious Talk-fest.....the story seemed to be stuck.....paralyzed .......incapable of moving beyond its opening scene....it felt like a REALLY BAD ONE-PLAYI should confess that I WALKED OUT after just over 40 minutes of this non-stop VERY tedious Talk-fest.....the story seemed to be stuck.....paralyzed .......incapable of moving beyond its opening scene....it felt like a REALLY BAD ONE-PLAY with utterly banal dialogue and two dimensional characters.....it like watching one of the soap operas my grandmother loved so dearly in the 1960s.....and THIS from DANNY BOYLE the genius who created "Slumdog Millionaire", "127 Hours" and "28 Days Later".......that's two bombs in row Danny ("Trance" and now this )......hope you get your mojo back soon; you are an amazingly talented film maker. Expand
6 of 11 users found this helpful65
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9
wcrosherOct 26, 2015
Fast paced, incredibly directed and a performance by Fassbender that is sure to be noticed come awards season, Steve Jobs is all the right things that a biopic should be. Sorkin's script and strong performances by the entire cast make thisFast paced, incredibly directed and a performance by Fassbender that is sure to be noticed come awards season, Steve Jobs is all the right things that a biopic should be. Sorkin's script and strong performances by the entire cast make this the best movie about the co-founder of Apple to date. Expand
4 of 8 users found this helpful44
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5
WhySoSerious54Oct 26, 2015
A solid movie showing us the true Jobs. A Self loathing man who cares nothing for his family including his daughter who he removed from his life. A man who obsessed more for his vision than understand how to treat his employees. Jobs was aA solid movie showing us the true Jobs. A Self loathing man who cares nothing for his family including his daughter who he removed from his life. A man who obsessed more for his vision than understand how to treat his employees. Jobs was a marketing giant who treated his employees as bad as his family. Remember, this is a man who even after a court decided it was his daughter after numerous DNA tests decided to character assassinate his ex girlfriend in order to prove that wasn't his daughter. Who he ended up ditching for half her life until he gave her $20 million to keep his name and hired a great PR team. Don't be fooled by this media loving BS Jobs was a horrible human being. Expand
2 of 4 users found this helpful22
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0
hendrikchipmanDec 30, 2015
Apple propaganda from start to finish. I found nothing good about this movie while watching it. The whole movie focuses on Steve Jobs and exaggerates his genius. The company is obviously behind this movie and are interested in boosting AppleApple propaganda from start to finish. I found nothing good about this movie while watching it. The whole movie focuses on Steve Jobs and exaggerates his genius. The company is obviously behind this movie and are interested in boosting Apple sales. I will wait for a more accurate portrayal of Steve. Until then, this movie will not do. Expand
2 of 4 users found this helpful22
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8
nutterjrDec 29, 2015
Aaron Sorkin is a genius and Danny Boyle is a master. No wonder that their collaboration results in a piece which I did not want to end. When the credits rolled up, I was crying to see another "episode", another product launch, anotherAaron Sorkin is a genius and Danny Boyle is a master. No wonder that their collaboration results in a piece which I did not want to end. When the credits rolled up, I was crying to see another "episode", another product launch, another proof of why Steve who couldn't write code, was not an engineer nor a designer and couldn't put a hammer to a nail was called a genius a dozens of time a day... Expand
1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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10
NightReviewsFeb 3, 2016
It is often stated that the line between insanity and genius is measured only by success. When discussion turns to that of one’s genius, we find it difficult not to equate that genius with some level of insanity. This is especially true whenIt is often stated that the line between insanity and genius is measured only by success. When discussion turns to that of one’s genius, we find it difficult not to equate that genius with some level of insanity. This is especially true when that discussion focuses on Steve Jobs, the man behind machines that allows us to hold the world in the palm of our hand. Steve Jobs is not simply a film, but is an experience of perception; of history; and of a household name.

When evaluating Steve Jobs the film, one has to stop and admire the genius of writer Aaron Sorkin. The Academy Award winner extends the parameters of his brilliance through a film that not only allows us an understanding of a complex mind, but accurately illustrates the torments, criticisms and neglect that shaped the man entrusted with its ownership. Based on Walter Isaacson’s non-fiction memoir, Sorkin’s script rockets off the tongues of the film’s talented cast and grabs your attention as you dance through every nuanced conflict of Jobs’ life. Daringly mimicking theatre in its three-piece act structure, the film presents the events of three major launches, and three very different pictures of Steve Jobs (Michael Fassbender), in real time.

The first, shot in low-resolution 16mm film, set in Cupertino, California, shows a grainy and young Jobs moments before his inaugural Macintosh in 1984, days after the infamous science fiction based Apple commercial. The second, showing the recently axed Jobs, in 1988 at the historical San Francisco Opera House before his infamously disastrous NeXT cube launch in wide-screen 35mm film displays a vengeful and highly orchestrated Jobs. Finally, in 1998, returning to Apple, this time as CEO, utilising high-definition digital film at San Francisco’s Davies Symphony Hall, before his presentation of the iMac. The last act presents to the audience the most human yet morally flawed version of a man no one ever really understood. Each scene, running close to thirty five minutes each, is as enthralling, entertaining and orchestrated as the next.

Jobs has always maintained a very muddled and misguided personal life; one that includes a young daughter Lisa with a college sweetheart Christen Brennan (Katherine Waterston), very uninspiring social skills as well as a knack for being referred to as unlovable. Sorkin’s script looks to answer one of the biggest questions plaguing the late great tech genius: can a great man still be a good man? Thanks to an electric script by the great Aaron Sorkin, phenomenal performances on all fronts, masterful direction and a brilliant neo-classical score by Daniel Pemberton, Steve Jobs is easily a crowning cinematic achievement and the best film of 2015, in spite of not being the most audience alluring film released this award season.

From the beginning, the film is a pish-posh of gossip and rumours. Not that anyone thought the film would bow down to the atrocious Ashton Kutcher vehicle Jobs in 2013, but the film did suffer a slew of “technical difficulties” going into production. Once in the hands of David Fincher, the film was always setup to be as great, if not greater than The Social Network. With Christian Bale initially cast, the film went through directors, stars and crew like a Daytona racetrack, eventually settling on director Danny Boyle, and stars Michael Fassbender and Daniel Pemberton instead of a roster that may very well have included Fincher, Bale, Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross. Luckily for audiences, Steve Jobs is not an unwanted and pumped out studio biopic, and focuses less on the look of Jobs and more on the essence of a man struggling with himself more than the struggles of an economically competitive technological world.

While the film is presented in a very basic three act structure, there is nothing simple about the film. Driven by dialogue, its characters and three very crucial times in the life of Steve Jobs, the abstract delivery of these highly regarded singular events of the 20th century are presented with ease and class.

In a world where recognition is everything, and being pointed out in humiliation and failure could forever change your reputation professionally, Steve Jobs, logically speaking, had no right becoming a pioneer of technology. He was no engineer, designer or programmer, yet, the world knew his name and the ramifications of his brilliance. In one of the many powerful scenes of the film, when confronted by his cohort and early friend, Apple Co-Founder Steve “Woz” Wozniak (Seth Rogen) what he does. In response, Jobs says, “I play the orchestra!” Often times being measured next to Leonardo Da Vinci, Julius Ceasar and God himself, Jobs was often misconceived as a diabolical man with a plan, giving out the passes to whomever came in his way.
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1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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1
DOUGKOct 27, 2015
If you are a fan of Apple and Steve Jobs, you might like this movie. However, it is hard to see why anyone would like it very much. Kate Winslet is good but that is not nearly enough to carry the film which has almost nothing else toIf you are a fan of Apple and Steve Jobs, you might like this movie. However, it is hard to see why anyone would like it very much. Kate Winslet is good but that is not nearly enough to carry the film which has almost nothing else to recommend it. It is not an interesting story, not good character development, not good dialogue, not entertaining, not educational, not enlightening, nothing worth watching. I hate to agree with Rex Reed who is the most uneven critic in the country but he is right on this one. Expand
6 of 13 users found this helpful67
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0
likeitisNov 4, 2015
BORING!!!!! Too much geeky over the top blabbering. A misplaced homage to Jobs at the expense of a layman audience. A better movie would have been Jobs' place in the technology revolution. SAVE YOUR MONEY!!! Ps. MY wife and I NEVERBORING!!!!! Too much geeky over the top blabbering. A misplaced homage to Jobs at the expense of a layman audience. A better movie would have been Jobs' place in the technology revolution. SAVE YOUR MONEY!!! Ps. MY wife and I NEVER agree. We did this time Expand
4 of 9 users found this helpful45
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0
truedatNov 27, 2015
Imagine a movie where a bunch of characters you don't care about have intense but uninteresting arguments for the entire time.

That is this movie.
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4 of 9 users found this helpful45
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7
GreatMartinOct 23, 2015
With a definite Best Actor Oscar nomination for Michael Fassbender, Best Supporting actress nomination for Kate Winslet and probable nominations for screenwriter Aaron Sorkin and director Danny Boyle along with Jeff Daniels and/or Seth RogenWith a definite Best Actor Oscar nomination for Michael Fassbender, Best Supporting actress nomination for Kate Winslet and probable nominations for screenwriter Aaron Sorkin and director Danny Boyle along with Jeff Daniels and/or Seth Rogen for Best Supporting Actor I wish I could say “Steve Jobs” is a ‘must see’ movie but the most I can say is the fast smart dialogue while walking fast, a trademark of Sorkin’s, along with director Boyle’s kinetic use of the camera, aided by the soundtrack of Daniel Pemberton, add up to an interesting movie. Sorkin has written a 3 act screenplay, each act revolving around a creation by Jobs such as the Apple II, the NeXT and the iMac computers, while Doyle films the first act in 16mm film, the second in 35mm and digital for the third act.

It is generally known and accepted that Steve Jobs was a cold, dictating boss who never gave credit to anyone keeping it all for himself, gave more love to his technological creations than to any human being, never treated anyone around him fairly, was an impossible perfectionist, always composed, cool and in charge, comparing himself to G-d, Julius Caesar and seen as a bully but even those who hated him acknowledged him as a visionary.

The fact that he was adopted and given back after a month to be adopted again, being brought up as a Catholic, refused to acknowledge the birth of his own daughter until she was in her teens and his long time, non-sexual, working relationship with Joanna Hoffman (Winslet) who was one of the few who could and did stand up to him, are never dealt with in depth which may have helped explaining the man himself. We learn little about the man himself which is a big failure of the film.

There is no faulting of the actors from the three, Makenzie Moss, Ripley Sobo and Perla Haney-Jardine who play the daughter at different stages, Katherine Waterston who plays the mother, Mac collaborator Andy Hertzfeld, played by Michael Stuhlbarg, to all the supporting and bit players. Daniels takes his character from “The Newsroom” a step higher!

Fassbender IS Steve Jobs even though he may not look like him to start with eventually he is the man you have seen on large stages introducing his products. He handles the pacing of Sorkin’s words and Doyle’s camera along with the anger he feels not knowing how to deal with feelings. The relationship between Winslet and Fassbender though her loyalty to him and why he would listen to her and not others is never explained but because of the actors you accept that it is just what it appears.

For excellent acting, snappy, sharp dialogue and above average unobtrusive directing plus award conversations “Steve Jobs” is a film to see.
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3 of 7 users found this helpful34
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9
moviemitch96Oct 24, 2015
When you've got a biopic with a great, acclaimed director like Danny Boyle, an absolute genius screenwriter like Aaron Sorkin, and a brilliant A-list cast, that instantly sounds like a recipe for a great film, and that's exactly what thisWhen you've got a biopic with a great, acclaimed director like Danny Boyle, an absolute genius screenwriter like Aaron Sorkin, and a brilliant A-list cast, that instantly sounds like a recipe for a great film, and that's exactly what this film was! Michael Fassbender's a great actor and I always love his performances, but I honestly couldn't picture him taking on the role of Steve Jobs at first. However, I'm more than happy to say that he gives a performance that's without a doubt worthy of an Oscar nomination! Seth Rogen and Kate Winslet also gave memorable supporting turns and I really think they deserve Oscar nods for this as well. Sorkin's screenplay flows very smoothly with some great dialogue and back and forth exchanges between characters throughout. And Boyle's direction is as confident as ever. Overall, it's certainly not the best biopic, but I can say that it's definitely up there with some of the best films I've seen all year! Expand
3 of 7 users found this helpful34
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10
joef123Oct 25, 2015
Absolutely brilliant. This script is amazing and so far is my choice for Best Adapted Screenplay at the Oscars, and will be surprised if it isn't on Oscar night. The cast is great especially, Fassbender, Winslet, Daniels and Rogen. MyAbsolutely brilliant. This script is amazing and so far is my choice for Best Adapted Screenplay at the Oscars, and will be surprised if it isn't on Oscar night. The cast is great especially, Fassbender, Winslet, Daniels and Rogen. My favorite movie of the year so far. Go see it! Expand
3 of 7 users found this helpful34
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7
j1trainOct 31, 2015
Oddly structured around recurring arguments at three major product launches, it plays more like a stylized history lesson in parts. Still, the cast is phenomenal and the script is often exciting and funny even if it does dip into ridiculousOddly structured around recurring arguments at three major product launches, it plays more like a stylized history lesson in parts. Still, the cast is phenomenal and the script is often exciting and funny even if it does dip into ridiculous melodrama. Expand
3 of 7 users found this helpful34
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3
Brent_MarchantNov 19, 2015
A biopic that rings hollow and phony from start to finish. Yes, we're well aware of the title character's shady reputation from news reports and other films, but this stagey, pretentious, poorly written and at times needlessly cryptic accountA biopic that rings hollow and phony from start to finish. Yes, we're well aware of the title character's shady reputation from news reports and other films, but this stagey, pretentious, poorly written and at times needlessly cryptic account of his life becomes truly laughable and tiresome. Michael Fassbender's overwrought, constantly mugging for the camera performance screams "I dare you not to nominate me for an Oscar for this portrayal" (sheesh). Were it not for the solid supporting performances of Kate Winslet and Jeff Daniels, there would be nothing to recommend here. It's now easy to see why the early reviews weren't so kind to this release; it doesn't deserve the praise it has received since. Expand
3 of 7 users found this helpful34
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0
JackbookproOct 11, 2015
Great if you like drama, horrible if you appreciate anything close to the truth. This movie feels like it has a very personal vendetta, and may forever ingrain a false image of a man who was certainly not an evil genius.
7 of 18 users found this helpful711
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10
oneopinion1Oct 19, 2015
Extremely well told story in a unique method. Didn't slant his personality one way or the other. It was intense from the beginning to the end. Pulled back the curtain on the life of Steve Jobs.
2 of 6 users found this helpful24
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9
tjman09Oct 23, 2015
If you go into this movie expecting a film about Steve Jobs numerous achievements in the world of technology, this isn’t quite that movie, this is more a movie about Steve Jobs the father. The film is anchored by terrific acting, characterIf you go into this movie expecting a film about Steve Jobs numerous achievements in the world of technology, this isn’t quite that movie, this is more a movie about Steve Jobs the father. The film is anchored by terrific acting, character development, and pacing, which help make the film quite enjoyable. The story revolves not around Jobs entire life, but 3 separate events, and the minutia of the rest of his life, the structure to clarify is similar to last years Birdman, and the film is very different from 2013’s Jobs.
The acting in Steve Jobs is superb, perhaps most impressive of all is Kate Winslet’s performance, as through most of the movie she transformed into her character, as did Michael Fassbender. Michael Fassbender will surely receive an Oscar nomination for this performance, as he literally transforms before the audience’s eyes. Jeff Daniels is as was expected reliable and equally as great, but may get drowned out by the other performances. The other notable performance was that of Seth Rogen, who made a turn for the dramatic, and hit a home-run, completely selling himself as Steve Wozniak.
The plot of the film is character driven, and in many ways the greatest strength of the film is the character development, especially that of Steve Jobs. Boyle and Fassbender perfectly capture the psychotic, frenetic, genius, bipolar attitude of Steve Jobs, while also showing a great character arch, as he evolves as a person. The film could have been a little too melodramatic, but the direction and acting save it. The acting and character development also help form the surprisingly frenetic pacing of the film. The film is paced like a day in a beehive, where every character is running in circles, never taking a moment to breath.
On top of all of the acting, character development, and pacing the film is also funny, at times touching, and different from the other Jobs films. The film represents an award caliber performance by screenwriter Aaron Sorkin, director Danny Boyle, and most of the cast. The only complaint may be the film’s computer and business lingo is occasionally, not often but occasionally, too confusing for a non computer whiz to understand. Using great character development, acting, and pacing Steve Jobs is another great entry in Danny Boyle’s ever impressive filmography.
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8
TVJerryOct 29, 2015
Unlike the typical biopic, screenwriter Aaron Sorkin has set this one backstage just before the launch of 3 different products (Macintosh, NeXT, iMac). While the tech gets a nod, the focus is on the man and his relationships with 3 primaryUnlike the typical biopic, screenwriter Aaron Sorkin has set this one backstage just before the launch of 3 different products (Macintosh, NeXT, iMac). While the tech gets a nod, the focus is on the man and his relationships with 3 primary people (Steve Wozniak, John Sculley, his daughter Lisa). Sorkin has brilliantly combined a lot of information into a crowded, time-limited backdrop. Director Danny Boyle has added a frantic, intimate style to keep the focus on the people (all of whom are superb, esp. Michael Fassbender in the title role and Kate Winslet as his "work wife"). While demonstrating Jobs' genius, this film clearly shows his gruff professional style and challenges with relationships. A fascinating, informative and compelling glimpse into his life. Expand
2 of 6 users found this helpful24
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9
RvwFromUpHereNov 1, 2015
Who: Michael Fassbender, Dale Denton, and that girl in Titanic who was too selfish to share her door with a drowning Leonardo DiCaprio
What: An enjoyable film similar to The Social Network but not quite as good
Where: The auditoriums where
Who: Michael Fassbender, Dale Denton, and that girl in Titanic who was too selfish to share her door with a drowning Leonardo DiCaprio
What: An enjoyable film similar to The Social Network but not quite as good
Where: The auditoriums where Steve Jobs' three most iconic product launches took place
When (can I watch again): 1-2 months
Why: If you thought The Newsroom was cancelled prematurely, and Kelso from That 70's Show is not an adequate portrayal of a genius billionaire/entrepreneur, then this movie is for you
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2 of 6 users found this helpful24
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7
MrsBNov 13, 2015
Mr&MrsB were unsure if this all held together - too much verbal cleverness, and not enough humanity at the centre of it all.
I thought Fassbender was great - Mr wasn't sure if he had enough star quality.
But a fun film nonetheless. Our
Mr&MrsB were unsure if this all held together - too much verbal cleverness, and not enough humanity at the centre of it all.
I thought Fassbender was great - Mr wasn't sure if he had enough star quality.
But a fun film nonetheless.
Our full reviews are at our 'Mr and Mrs Blogs' blog
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1 of 3 users found this helpful12
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8
FilmGobNov 20, 2015
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Steve Jobs takes us behind the scenes of the digital revolution, a portrait of the man at its epicenter. The story unfolds backstage at three iconic product launches, ending in 1998 with the unveiling of the iMac.

Directed by Danny Boyle, from a screenplay by Aaron Sorkin, this biopic could easily have been David Fincher at the helm starring Christian Bale or Leonardo DiCaprio, but settling on Boyle to direct and Michael Fassbender as the Jobs is no slack reshuffle. I went in with low expectations despite the quality in cast and crew, due to reports of a limited release now cancelled in the US. As a tech fan i feel it's came too soon, only two years since the poor Ashton Kutcher effort and five years since the death of Jobs.

However, despite those criticisms, Boyle and Sorkin have created a highly entertaining drama. Although Fassbender may not look like the Apple mastermind, the mannerisms, voice and overall performance are spot on. You believe him as the arrogant visionary behind the products who will bully his team so he can have his face on Time magazine. Yet we also see the reluctant father, finding it difficult to break down emotional barriers, and eventually making it right with his daughter before it's too late.

The solid supporting cast includes Jeff Daniels as CEO John Sculley, Seth Rogan as the co-founder and betrayed friend Steve Wozniak, but i was most impressed with Kate Winslet's role as Jobs' right hand marketing woman Joanna Hoffman, chatting and arguing in a soft Polish accent mixed with American English. All of them bounce and clash with Fassbender's commanding Jobs, almost like a dance of egos.

Most biopics take artistic license to tell a story over reality, and that nagging feeling never really leaves when watching this. However the unconventional narrative and structure presented here is what makes it stand out. The film is broken into three segments, each filmed in a different format. The Apple Macintosh launch in 1984 is filmed in 16mm, the NeXT computer reveal of 1988 is in 35mm, and the iMac event from 1998 was filmed in today's digital format. It's not obvious at first but certainly will be appreciated in repeat viewings.

There is of course a slight repetitiveness to the events but the two hours runtime flew by. The intense tone comes and goes, with great dialogue and humour. The retro, synthesised score matches up brilliantly and plays a big part for key scenes, sometimes beating softly and other times reaching a crescendo.

Danny Boyle's 'Steve Jobs' is a tribute to a man that was difficult to figure out, second guess. It's a window to a time in our recent history, so important to our future, shaped by someone we'll never see the likes of again within the tech industry.
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10
SuperJG123Nov 24, 2015
Steve Jobs is a amusing archetype of biopic movie history. It's a movie mitochondria. Best acting. Best climax. Best settings. Best effort. It can win so many oscars and golden globes and I guarantee it will. The point of view looks so significant.
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6
AleksWloNov 27, 2015
Interesting production. Very nice shots, good acting (especially incredible Fassbender), interesting form of editing but... that was not enough. The plot is cut in entertaining but it was focused only on character and personalities. I think iInteresting production. Very nice shots, good acting (especially incredible Fassbender), interesting form of editing but... that was not enough. The plot is cut in entertaining but it was focused only on character and personalities. I think i just needed something deeper. Expand
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1
Val-835Jan 29, 2016
The first 5 minutes start with a lot of dialogue. You say, OK it will get better. Sadly, it never does. It never changes. Dialogue after dialogue after dialogue. Good actors get lost in it. By the end, you scratch your head. What was thisThe first 5 minutes start with a lot of dialogue. You say, OK it will get better. Sadly, it never does. It never changes. Dialogue after dialogue after dialogue. Good actors get lost in it. By the end, you scratch your head. What was this movie all about ? What did it try to tell us ? How come people as smart as these directors and writers can get it so wrong ? To me, it's a mystery. Expand
1 of 3 users found this helpful12
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8
BHBarryOct 11, 2015
"Steve Jobs" was directed by Danny Boyle ("Slumdog Millionaire") and stars Michael Fassbender in the title role ably supported by Seth Rogen, Jeff Daniels,, Kate Winslet, Michael Stuhlberg and Katherine Waterston. Written by Aaron Sorkin, the"Steve Jobs" was directed by Danny Boyle ("Slumdog Millionaire") and stars Michael Fassbender in the title role ably supported by Seth Rogen, Jeff Daniels,, Kate Winslet, Michael Stuhlberg and Katherine Waterston. Written by Aaron Sorkin, the film attempts to tell the story of this genius at helping people communicate with each other through the digital age while himself never quite coming to grips with his own personal demons. The vehicle for the film is the backstage goings on for the 3 launches of Jobs’ products, i.e. the Mac, the NEXT and the iMac. The same drama that precedes the hour or half hour before each launch allows Mr. Sorkin to elicit dialogue from the same five protagonists as the audience tries to follow and understand the complexities and inconsistencies of this self acclaimed icon. Similar to last year’s film, "Birdman" (though notably better), the viewer is brought backstage to the inner workings of the presentation process and, through it, the man himself. Based loosely on the Walter Isaacson biography, the film never quite captures the true essence of the man and unfortunately gives us a cleverly written but rather thin two dimensional look at the lead character. We know as little or less about Mr. Jobs after the film as we did before except that he is or can be arrogrant and callous while himself searching for the humanity that seems to always elude him. Fleeting bits of dialogue thrown in by Mr. Sorkin are apparently intended to give us some insight into the Jobs’ psyche but, unfortunately, they fail to satisfy the viewer’s intellect and curiosity. Nevertheless, the film does give a behind the scenes glimpse at the PR involved in the launching of a new product and the kind of excitement it can generate. This, together with the superb acting by this terrific cast, allows me to give this film an 8.0 rating. It’s a good film but one that, mindful of the skills and reputation of the writer and director and the subject matter they had to work with, never reaches the potential I would have hoped for and expected. Expand
2 of 8 users found this helpful26
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10
MrMovieBuffNov 14, 2015
'Steve Jobs' is a fantastic biopic that focuses on the key aspects of the life of the title character. Directed by Danny Boyle ('Trainspotting' and 'Slumdog Millionaire') and written by Aaron Sorkin ('The Social Network'), with a fantastic'Steve Jobs' is a fantastic biopic that focuses on the key aspects of the life of the title character. Directed by Danny Boyle ('Trainspotting' and 'Slumdog Millionaire') and written by Aaron Sorkin ('The Social Network'), with a fantastic lead performance by Michael Fassbender, who should be able to score a "Best Actor" nomination at the Academy Awards, 'Steve Jobs' is an engaging, and sometimes dramatic drama that opens our eyes to the Steve Jobs we see outside all of those WWDC presentations.

This movie is structured in the typical three-act method, from 1984 to 1988 and 1998. Kate Winslet plays Joanna Hoffman who assists Jobs throughout his career. She is there for him during his successes and during his downfalls. Seth Rogen plays Steve Wozniak, the co-founder of Apple Inc. next to Jobs. Their relationship is shown with tension to the point where I think Rogen might be able to get a nomination for "Best Supporting Actor".

As an admirer of Steve Jobs as a technological giant, I was surprised to see the man outside all of that showmanship and seeing him as a struggling family man and businessman.

We mostly get a glimpse of Jobs' relationship with his daughter, Lisa. At first he denies time and time again that he is her father, and as she grows up, he starts to see that she means the most to him.

Fassbender may not physically resemble Steve Jobs, but I always knew his acting would outshine his appearance the same way Tom Hanks' performance outshone his appearance in 'Saving Mr. Banks' (2013) as Walt Disney. You may not see Fassbender as Jobs, you will not even see Fassbender, what you will see is a struggling businessman trying to cope keeping his family and friends together and making sacrifice after sacrifice.

All in all, this movie is intense and engaging, 'Steve Jobs' is one of the best movies of the year.
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1 of 4 users found this helpful13
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8
TrilobiteGNov 14, 2015
It's tricky really. I could understand if someone HATED this movie to shreds. It has lacklustre pace to it. But if I am honest, this movie is totally and incredibly unique that it has to be admired. The acting, the pure physical and perfectIt's tricky really. I could understand if someone HATED this movie to shreds. It has lacklustre pace to it. But if I am honest, this movie is totally and incredibly unique that it has to be admired. The acting, the pure physical and perfect acting and dialogue is what made this movie. Nothing spoken was wasted into thin air just to fill time, it all had meaning. Oh, and again superb directing from Danny Boyle and crew...this movie looked gorgeous and it's resolution was quite beautiful if a little more heart than the 1st and 2nd act, which I would've liked to of seen. Expand
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9
NerdConsultantNov 15, 2015
Steve Jobs is and excellent movie, I absolutely adored it. If this film doesn’t receive an Oscar nomination for Best Picture, then it’s been a sorry year for The Academy. It’s brilliantly shot, it’s an excellent character piece with someSteve Jobs is and excellent movie, I absolutely adored it. If this film doesn’t receive an Oscar nomination for Best Picture, then it’s been a sorry year for The Academy. It’s brilliantly shot, it’s an excellent character piece with some amazing performances from its entire cast, especially Michael Fassbender, Kate Winslet, Jeff Daniels, Seth Rogen as well as Katherine Waterston Perla Haney-Jardine and Ripley Sobo. The first act is really good, the second act keeps it going with excellent pace, but the third act is where everything comes together and you realise what an excellent movie this is. It’s not a very traditionally structured movie and that might turn a few people off and some people may find a few things to complain about, like the historical accuracy, however, whether you go in to this film blind or not, I think you come out enjoying the movie. This is the excellent character driven movie that I have wanted to see for a long time, but has been largely absent in 2015. Expand
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8
JacobNov 16, 2015
If Jobs focused primarily on what Steve did Steve Jobs explores who Jobs was. The focus on evolving character dynamics in three specific moments gives this film a core the preceding version lacked. While the film was well done, its poorIf Jobs focused primarily on what Steve did Steve Jobs explores who Jobs was. The focus on evolving character dynamics in three specific moments gives this film a core the preceding version lacked. While the film was well done, its poor performance at the Box Office combined with upcoming major releases like the new Hunger Games will make it hard to find a screening of. If you are able to see Steve Jobs in theaters do so and if not be sure to watch it when it gets a Blu-ray/DVD release and don’t confuse with the inferior Jobs currently on Netflix. Not only is Steve Jobs likely to be essential Oscar homework; but it is a well constructed film that helps explain Jobs’ character in a way that Jobs doesn’t. Expand
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8
emkadvNov 19, 2015
I suspect most, if not all, of the dialog is pulled out of thin air. I don't see it as an accurate biopic of Jobs's life (or even the portion of it covered). Some of the jokes (the two Andy's, in particular) wear thin.

But overall, it is
I suspect most, if not all, of the dialog is pulled out of thin air. I don't see it as an accurate biopic of Jobs's life (or even the portion of it covered). Some of the jokes (the two Andy's, in particular) wear thin.

But overall, it is entertaining. Winslet's performance is outstanding, and Fassbender's is very good, too. My friends and I enjoyed it as a work of cinema, but it's no documentary. Sorkin and Boyle were more focused on telling an interesting story than a story based on fact. And they succeeded.
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8
PeterayOct 19, 2015
Good movie. I liked this movie because the acting was excellent, the dialogue (although at times technical beyond my comprehension) was fitting, and the overall movie had great momentum.

The editing and movie scores deserve their own
Good movie. I liked this movie because the acting was excellent, the dialogue (although at times technical beyond my comprehension) was fitting, and the overall movie had great momentum.

The editing and movie scores deserve their own praise. Great juxtaposition and use of flashbacks, while switching back and forth to the present, to help the viewer understand the backstory.

I would say this seemed realistic to me, and I enjoy realistic believable movies.
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8
xDaudexOct 23, 2015
Pros:
More accurately shows how Steve Jobs was than the previous movie "Jobs"
The movie is constantly tense because the vast majority of the movie takes place just before he goes on stage for a reveal This movie focuses more on his family
Pros:
More accurately shows how Steve Jobs was than the previous movie "Jobs"
The movie is constantly tense because the vast majority of the movie takes place just before he goes on stage for a reveal
This movie focuses more on his family life and makes a good story

Cons:
The movie does kind of over dramatize this portion of his life
There can be slight confusion in some scenes because of how it was filmed
The young version of Steve Jobs in this movie doesn't look quite like Steve did
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8
Movi3R3vi3werOct 25, 2015
I say give Michael Fassbender the golden statue today because I can't see any actor (other than maybe DiCaprio) giving a better performance than him in Steve Jobs. The supporting cast are all great, Kate Winslet in particular and I loved theI say give Michael Fassbender the golden statue today because I can't see any actor (other than maybe DiCaprio) giving a better performance than him in Steve Jobs. The supporting cast are all great, Kate Winslet in particular and I loved the way Danny Boyle filmed the movie. The dialogue is sharp and quick, does it get a bit repetitive a couple of times? Yes. But it's a fascinating look at the genius that was Steve Jobs. Expand
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10
Sidd_Movie_BuffOct 26, 2015
Steve Jobs is written by Aaron Sorkin and directed by Danny Boyle. It stars Micheal Fassbender, Kate Winslet, Seth Rogen, Jeff Daniels, and Michael Stuhlbarg.

Set backstage at three iconic product launches and ending in 1998 with the
Steve Jobs is written by Aaron Sorkin and directed by Danny Boyle. It stars Micheal Fassbender, Kate Winslet, Seth Rogen, Jeff Daniels, and Michael Stuhlbarg.

Set backstage at three iconic product launches and ending in 1998 with the unveiling of the iMac, Steve Jobs takes us behind the scenes of the digital revolution to paint a portrait of the man, his estranged family and staff at its epicenter.

I honestly can't start this review without saying this easily ties with my favorite movie of the year, The Gift, for quite a few reasons. Truth be told this movie has everything needed to build a classic and uses it remarkably.

Writer Aaron Sorkin has quite a few gems in his filmography which include Money Ball, Social Network and A Few Good Men. He is as versatile as he is brutal in honesty. He works wonders in this movie revealing the man behind the machine rather than the machine behind the man. Without any scenes of failure or success, Sorkin forces his audience to understand the complex and often times revolting central Character. With extremely well written confrontations between Jobs and Wozniak or Jobs and his Daughter or even Jobs and his Boss, Sorkin relentlessly demonstrates the true nature behind the tech giant. Though this movie's central family tension and the Job vs. Apple drama are enthralling, Sorkin injects just enough dry and black comedy to keep the movie from becoming an influential figure's shaming. With that being said Sorkin also understands that the enormous ego of Steve Jobs had to be exposed as a vice and plays on that brutal fact perfectly. With 4 dimensional characters, great central dramas and pitch perfect comedy, this might actually be his best work yet.

Accompanying the stellar writing was Danny Boyle's beautiful direction. Through seemingly unending shots and aggressive movements the audience genuinely feels like their in Job's presence which can be very hard to sit through at times but is ultimately rewarding experience. With visible passion from Boyle, this is one powerful ride.

To my common readers I mentioned a few weeks back that Black Mass had the greatest ensemble cast of the year, I was wrong. This movies cast never really stops acting to the point of absolute realism. To start Kate Winslet portrayal of real life Johanna Hoffman was as beautiful as it was naive. She brought the character alive in full force and truly demonstrated she is one of the best actresses working. I smell a nomination coming her way. I had referenced Jeff Daniel's acting last week in The Martian, well he completely out did himself. He was tender at times and shark-like in others. He drew the line between intelligence and decency and walks this tight rope carefully. Five year old Mekenzie Moss also offers an absolutely astounding performance, uttering few but heart wrenching words. Michael Stuhlbarg works wonder as well on a albeit smaller degree.

Now onto the two heavy hitters. A surprise to me and my theater alike, Seth Rogan gives the single best dramatic performance of his career. As Steve Wozniak, the literal opposite of Jobs, Rogan played the role with elegance and brilliance and I wouldn't even mind the Benicio snub if Rogen won the statue. The role demanded a sweet, naive, caring and ultimately explosive performance and Rogan more than delivered making the scenes of abrasion between him and Fassbender iconic.

I have been holding off that name for the entire review because Micheal Fassbender is the only thing keeping this movie from failing. He dawns the character in such a way, I can only compare it to Jake Gyllenhaal from Night Crawler and even then I don't think I could fully describe it. Filled to the brim with nuance Fassbender offers a cold, intelligent, manipulative, calculating, and over all disturbingly realistic portrayal of Steve Jobs. I really can't envision a better cast lead than him. As calm as he is diabolical, Fassbender plays this egotistical narcissist with such precision its close to horrifying to watch. Though calm through most of the movie Fassbender understands when to unleash the monster which lays in Jobs and is absolutely volcanic while doing so. Under all the deception, tyranny, and technological brilliance lays a purely adroit and masterful performance. Though Johnny Depp in Black Mass was great and Ian McClellan in Mr. Holmes was grand, neither of them embodied their characters much like Micheal Fassbender and it would be a shame and a disservice to cinema if he didn't with Best Actor. He has proved he is one of the best actors of the generation.

Steve Jobs was a privilege to see on the big screen and is so far tied with The Gift as my number one movie of the year. With Deft acting, exquisite direction, and powerful writing this movie is not far from a modern classic. Steve Jobs gets an A+.
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10
jdolan74Nov 27, 2015
The powers that be messed up the release of Steve Jobs. But I can't stop watching it. I highly recommend you find a way to see this movie. Fassbender gives the performance you've been waiting for. Winslett delivers another tour de force.The powers that be messed up the release of Steve Jobs. But I can't stop watching it. I highly recommend you find a way to see this movie. Fassbender gives the performance you've been waiting for. Winslett delivers another tour de force. Incredible ensemble. Rogen. Stuhlberg. Waterston. Daniels should finally win the Oscar. Three actresses give an unbelievable performance trifecta in the role of L.I.S.A. Three different scores defining three different periods. Boyle's direction is creative and flawless. Sorkin does what he always does. This film is a thing of beauty.

(little disclaimer - I've never owned a Mac or I-Phone. Always preferred PCs and Androids... so I wasn't predisposed to like this film. Imagine a non-baseball fan who loved Moneyball... which of course, that wasn't me... I love baseball!)
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6
foxgroveNov 15, 2015
Set backstage at the time of three different product launches in as many years: -1984; 1988 and 1998, this overly literate take concerning events in the life of the iconic Steve Jobs suffers from a screenplay that seems too pleased withSet backstage at the time of three different product launches in as many years: -1984; 1988 and 1998, this overly literate take concerning events in the life of the iconic Steve Jobs suffers from a screenplay that seems too pleased with itself by half. Divided into three acts, encompassing each year stated, the film feels theatrical in its presentation right down to the fact that most of it does actually take place on, or around, a stage. After a while all the talk begins to feel like reading a book that lacks punctuation. For the first two acts the more it plays, the more it pays in diminishing returns. This is due to the constant and rapid verbosity which, because the corporate musings don’t always seem clear, has the unfortunate effect of causing one to tune in and out as the interest wanes. Things improve decidedly in act three. Here director, writer and actors find synergy in three stand out scenes, where some humanity comes to the fore after having been noticeably absent in acts 1 and 2. As if the film is aware that it is a talk fest we are also often treated to scenes of the actors walking (and talking) down corridors.
If I have some issues with the script, which is also at times brilliant, there are no such reservations with the actors. Having appeared in two films this year (Macbeth is the other) in which his performance has been better than the movie itself, Michael Fassbender is a knockout. It matters not a jot that he doesn’t look like the real person, as his chameleon like ability to get under the skin of a character stands him in good stead. It is the essence he brings to the part that one feels. Kate Winslet is also fantastic in a larger role than anticipated. She appears de-glammed, human and without any affectations of a star. She is again wonderful.
If ever a film could be considered mixed in its achievement it is this one. Disappointing it may well be, but by the end it does sort of win you over.
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7
beingryanjudeOct 11, 2015
STEVE JOBS is not a biopic. Instead, together with Danny Boyle, Aaron Sorkin has written the trials and tribulations of Steve Jobs’ life over the course of three separate technology launches. Michael Fassbender recreates the genius of SteveSTEVE JOBS is not a biopic. Instead, together with Danny Boyle, Aaron Sorkin has written the trials and tribulations of Steve Jobs’ life over the course of three separate technology launches. Michael Fassbender recreates the genius of Steve Jobs - and allows him to finally be humanized along with all of those who were around him. Expand
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10
JMDGamotiaOct 23, 2015
Historic, technological, and generally prosperous Steve Jobs is a documentary film shown at Apple, Inc., from the early years until his death in 2011.
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7
TheKavehJOct 24, 2015
This movie had me on the edge of my seat from start to finish. The story behind Apple's former CEO, Steve Jobs, is one of the better movies of 2015. Great!
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8
FilmPhonicNov 22, 2015
‘Steve Jobs’ is thankfully not your typical biopic with its familiar and predictable cradle-to-grave structure and tiresome narrative highs & lows, Sorkin’s sharp and dynamic dialogue, coupled with familiar techniques like the ole’ walk n’‘Steve Jobs’ is thankfully not your typical biopic with its familiar and predictable cradle-to-grave structure and tiresome narrative highs & lows, Sorkin’s sharp and dynamic dialogue, coupled with familiar techniques like the ole’ walk n’ talk, makes the subject and the story far more engrossing than it should be, despite its historical significance.

The story is structured very much like a play with a no cuts aesthetic ala ‘Birdman’ which fits perfectly around the Sorkinesque dialogue, and it revolves around the lead up to 3 major product launches for Jobs; the 1984 Apple Macintosh launch billed as revolutionary, the 1988 doomed launch of NeXT computers after Jobs was removed from Apple by the board, and the triumphant return of the prodigal son to Apple for the 1998 launch of the iMac.

All the drama unfolds minutes before Jobs is scheduled to take the stage, which might be inaccurate but works to great dramatic effect. By not following Jobs’s real success which took place mainly in the 21st century, Boyle and Sorkin have chosen to focus on the early visionary days of success mixed with plenty of failure, which helped to form or magnify the man’s abrasive and driven character, and which makes ‘Steve Jobs’ a far more memorable experience than a typical full-life biopic.

The irresistible Michael Fassbender stars as the late Apple co-founder in a truly phenomenal central performance which captures the complicated personality of a man who was more of a tyrannical control freak than most CEOs, and who had a confrontational perfectionist personality which was the stuff of legend within the industry and went well beyond the boardroom into his family life.

‘Steve Jobs’ is neither a fanboy pleasing ode to Jobs nor is it a detractor’s attack on Apple Inc., Sorkin’s writing style and the tone of the film will be divisive, not to mention the characters, and technophobes may take issue with a narrative that’s unfortunately necessary for this story. But this is a bold and refreshing attempt to flesh out the psyche of a towering figure of the 21st century and even goes into his difficult childhood, which depending on your perspective, provides either a reason or an excuse for his personality and actions.

The film works well as an exploration of how we view “geniuses” and life-changing entrepreneurs, what we are prepared to overlook for what they give us, and what that says about our capitalist society. Ultimately ‘Steve Jobs’ casts a light, although a dim one, on what Jobs’s real genius was, not as a visionary inventor or designer, but as an expert on human psychology and a master manipulator, and no doubt one of the greatest marketers ever.

After all, this is the man who created a techno-cult that has burgeoned into a pseudo religion which convinced the world to consistently buy sexy but limited closed technology they don’t need, at extortionate prices, and worship him for it.

The Bottom Line…
‘Steve Jobs’ will be a divisive film thanks to an unorthodox narrative and frenetic dialogue, not to mention the unsympathetic nature of the titular character, but Aaron Sorkin and Danny Boyle’s bold storytelling coupled with Michael Fassbender’s remarkable performance results in a riveting triumph of biographical filmmaking, and a fascinating psychological exploration of the man who may well have defined the 21st century.
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7
AliceofXDec 1, 2015
I remember when back in 2013 the Jobs movie came out. Everything about the film's trailer was "do not see". Still to this day the moment when Kutcher says "we're making Apple cool again" makes me laugh. Right from the start this film lookedI remember when back in 2013 the Jobs movie came out. Everything about the film's trailer was "do not see". Still to this day the moment when Kutcher says "we're making Apple cool again" makes me laugh. Right from the start this film looked like they were going to do it right and I was anxiously waiting for it. And even though Steve Jobs wasn't everything I thought it would be it is still a quality drama.

Yet I can also see why it was not so commercially successful. It's weird format of taking place before three computer unveilings and the film essentially consisting of conversations with limited action between them. It is by no means a biography of the man's entire life but it does paint a portrait which, like any picture, only reveals some aspects of the person.

The film has a great cast who give solid performances. Michael Fassbender creates a character whose tyrannical and devilish behaviour you want to keep watching while longing for a glimpse of the human side.

Overall Steve Jobs is a very watchable and engaging film, provided you are already into end of the year Oscar bait drama films.
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5
oDjentoDec 4, 2015
Steve Jobs is a far superior attempt than Ashton Kutchers rendition of the man, but is still not that powerful a movie.
First of the pros. Michael Fassbender completely embodies Jobs, showing what an incredible actor he is and proving he can
Steve Jobs is a far superior attempt than Ashton Kutchers rendition of the man, but is still not that powerful a movie.
First of the pros. Michael Fassbender completely embodies Jobs, showing what an incredible actor he is and proving he can emulate anyone. Supporting cast is also incredibly good as well, with Seth Rogen giving a surprisingly good performance. One scene between Rogen and Fassbender – that of which takes place in an Orchestra pit – is an incredible piece of confrontation that encapsulated me.
However, the films set up is what bores. The film takes place in 3 different buildings during 3 of Jobs’ biggest commercial releases. The first one has you hooked on believing you are watching a great movie, with incredible dialogue and last moving scenes that really build up on what Jobs was like. However, after act one has ended the next 2 acts carry out in exactly the same fashion, with a mainly disappointing and boring effect. You feel like you’re watching the same scene over again.
Also, some of Danny Boyle’s directing choices were so odd and out of places, with at times bringing in CSI inspired miniature flashback/realisations that felt completely out of place with the rest of the film. Some of his choices really bewildered me.
Overall, the film starts of well but grinds itself down into tedium. Fassbender remains incredible throughout however, and supporting cast add greatly (although I must admit I found Winslet a little underwhelming, she more just always seemed to be there) to the film but you can’t help on the fact Danny Boyle picked a repetitive view point on Jobs’ life.
Excellent performances, odd choice of direction. Script is good, but also exceedingly repetitive.
5.0/10
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7
NordJitsuDec 21, 2015
The movie is generally entertaining and informative about Job's life, but the part of that life they choose to cover and what gets omitted prevent the movie from being excellent. While it's a well-done production, they simply did not produceThe movie is generally entertaining and informative about Job's life, but the part of that life they choose to cover and what gets omitted prevent the movie from being excellent. While it's a well-done production, they simply did not produce (or rather reproduce) the proper content to tell his story fully. Expand
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7
OlgaSia08Dec 27, 2015
Leaving my admiration for Aaron Sorkin’s writing behind, I really think “Steve Jobs” is a movie that is worth watching not only because of the really good acting of Michael Fassbender, Kate Winslet and Jeff Daniels, but also because of theLeaving my admiration for Aaron Sorkin’s writing behind, I really think “Steve Jobs” is a movie that is worth watching not only because of the really good acting of Michael Fassbender, Kate Winslet and Jeff Daniels, but also because of the fact that it gives insights into Steve Jobs’ life that we might’ve not known before and also because this might be the movie that could actually turn you into an Apple fan if you weren’t before. It successfully manages to show you the struggle of Steve Jobs to achieve the goal of making computers friendly and wanted by everyone in their homes, how Arthur C. Clarke said, and also shows you how passionate he was about his company and his work without compromising and always pushing himself and his employees further and further towards admirable results staying true to his vision and ambitions. Expand
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9
NickLikesMoviesDec 28, 2015
"Steve Jobs" pulses with magnetic energy and spark, is acted phenomenally, and has razor sharp writing and directing.
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1
SymmetryJan 1, 2016
I was terribly disappointed. Having read all positive reviews while not being a huge fan of Jobs (although I really liked the book) I went to see this movie expecting a decent script, powerful storyline and talented film production that canI was terribly disappointed. Having read all positive reviews while not being a huge fan of Jobs (although I really liked the book) I went to see this movie expecting a decent script, powerful storyline and talented film production that can turn not the strongest script into breathtaking movie. NONE of my expectations were met. Extremely boring script (which takes some talent to create given eventful Steve's life), average editorial work. I fell asleep in the middle and then woke up to feel sorry for Steve Jobs who was presented as sentimental ageing dad. I doubt he would agree with this interpretation despite all his indifference to what public thinks of him. Avoid. Expand
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3
chang1212Jan 22, 2016
I expected more from this movie. it has great actors but its definitely boring. I did not enjoy it. It was a slow movie with slow actors. he was just a stereotype of Steve Jobs.
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10
GentM2015Feb 25, 2016
Steve Jobs is directed by Danny Boyle and written by Aaron Sorkin.It stars Michael Fassbender as Jobs,other supporting cast include Kate Winslet,Seth Rogen,Katherine Waterston,Michael Stuhlbarg and Jeff Daniels
The movie explores Steve Jobs
Steve Jobs is directed by Danny Boyle and written by Aaron Sorkin.It stars Michael Fassbender as Jobs,other supporting cast include Kate Winslet,Seth Rogen,Katherine Waterston,Michael Stuhlbarg and Jeff Daniels
The movie explores Steve Jobs and it's divided in three parts on different time periods.Steve Jobs is completely about dialogue,so many people can be bored endlessly if they only want action in movies and excitement but thankfully I am one of those people who appreciate dialogue driven films.
It doesn't go through the entire life of Steve Jobs and obviously many important elements were left out on that aspect but it is not what the movie's about at all.We're here to see how he got to be the Steve Jobs that we all know,to see why he is who he is and with the help of the amazing dialogue written by Aaron Sorkin we get it.
Michael Fassbender gives one of the best performances of the entire year and so does Kate Winslet.Some of the scenes including the father-daughter story line are very emotional and build on the character and likability of Steve.Also,Fassbender nails every single scene he is in so having him on screen in between these emotional,dialogue scenes just makes everything perfect.
I really like the way the entire movie was played out to us,the dialogue is great and so is the acting.The director did a fantastic job here,but he did have one of the best screenwriters working today to help him out,which concluded to an amazingly rich and thrilling movie.
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8
PeterAlexanderJan 2, 2016
While Michael Fassbender provides easily the best portrayal of Steve Jobs on screen, Sorkin provides one of the best films of 2015. The film is gripping from start to finish, capturing the magic of the massive advancement in technologyWhile Michael Fassbender provides easily the best portrayal of Steve Jobs on screen, Sorkin provides one of the best films of 2015. The film is gripping from start to finish, capturing the magic of the massive advancement in technology between 1984 and 1998. With the perfect balance between Jobs' vision and his dramatic relationship with his friends and family, it is a story that was intensely emotional and grand in displaying the legacy of Steve Jobs. Expand
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8
TheApplegnomeJan 3, 2016
There are many characteristic mentions in this review, and that’s really what this film is about; Steve Jobs and his personality.

From the writers of ’The Social Network’ and the book ’Steve Jobs’ comes a realistic and truly dialog-driven
There are many characteristic mentions in this review, and that’s really what this film is about; Steve Jobs and his personality.

From the writers of ’The Social Network’ and the book ’Steve Jobs’ comes a realistic and truly dialog-driven biography-flick, that even made Steve Wozniak believe that Jobs was there in his younger self. The plot itself is centralized on three Apple-related events, and they all move very fast. The dialogs are so intense and packed with humor, emotions and realistic drama. Anger, embarrassment and basic human traits are all thrown over the place. ’Steve Jobs’ is high paced & dialog-driven film, that might be too fast for some and a bit too boring (dialogs) for others. But it’s without any doubt a spectacular film were characters are presented in an exemplary and realistic way. Yes, some of you might find it a bit too dialog-driven and even boring, and it really depends what kind of movies you like. The man of Apple is a very complex character, but they managed to present him in a splendid way. His personality; the way he see things and his behavior is so well visualized! The father-daughter relationship and the overall chemistry between different characters is exemplary, and most of the credit must go to the well chosen actors and the high-paced dialogs that never stops to irritate and even fascinate the main characters. There are many moments where things go badly, not just plot-related events; characters as well!

Michael Fassbender might not have the splendid look as what Ashton Kutcher managed to transform himself into in the less impressive ’Jobs-film’, but that’s the only downside. Fassbender didn't do just fine in this flick, we’re talking about a major transform into Steve Jobs himself. His performance might even be Oscar worthy, time will only tell. It might be his best performance to date, that’s for sure. A five star-worthy performance of a really complex character, well done! But it’s still not a flawless movie (none is); due to the very complexity of Steve Jobs, his development didn’t come of as very abstract. There could have been more change and conflict in him, but being a complex individual does make one understand why the writers didn't go further with him.

Yes; its another Apple-related film, but what is ’Steve Jobs’ really? It’s so much more than a tech-biography; it's a deep and understandable inside to what friendship, egoism, family, love, visions & obsessions can result into. Add a splendid direction by Danny Boyle with smooth camerawork, artistic moments, and of course the clever editing; that’s ’Steve Jobs’.

Personal Rating: 82/100
Critical rating: 95/100
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7
StevieGJDJan 22, 2016
I liked this more than I thought I would. Both Cumberbatch and Winslet are perfect and the movie is interesting in how it focusses on Job's career milestones (both good and bad) as the time signatures of his life. But it is by no meansI liked this more than I thought I would. Both Cumberbatch and Winslet are perfect and the movie is interesting in how it focusses on Job's career milestones (both good and bad) as the time signatures of his life. But it is by no means perfect. It doesn't really explain anything real about Steve Jobs and many of the supporting characters are pretty thin. I really like most of Sorkin's screenplays. This one is a little thin. But maybe that is part of the point. Expand
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6
Trev29Jan 24, 2016
There is the making of a great movie here, but the story just isn't that interesting. I'm bored of the story of Steve Jobs. Yes, the acting is good, but it doesn't leave much of an impression.
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8
MattBrady99Jan 24, 2016
So I've finally got a chance to watch "Steve Jobs" over the weekend and I thought it was pretty good. Michael Fassbender and Kate Winslet both gave a terrific performance, as the chemistry between the two was convincing and enjoyable toSo I've finally got a chance to watch "Steve Jobs" over the weekend and I thought it was pretty good. Michael Fassbender and Kate Winslet both gave a terrific performance, as the chemistry between the two was convincing and enjoyable to watch. The writing and the directing is this movies biggest strength, because the movie is non-stop talking and that's what this movie really is, and I know this isn't going to be for everyone, but for me, I was engaged all the way through and I honestly can't recall being bored while watching the movie. My biggest praise that I have for this movie has to go to Danny Boyle and Aaron Sorkin, because filming and writing a movie like this isn't easy (trust me).

The problems I have for the movie are very small and many people wouldn't be bothered by this, but this is just me. The little kid actor in the movie (Who plays Steve Jobs young daughter) she wasn't bad, as I thought she did alright for the most part, but there were a few times when I noticed some slip ups. But that's just a mini problem and the rest of the performances from everyone was great.

Overall Steve Jobs is a well made film with clever writing, outstanding acting and directing. It's a shame that this movie was pulled from many theaters because nobody wanted to see it. Jem and the Holograms and Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension, both sh*t movies that managed to stay in cinemas, but this movie didn't.
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8
EpicLadySpongeJan 29, 2016
This Steve Jobs movie is better than the movie named Jobs. Learn the history of Steve Jobs this way and the averagely good way while you enjoy the feature.
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8
jgzegerJan 30, 2016
Although I almost threw in the towel after half the movie as one can only take so much of Steve Jobs as ****
However, the second half more than redeemed the entire effort when it showed him with a touch of humanity and gave a reason for why
Although I almost threw in the towel after half the movie as one can only take so much of Steve Jobs as ****
However, the second half more than redeemed the entire effort when it showed him with a touch of humanity and gave a reason for why he was the way he was. Wonderfully directed, superbly acted, and beautifully filmed, it had me lingering on afterwards while watching the credits roll.
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9
Jess_HillFeb 5, 2016
When Danny Boyle and Aaron Sorkin combine, you're almost sure to have a winning combination, and this film is a masterful exploration of an uncompromising man. The razor sharp script isn't kind to the subject of the film, and Fassbender'sWhen Danny Boyle and Aaron Sorkin combine, you're almost sure to have a winning combination, and this film is a masterful exploration of an uncompromising man. The razor sharp script isn't kind to the subject of the film, and Fassbender's performance is brilliant, with Winslet providing a phenomenal support role. This is an intimate analysis of the man behind the (arguably) most innovative advances in personal computing the world has ever seen, but the storyline doesn't pull its punches, and it plays out in a compelling, fast paced manner that barely stops to breathe. An excellent film, well worth your time. 8.97/10 Expand
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8
LeZeeFeb 24, 2016
Pretty impressive narration, a better version out there for now.

US film or UK film is not an issue, but the real question was the second movie required? Plenty of films are made in a short period of gap about the same person like
Pretty impressive narration, a better version out there for now.

US film or UK film is not an issue, but the real question was the second movie required? Plenty of films are made in a short period of gap about the same person like 'Infamous' and 'Capote', themes like 'Olympus Has Fallen' and 'White House Down', and sometimes remakes like 'Deaths at a Funeral' from other film industries. So the history says audience accepts only they are different from each other and so this film was, but very very sad it bombed at the box office.

Like everybody I was not interested in this, even though it was from a renowned filmmaker. But after watching it now, I felt I was terribly wrong. Actually, this is the best version so far about the Apple Inc co-founder Steve Jobs. It was entirely a different narration than the previous one, everything was like the backstage drama that takes place before every product launch. That means most of the film was shot in the auditoriums and its corridor, parking lot, rooftop, and other surround places.

All the affairs like family, friends, co-founders, business, troubles et cetera are brought into one place and dealt there itself. Surely a very cleverly written screenplay and display by the actors, especially the two Oscars nominee Michael Fassbender and Kate Winslate. Once again Danny Boyle proved his directional skill with this beautiful biopic. I did not LIKE the end scene, but LOVED it. In fact, this film's end and Ashton Kutcher film's opening scenes has a clean follow. I also felt the movie was very honest, but I don't how much since I'm not into the books to learn about the famous personalities. It's not a must see, but definitely worth a try.

8/10
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1
David_HMar 7, 2016
One of the worst movies i've ever sat through. It was basically one scene after another after another of Jobs arguing or having conflict with every person in his life. I have no idea how accurate it was but i suspect its unlikely his lifeOne of the worst movies i've ever sat through. It was basically one scene after another after another of Jobs arguing or having conflict with every person in his life. I have no idea how accurate it was but i suspect its unlikely his life was that negative. there wasn't even any beautiful scenery or decent cinematography to balance out the depression, it was shot like a poor quality documentary. At any rate, the movie was a huge downer and the only thing it succeeds in is raising your blood pressure. Expand
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8
smiyamotMar 20, 2016
So interesting to see behind the scenes, what makes these well known people tick, what's really going on inside their heads. I thought Steve Jobs was an idea man, someone who had these fantastic ideas for products, then made them come true.So interesting to see behind the scenes, what makes these well known people tick, what's really going on inside their heads. I thought Steve Jobs was an idea man, someone who had these fantastic ideas for products, then made them come true. By this movie, he was a control freak not only in business but in his private life as well. Kinda explains why he died. Expand
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8
MovieMasterEddyApr 3, 2016
How do you get to the bottom of a character like Steve Jobs, a figure so towering and complex that he could arguably serve as the basis of a film as ambitious as Citizen Kane? If you’re a dramatist with the character insight and verbalHow do you get to the bottom of a character like Steve Jobs, a figure so towering and complex that he could arguably serve as the basis of a film as ambitious as Citizen Kane? If you’re a dramatist with the character insight and verbal dexterity of Aaron Sorkin, you make him the vortex of a swirling human hurricane, the puppet master who kept all around him on strings, the impresario of a circus dedicated to the creation and dramatic unveiling of technological wonders that changed the world. Racing in high gear from start to finish, Danny Boyle’s electric direction temperamentally complements Sorkin’s highly theatrical three-act study, which might one day be fascinating to experience in a staged setting. With its high-profile launches at the Telluride, New York and London film festivals, this Universal release is clearly positioned as one of the prestige titles of the fall season, and will be high priority viewing for discerning audiences around the world.

Conceptually, Sorkin’s work is structured like a play, as the three roughly forty-minute sections are set backstage as Jobs, who has been invested with equal parts hubris and focus by Michael Fassbender, prepares to launch three of his major products: The Macintosh in 1984, the NeXT “Cube” in 1988 and the iMac in 1998. The same subsidiary characters swirl in and out: Jobs’ feisty and invaluable marketing executive Joanna Hoffman (Kate Winslet), tech genius and early partner Steve Wozniak (Seth Rogen), Mac software designer Andy Herzfeld (Michael Stuhlbarg), Apple chief executive John Sculley (Jeff Daniels), perennially shunned ex-girlfriend Chrisann Brennan (Katherine Waterston) and the latter’s daughter with Jobs, Lisa (Makenzie Moss, then Perla Haney-Jardine). The actors are uniformly superb.

The dramatic, dynamic linking all these characters is that everyone wants something from the young Zeus of their world that they cannot get. The specifics differ in each case, but they all boil down to the desire for acknowledgment of their value from a difficult and withholding man, one famous for abusing his underlings, keeping them guessing about where they stand and rejecting their ideas only to later claim them as his own. As with Kirk Douglas’ ambitious movie producer in The Bad and the Beautiful in another era, the boss treats even those closest to him very badly but, in the end, his intimates and associates so desperately crave his approval that they keep coming back for more.

Following a disarming black-and-white clip of Arthur C. Clarke in 1974, accurately extolling a future in which computers will “enrich our society” and be as commonplace as telephones, Boyle and Sorkin jump ahead just ten years and plunge right into the mad moments before Jobs is to take the stage in Cupertino to introduce the Mac to a panting public, which has already had its appetite whetted by Ridley Scott’s brilliant 1984 Super Bowl commercial.

Jobs (who was just 29 at the time) was never anything other than cool and composed before the public, but conditions backstage could not be more chaotic: Jobs insists to his frazzled tech wizard Hertzfeld that the Mac itself must say “hello” to the crowd and demands that the exit signs be (illegally) turned off, Woz badgers him to publicly acknowledge the old Apple II team and Chrisann picks this moment to show up with little Lisa and give him hell for not acknowledging his daughter and providing for them.

As he has repeatedly shown in the past, Sorkin has a gift for writing the elevated gab of brainiacs, which has made him an ideal chronicler of such modern-age titans as Mark Zuckerberg and now Jobs. That said, The Social Network and Steve Jobs are radically different in their approaches to drama and character. But whereas David Fincher’s direction of the former provided an incisive, and often quite funny, sense of cool to the former, Boyle’s fast-heartbeat pacing and quasi-verite style provides the new film with a constant dramatic hum and you-are-there immediacy.

Propulsively fast, fleet and inquisitive, the film is at the same time somewhat less flashy than most of Boyle’s most famous and successful works, including Trainspotting, Slumdog Millionaire and 127 Hours. Due to its “backstage” setting and approximate real-time frame, Jobs can’t help but provoke memories of the recent Birdman, which breathtakingly covered continuous action with unprecedented fluidity. Boyle’s sophisticated but pragmatic visual approach to evoking a maelstrom of activity stands somewhere between that and more conventional cinema-verite, befitting, perhaps, the period in which it’s set.

The Jobs legend keeps on growing.
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9
knowmoviesnoseApr 9, 2016
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. This is a theory & why I'm giving the score 9. The first time I watched it, I was kind of disappointed. I enjoyed Michael Fassbender, Kate Winslet, Seth Rogan & Michael Stuhlbarg's performances immensely; it was the choppiness that bothered me - I wanted more, and I wanted to understand more, and I did a lot of research, and then I watched the movie again. The research helped, BUT... but, but, but I caught something that I don't want to read in a review before I just set it out there. I could be so wrong, but I want to be wrong on my own merit. The second time around I caught this linear story about computers kind of playing with the mind all along, and that, in fact, IF intentional, is genius. I can't write all of the things, but my examples are the constant interruptions - to me - were like opening several windows. We, the audience, were able to keep up as one window was closed, put on hold, and we engaged in a conversation, then closed that window, and went to another. Also, the two Andy characters, clearly depict a technical problem throughout, where Steve finally just says, "no, I know who they are, I need everyone around me to change the way they say their names." I find that a reference to the user in a program needing to kind of go find and replace or something much deeper that I might not understand about computing; a last example I will give is when Andy Hertzfeld leaves his office after discussing money for college, and Steve is discussing the speed of processors, and we see these flickers of his daughter; yes, they are obviously memories, but also the speed or time lapsation (I created that word just now), begins to change as he begins to talk about bigger processors - or processors that work faster and hold more memory (and his memory is briefly holding longer in his mind as well, which, to me, helps us process it better). If I am right about the references, it makes me want to watch it more and try to catch all of them. However, if I am wrong, then my scoring of this movie would dramatically decrease. I guess sooner or later I will find out if there is anything to my theory at all, or if I'm creating my own imaginary "thing" to keep myself interested in an otherwise well-acted but kind of "hey, Steve Jobs was a narcissistic guy who bides his time to get back on top of apple, and he hurt a lot of people AND other jerks waited until he died to write this, and that kind of leaves a bad taste in my mouth about them more than him." Go figure. Expand
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8
AndrewLambertApr 13, 2016
Danny Boyle and Aaron Sorkin create an original and complex tribute to a truly fascinating character in Steve Jobs, defined by a masterful performance from Michael Fassbender at his very best.
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1
tv12May 10, 2016
A painful movie to watch. The false plot device of having all these major emotional scenes take place before major product launch was trite and overwrought. Movie just never came together. Read the book but avoid this movie, a total bust.
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8
TheArchetypesSep 9, 2016
Steve Jobs is an interesting film about an interesting person. Michael Fassbender was brilliant as the title character and really succeeded in portraying Jobs as unlikeable but weirdly appealing and charismatic at the same time. Seth Rogen,Steve Jobs is an interesting film about an interesting person. Michael Fassbender was brilliant as the title character and really succeeded in portraying Jobs as unlikeable but weirdly appealing and charismatic at the same time. Seth Rogen, Kate Winslet, Jeff Danials and Michael Stuhlbarg were all great as well. They all deserve Oscar nominations! Looking at what went on backstage at the launch of various important Apple products, the movie focuses on Steve Jobs' relationships with his co-workers and with his daughter. The movie is never boring despite being set almost entirely in different rooms and corridors. The dialogue is rapid and really compelling. In short, Steve Jobs is an intriguing look at one of the great pioneers of technology. Expand
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7
SpangleSep 19, 2016
Steve Jobs is a film that has some flaws, but above all, it defiantly strikes home just how brilliant Aaron Sorkin is a writer. Steve Jobs be damned. Actors be damned. The film is all about Sorkin, which is both a gift and a curse. With everySteve Jobs is a film that has some flaws, but above all, it defiantly strikes home just how brilliant Aaron Sorkin is a writer. Steve Jobs be damned. Actors be damned. The film is all about Sorkin, which is both a gift and a curse. With every Sorkinism in the book (the film is 94% walking and talking), Steve Jobs is a magnifying, dense, and structural behemoth with writing that steals the showcase and refuses to let anyone else steal the spotlight. No matter how brilliant Michael Fassbender is as Jobs or Kate Winslet as Joanna Hoffman, the writing is the star of this play.

The tragic flaw in this is that it loses sight of its main character. Though the film is about Steve Jobs, it feels oddly formatted. I am fine with them skipping over the reveals and just focusing on the background conversations before the reveals. However, it should have focused more on the aftermath. The failures, the personal turmoil, and Steve Jobs' firing more. It touched on it, but never with any depth. Instead, it demands Steve Jobs to show emotion and show his hand, but he is incapable of doing this. Thus, much of the film falls on deaf ears. It is cool to look at, well shot, well acted, and the dialogue is impeccable. But, it lacks any weight. This is why the best was saved for last with Steve's conversation with his daughter Lisa (Perla Haney-Jardine). With the weight that the rest of the film demanded, the dialogue in the sequence and the emotional power of it all made me want to jump up and celebrate. When Jobs finally opens up and shows his human side to his daughter, the film is a resounding success. The end shot that fades slowly as Jobs walks the stage and looks back lovingly at Lisa is absolutely impeccable. In one scene, Danny Boyle encapsulated everything that makes cinema wonderful. The cinematic strength and power of that final scene is unlike that I have seen in a long, long time. Immaculate is the perfect word for it. Unfortunately, the rest of the film just lacks any of that power. Not even a hint of that heart.

The film is unwilling to vilify Jobs as well for his inadequacies as a father and a person. Bracing the audience for every punch by reminding us just how brilliant he was and what a visionary he was, every time we are shown that he is an **** we still come away thinking, "Yeah, but he's innovative". As if that is some accomplishment. That said, it does a good job capturing the two sides of Jobs. While they do not gel together, Sorkin captures Jobs at his most assholish states as well as at his most brilliant. It is hard to place your finger on the man, maybe because he was a diverse human being with two sides. Thus, my complaint may be silly, but all the same, it felt tonally off as a result of not following through with either the vilification or the celebration. Though there was some attempt at the latter in the aforementioned conversation with Lisa, it hardly makes up for the rest of the film when he treats everyone in his life like garbage.

On the positive side, there are a lot of strengths to this film. Fassbender and Winslet are brilliant. Jeff Daniels' turn as Apple CEO John Scully is as impressive as always. Seth Rogen is shockingly good as Steve Wozniak. Michael Stuhlbag, an always terrific character actor, is phenomenal as Andy Hertzfeld. It is a shame he did not get more recognition. Danny Boyle's direction is assured as always. Though, it feels very different than many of his other films. Trainspotting, 28 Days Later, Slumdog Millionaire, and 127 Hours, all had a similar Eisensteinian kind of feeling to them. Packed with conflict in the editing with scenes, quick cuts, and I do not really know how to describe it...an authentic feeling maybe? They feel raw, unfiltered, and natural. Steve Jobs is far more Hollywoodized with camera work more along the lines of the typical Aaron Sorkin film. Tracking shots like ones straight out of Goodfellas are the norm here and in his films as the camera struggles to keep up with the characters. Steve Jobs is a mirror image of all of his past works in this regard.

The writing is very dense and detailed, but so is the direction. The writing is obviously dense with obscure references and big words to match the brilliance of Jobs. The direction, however, is equally as detailed. One example that I feel brings this to light the best is when Jobs is arguing with Wozniak before the launch of the iMac. As Wozniak storms off after Jobs refused to acknowledge the Apple2 team yet again, the screen behind Jobs changes to the Apple logo and tagline, "Think Different". A small detail in a film with many subtleties, but appreciated nonetheless.

Steve Jobs is a tough film to truly assess. With incredible writing and direction, is undeniably brilliant artistically. The film itself is wildly entertaining. Watching this brilliance, Sorkin's language, and Sorkin's conversations is never boring. Yet, as a biopic, it feels like it never let's you in. It feels too distant.
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6
LongshotsOct 22, 2016
A ton of build up and drama x3.

its like watching the preparal for a heist then not seeing the heist. 3 times.

.....................................
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9
SomePersonaJan 18, 2017
This movie's awesome! It incorporates all of the elements of Steve Job's life at different periods of time in clever visual (first part in 16mm, second part in 35mm, third part digital) and audible (analog-sounding score in first part, operaThis movie's awesome! It incorporates all of the elements of Steve Job's life at different periods of time in clever visual (first part in 16mm, second part in 35mm, third part digital) and audible (analog-sounding score in first part, opera in second part, digital-sounding score in third part) ways. Expand
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7
voxottoJun 18, 2017
shot greatly, saw things i didn't think i'd want to know but i do know not. but i would have love to see the creation of the ipod aswell and the latter part of his life. The movie also Heavily demands your focus, you can't take a pee breakshot greatly, saw things i didn't think i'd want to know but i do know not. but i would have love to see the creation of the ipod aswell and the latter part of his life. The movie also Heavily demands your focus, you can't take a pee break because there is so much dialogue that you will miss alot of important talking. + after seeing ashton kutcher as steve jobs( not the best actor) i can not unsee it, while watching him you really thought that was steve jobs because of the looks, here.. i had to keep reminding myself that its steve Expand
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9
JunelKeanJun 29, 2017
Set behind the scenes at three product launches, the Macintosh, NeXT and iMac, this film explores the world of digital revolution to look on the progress of technology and the private life of the CEO of Apple, Steve Jobs. But the emphasis ofSet behind the scenes at three product launches, the Macintosh, NeXT and iMac, this film explores the world of digital revolution to look on the progress of technology and the private life of the CEO of Apple, Steve Jobs. But the emphasis of this movie are the rip-roaring moments and intensifying events backstage before the launches of his three mentioned iconic products.

This film has three acts which represents the three time periods of Jobs' career entirely shown by adrenaline-fueled dialogue. It turns 120 minutes of talking into an interesting movie written fantastically by Aaron Sorkin. It is also extremely well-acted by its actors: Steve Jobs is played by Michael Fassbender, who gives the performance of his career. It also stars Kate Winslet, Jeff Daniels, Katherine Waterston and Seth Rogen, who all nailed it, in terms of performances.

It is an energetic movie with a strong direction from Danny Boyle. But Steve Jobs is not a movie for everyone. Some would be bored and not interested, but if you like dialogue-driven films, Steve Jobs would be an investing movie for you.

VERDICT: Sorkin, Boyle and Fassbender work magic together.
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6
fearti2Nov 21, 2017
First, I have to mention about accomplished acting of Michael Fassbender and Seth Rogen who is usually known for his roles in comedy movies. I can say that the movie couldn't live up to my expectations. It would be more appropriate if theFirst, I have to mention about accomplished acting of Michael Fassbender and Seth Rogen who is usually known for his roles in comedy movies. I can say that the movie couldn't live up to my expectations. It would be more appropriate if the name of the movie was "Steve Jobs: Macintosh and Lisa" for the sake of meeting the viewers' expectations. Because, his marriage, relationship with Pixar, his illness and many important subjects were not mentioned in the movie. Expand
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