Paramount Pictures | Release Date: July 14, 1995 CRITIC SCORE DISTRIBUTION
58
METASCORE
Mixed or average reviews based on 25 Critics
Positive:
14
Mixed:
11
Negative:
0
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88
It is the kind of film that enables adults to get in touch with their inner child - but more important, gets children in touch with their inner adult. [14 July 1995, p.03]
75
The Seattle TimesDoug Thomas
Oz creates a highly positive urban family unit - not the slightly dysfunctional one we usually see in movies these days. [14 July 1995, p.D25]
75
Melissa Mathison, who wrote E.T., the Extra-Terrestrial and co-authored The Black Stallion script, isn't one to louse up a modern classic with overkill. [14 July 1995, p.1D]
75
Chicago TribuneGary Dretzka
These lessons in multiculturism and tolerance should fall easily on young viewers only expecting to be entertained. [14 July 1995, p.D]
75
The Indian in the Cupboard unfolds with absorbing logic to tell a tale in the best of children's story tradition. [17 July 1995]
70
An engaging and touching flight of fancy. [17 July 1995, p.60]
63
A humane alternative that makes the phrase family values mean something. [14 July 1995, p.33]
63
St. Louis Post-DispatchStaff (Not Credited)
This is not a great movie - sometimes, soaring orchestral music tries to evoke emotions that don't quite rise out of the drama itself - but it is a good, kind-spirited one that should please both parents and children. [14 July 1995, p.3E]
50
Unlike Omri's plastic toys, The Indian in the Cupboard never comes to life. [14 July 1995, p.5G]
50
With its long silences washed over by banal, overused music, The Indian in the Cupboard is best watched for its ingenious tricks of scale and for an invitingly peaceful look. [14 July 1995, p.C3]
50
Oz is a bit too impressed by the story's enchantment - too inclined to dwell on Omri's astonished gaze and too eager to fill the soundtrack with Randy Edelman's ain't-it-awesome? musical score. [14 July 1995, p.17]
42
What is most surprising about The Indian in the Cupboard is its listless pacing, without emotional goosebumps. Director Frank Oz's films (Little Shop of Horrors, Housesitter), usually possess an energy to carry audiences along. [14 July 1995, p.8]