Warner Bros. | Release Date: October 18, 1941
8.2
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Universal acclaim based on 46 Ratings
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8
amheretojudgeJun 17, 2019
Bogart is bluffing with such authenticity, he is deep and cannot be disenchanted; enters a lady with a tricky case.

The Maltese Falcon Huston is, as a storyteller, simply narrating. A lot of directors have come and gone, but none of them
Bogart is bluffing with such authenticity, he is deep and cannot be disenchanted; enters a lady with a tricky case.

The Maltese Falcon

Huston is, as a storyteller, simply narrating. A lot of directors have come and gone, but none of them was just reading it to you, tucking you in, he whispers the book in his infamous adaptation like it is his, the director's, John Huston. The story, if you are aware of it, has been wielded before too, but it didn't come out this durable and.. well, shiny. The narration is a bit tricky in here, since it is something that would- I wanna say be better if on paper, because it is and it was good- resist if exaggerated.

The scenarios, the characters, the entire tone of this film-noir is bound within four walls. It ping-pongs here are there with "He said. She said" affair where as an audience you are in a rush to figure out what actually is going on or has been going on in this first act. After which the film reveals all its cards and we relaxed back in our seats, hoping for something "Bang!" to go wrong. But it doesn't. This is where the film cheated me the most and left me in awe of it.

For if I think about it I never wanted it to go wrong or right or in fact anywhere. Huston's filmmaking is so present in that room where around three to four major characters are sitting around or roaming about that you don't want this day to end. Anticipation is the game then, and the tease, is Huston's key to success. Watch how a simple phone call or a knock on the door pumps up your heartbeat fast, scared, hoping that it wouldn't collapse, "The stuff that dreams are made of." The Maltese Falcon is as good as any historic event, I say claim it history and be done with it.
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7
misterBBCApr 6, 2018
The Stuff is dreams are made of...
Movie that's defines film-noir. All of it's there: cynical detective, femme fatale, light/dark contrast. And also one of the most regonizeble MacGuffin in movie history. Humphrey Bogart is amazing, the man
The Stuff is dreams are made of...
Movie that's defines film-noir. All of it's there: cynical detective, femme fatale, light/dark contrast. And also one of the most regonizeble MacGuffin in movie history. Humphrey Bogart is amazing, the man that oozing with his charisma through the screen. Bogart and Huston just simply created a character that is all noir.
I have to be honest, i didn't like it at first time, but giving it a thought it was really something... With my "not liking it at the first time" conflicting with my love for cinema i'm giving this picture only 7, even though deeply inside i know it deserves more...
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10
ChrisMizerakJan 25, 2020
"The Maltese Falcon" stars Humphrey Bogart in one of his most cherished roles as Sam Spade. Sam is a streetwise detective who can outwit anyone aiming to give him trouble or use the contradicting words and stories someone utters against them"The Maltese Falcon" stars Humphrey Bogart in one of his most cherished roles as Sam Spade. Sam is a streetwise detective who can outwit anyone aiming to give him trouble or use the contradicting words and stories someone utters against them in spectacular fashion. There's a pat reason a character like Sam Spade and a film such as "The Maltese Falcon" have persevered in film culture for many years.

It took me a couple viewings until now to finally comprehend the countless high praise this film has continued to receive. The best way I can describe why this experience grew on me is more or less the common ingredients it shares with "The Thin Man". It's more about the fascinating interactions that various characters have with one another than it is about the mystery at the narrative's center. To be clear, the mystery in both films are still exceptional, both based on works by Dashiell Hammett.

This is just my way of reemphasizing the film's true focus at hand, so to speak. For example, I love the interactions Sam shares with his secretary Effie, played by Lee Patrick. Whenever they're working on a case, they make a swell team in their respective roles, thanks to their ability to think one step ahead and the sizzling chemistry and terrific one-liners they bounce off one another.

The cast is given stellar material to work with and take advantage of their time in the spotlight. Sydney Greenstreet is clearly enjoying himself as the antagonistic Kasper Gutman, whose relentless search for a falcon statuette made of jewels has brought him to San Francisco in an elaborate scheme that will make your head spin. Peter Lorre brings a suave yet intense commitment to his role as Joel Cairo, an accomplice in Gutman's search for the falcon.

Let's not forget about Mary Astor as Brigid O'Shaughnessy, a femme fatale who continues getting caught up in her own lies that even Sam Spade is uncertain over how to handle her. It's not easy to play a character who is always a mystery to figure out, but Mary Astor's work as Brigid is probably as good as it gets. As the film responsible for launching the film noir genre, it's not difficult to dissect why "The Maltese Falcon" is truly the stuff that dreams are made of.
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