The Cinema Guild | Release Date: January 30, 2019
7.3
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Generally favorable reviews based on 15 Ratings
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amheretojudgeJan 30, 2019
The Old Boy And The Young Man.

Ahlat Agaci Bilge Ceylan's making of a book is as meticulous as it can get, throbbing arguments that never crosses the line to be a preaching-to-the-choir tone, this drama is more horror than it claims to be.
The Old Boy And The Young Man.

Ahlat Agaci

Bilge Ceylan's making of a book is as meticulous as it can get, throbbing arguments that never crosses the line to be a preaching-to-the-choir tone, this drama is more horror than it claims to be. And similar to the summary of the plot- a son returns hometown after graduation and gets sucked into the sleazy schemes of his gambling father- the first act of the film can arguably considered as a bluff. And the journey of surprising us in each steps after the first act, that it promises to deliver us consistently, has its own cathartic release. But mind you, this game is played subconsciously with us, while the real drama on the screen comes like Rosefeldt's Manifesto- of course without sounding like a pretentious robotic monologue.

I would consider this as writers major win among all the others. The writers always had in mind to go deep into hardcore debates of world politics, life changing inspirations and seduce-like negative emotions that grows like cancer as one ages. And their procedure is pure bravura of work, initiating from one of my favorite meetings of our protagonist with his somewhat-like-an-old-lover, the film deals with the social issues that is justified and well crafted out in narration since there was a ticking clock behind them.

Cut to another nail-biting argument with an established writer, breaking the wall of celebrity and fan equation, the heating conversation is used as the primary weapon to start initiating on fabricating the other side of our lead character; this is the turning point of the film. Followed by another major discussion of probably everything, among his friends, the writers calls it a day on the preaching note as the viewers are left both cheated and challenged at the brisk of their seat.

While our so called hero struggles with the rest of the world like such, along with the nagging of his father's debt collectors, there is an entirely different game played in his house. But frankly, I would pity the actor to even show up on screen to share it with Cemcir, not only for his brilliant performance but the power that the character he plays has on the film. That three dimensional persona never fails to amaze us, from his half crooked smile to his ideologies, his character is peeled off layer by layer.

And clearly the makers were most euphoric about him, the way other characters speak about his great deeds and how he is so devoted to his work (in the final act, when his son comes to visit him, he still is keeping an eye on his students) despite of being flawed, just makes him more and more rich. There is a lot to listen and lot to ponder about, but as it was intended, the equation of a father and a son will melt you down in the end and to pull off that scene after implementing the fact that Demirkol leaves him without any help lying on the ground, has got to be the biggest development of the film. The Wild Pear Tree is every bit of wild as it has right to be.
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LajaleaaMay 19, 2019
"If you love what you do, you can survive anywhere."
.
( #20/100 ) . Después de ver la nueva película de Nuri Bilge Ceylan, "Ahlat Agaci" (Official Selection Cannes 2018), me decepcioné y molesté con lo que la gente hace con el cine a veces.
"If you love what you do, you can survive anywhere."
.
( #20/100 )
.
Después de ver la nueva película de Nuri Bilge Ceylan, "Ahlat Agaci" (Official Selection Cannes 2018), me decepcioné y molesté con lo que la gente hace con el cine a veces. El mérito que la gente le da a la película se encuentra en el dialogo, el cual conforma todo el proyecto. Pero mientras unos ven una extensa e importante conversación que revela la angustia existencial hacia los valores y acciones tomadas por los varios "roles" que conforman a la misma cultura que afecta y forma al individuo, yo veo una fallida intención de explicar la serie de posturas indefinidas que conforman a la cultura ignorante y vacía con la que luchará la voluntad de un sujeto igualmente confundido y que, al final, el mayor atributo de su viaje es que "aprendió" que "solo sabe que no sabe nada".
Hay certeza en la existencia y se basa en la información, pero si lo sustituimos por una sutil y pesada intención de convicción, entonces no habrá resolución. "The Wild Pear Tree" ignora eso y se convierte en una conversación sin argumentos, conceptos definidos, acuerdos o conclusiones, que le da permiso a sus personajes de defender una postura poco informada y muy sesgada que simplemente se deja a la deriva de la atención de la gente con poco habito de reflexión. Visualmente no existe una menor intención de poética y congruencia entre tomas. Hay drásticos cambios de calidad de imagen que se pueden ver entre cortes, una falta de cuidado en la corrección de color o, mínimo, mostrar el panorama de la historia de forma sensible. Las actuaciones simplemente se encargan de conversar con elocuencia el dialogo que representan. La intensidad dramática solo se presenta en 3 min. de las 3 horas que la película hace soportar a su público.
El cine no solo puede ser más que un vórtice de incertidumbre mal producido, sino que también tiene que promover el valor de la voz y el propósito; no de voces ignorantes e intenciones incompletas cuya resolución sea la rendición.
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After seeing the new #movie of Nuri Bilge Ceylan, “Ahlat Agaci” (Official Selection in Cannes 2018) I got disappointed and mad with what people makes with cinema sometimes. The achievement that people gives to the film it’s found in the dialog, which builds up all the project. But when some see an extensive and important conversation that reveals the existential anguish towards the values and actions taken by the several “roles” that conform the same culture that affects and forms the individual, I see a failed intention of explaining the different undefined postures that conforms the ignorant and empty culture with which the will of one subject, equally confused, will fight so, at the end, the major attribute of his journey is that he “learned” that “he only knows he doesn’t know anything”.
There is certainty in the existence, and it’s based in information, but if we substitute it with a subtle and heavy intention of conviction, then there will be no resolution. “The Wild Pear Tree” ignores that and becomes a conversation with no arguments, defined concepts, agreements or conclusions, that permits its characters to defend a poorly informed and very biased posture that ends up adrift to the attention of people with little reflective habits. Visually there’s not a minor intention of poetic or congruence among the takes. There are drastic changes of quality in the image between cuts, a lack of care in the color correction or, at least, in showing the landscape in a sensible form. The acting simply is responsible of making an eloquent conversation with the scrip that they represent. The dramatic intensity it’s only shown in 3 min. out of 3 hours in which the movie makes it’s public to sit through.
Cinema can’t just be more than a vortex of uncertainty badly produced, but it can also promote the value of voice and porpoise; not of ignorant voices and incomplete intentions which resolution is rendition.
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m15964Apr 9, 2019
This is kind of cinema that in Middle East has so much fans, Because lots of lives there are much like what shown in this masterpiece movie from the GREAT Ceylan. Absolutely MUST WATCH for everyone that wants to know a little about how toThis is kind of cinema that in Middle East has so much fans, Because lots of lives there are much like what shown in this masterpiece movie from the GREAT Ceylan. Absolutely MUST WATCH for everyone that wants to know a little about how to live in Middle East countries. Expand
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