Metascore
65

Generally favorable reviews - based on 6 Critic Reviews

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 6
  2. Negative: 0 out of 6
Buy On
  1. May 29, 2020
    80
    Domesticated is a blissful trip, managing the enviable feat of being inventive and comforting at the same time, and is highly recommended for all electronic music fans.
  2. Jul 1, 2020
    70
    Domesticated is a low-key album by Tellier's standards, but it captures the feeling that settling down is something to be savored, and it's got to be the most glamorous-sounding album about home sweet home.
  3. Mojo
    May 28, 2020
    60
    It starts in fine fashion. ... Tellier's Auto-Tuned croon is unrelenting, and by the album's mid-point we're approaching the realms of self-parody. [May 2020, p.89]
  4. Uncut
    May 28, 2020
    60
    The Gallic tendency to prettify everything into anodyne melodic gloop occasionally jars. [Jun 2020, p.38]
  5. May 28, 2020
    60
    Domesticated is a concept album whose concept falls flat; a shot at the future that’s too in debt to the past; a brilliant idea consumed by inertia—less back-breaking deep clean than half-hearted tidy.
  6. May 28, 2020
    50
    It’s all pleasant, but feels inessential and - at times - dated, not least because the lower-tempo tracks veer dangerously close to sounding like chillwave. Domestication has not robbed Sébastien of his adventurousness, but the killer instinct that defines his best work is missing here: ‘Domesticated’ is a meandering listen.
User Score
tbd

No user score yet- Awaiting 2 more ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 2
  2. Negative: 0 out of 2
  1. Jun 4, 2020
    6
    We want to love and be loved by french music. We want to hear sounds that make us dance and even be sad sometimes. Remember cool moments fromWe want to love and be loved by french music. We want to hear sounds that make us dance and even be sad sometimes. Remember cool moments from the past and dream about the future. Sebastian in this album does not give us the right to fall in love. He left all the beauty of music for himself. Full Review »