User Score
8.9

Universal acclaim- based on 34 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 32 out of 34
  2. Negative: 1 out of 34
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  1. May 15, 2020
    10
    A completely phenomenal piece of art that demands multiple listens, and close reading of its lyrics to fully understand.
  2. May 15, 2020
    10
    An absolute serve. A flawless album from the beginning to the end. Truly a masterpiece. Best tracks: Cut Me, In Bloom, Colouour, Polly, Me In 20 Years, Lucky Me, Bystanders. Honestly the whole album is so amazing, and so are the interludes. A true work of art.
  3. May 16, 2020
    10
    "I gave my life
    To something
    Something bigger
    Than me..."
    ...plus luxury sound.
  4. May 17, 2020
    10
    One of the best albums to come out in 2020 so far. Every song takes you on a journey. A significant step up from Aromanticism, which was also a great album.
Metascore
90

Universal acclaim - based on 14 Critic Reviews

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 14 out of 14
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 14
  3. Negative: 0 out of 14
  1. May 19, 2020
    90
    Shifting from pounding rock to experimental jazz at a feather’s touch, the album’s sonics provide the theatrical soundscape to Sumney’s words, rising and falling in line with his crystalline tones.
  2. May 19, 2020
    90
    Moses Sumney and Mike Hadreas have made the albums of our strange quarantine season — bleak but tender, sprawling yet intricately detailed, as suffused with the need for physical contact as they are alert to its dangers and prohibitions. ... Stunning art-soul record. ... Yet as busy as the music can occasionally feel, both albums keep close track of the singers’ voices, which always merit the attention.
  3. May 18, 2020
    80
    It’s hard to imagine many of its songs being performed onstage, even before the pandemic — even as it encompasses more sonic possibilities, from the orchestral to the surreal. ... Sumney doesn’t have to explain himself in prose. His songs do it even better.