How to Solve Our Human Problems, Pt. 1 [EP] Image
Metascore
76

Generally favorable reviews - based on 9 Critic Reviews What's this?

User Score
8.3

Universal acclaim- based on 6 Ratings

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  • Summary: The first of a planned trilogy of EPs for the Scottish indie band was produced by Leo Abrahams.
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 6 out of 9
  2. Negative: 0 out of 9
  1. Dec 8, 2017
    94
    If they’ve been treading water for the last ten years, then How to Solve Our Human Problems, Pt. 1 is the sound of them emerging--refreshed, invigorated, and ready to return to the hearts and ears of fans across the world.
  2. Dec 6, 2017
    80
    The first five songs could be mistaken for unreleased tracks from an earlier era, but they are a bit more knowing.
  3. Dec 8, 2017
    80
    The music draws on two decades of musicianship to showcase the indie veterans’ trademark versatility. Anthemic “We Were Beautiful” melds euphoric horns with programmed drum machines; elsewhere, “The Girl Doesn’t Get It” floats its lyrics across a sea of synths. Best of all is delicate opener “Sweet Dew Lee,” on which Stuart Murdoch’s honeyed delivery posits him as the missing link between Simon and Garfunkel.
  4. Dec 8, 2017
    75
    What stands out about the first entry in Belle & Sebastian’s three-part EP series How To Solve Our Human Problems is how much it, like 2015’s Girls In Peacetime Want To Dance, sounds like the work of an out-and-out band.
  5. Dec 8, 2017
    69
    How to Solve Our Human Problems, Part 1 is the sound of a band deploying its full arsenal of bells and whistles to seize your attention, even when the songs themselves aren’t always strong enough to retain the grip.
  6. Dec 6, 2017
    60
    The true standout of the EP is Fickle Season. ... The other three tracks are inoffensive but somewhat forgettable
  7. 60
    The EP opens with the lovely “Sweet Dew Lee”, a genial pop strummer in the manner of early Orange Juice, its buoyant melody evoking a hill climb to an urban vista as the protagonist daydreams of a parallel world in which he and his departed lover are still an item.

See all 9 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 1
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 1
  3. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. Jan 12, 2018
    8
    For sad bastard music, it's not bad.

    Honestly, I'm presently surprised. Any time B&S comes out with a new album, I always try to listen to
    For sad bastard music, it's not bad.

    Honestly, I'm presently surprised. Any time B&S comes out with a new album, I always try to listen to it, just so I can text my buddy and tell him "I'm listening to an album. It's the new Belle & Sebastian".

    We watched High Fidelity way too many times.
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