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Prophets of Rage Image
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Mixed or average reviews - based on 19 Critics What's this?

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5.0

Mixed or average reviews- based on 24 Ratings

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  • Summary: The debut full-length release for the collaboration between Tom Morello, Tim Commerford and Brad Wilk of Rage Against The Machine, Chuck D and DJ Lord of Public Enemy and B-Real of Cypress Hill was produced by Brendan O'Brien.
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 19
  2. Negative: 1 out of 19
  1. 80
    This is not a subtle record, but these are not subtle times. So grab a Marshall stack, put it through a fascist’s window and let’s start the revolution. Now.
  2. 75
    These tracks aren't revolutionary classics on the same level as “Killing in the Name” or “Fight the Power” just yet, but nevertheless, they raise a fist to all those who continue to fight ignorance, hypocrisy, brutality and the elite.
  3. Sep 20, 2017
    60
    The message feels less than vital at a time when vitality is so needed, and no, there will be no revolution off the back of the subversive royalty involved in this release. The slogans feel thin, but the music itself is substantive. Whether that counts as a success or not comes down to what you came here for.
  4. The Wire
    Oct 11, 2017
    50
    Prophets Of Rage can’t help sounding a little male-menopausal even if lyrically the targets remain crucial and the trajectory remains ferocious thanks to the sheer undimmed timbre of Chuck’s meshrattling voice. [Sep 2017, p.55]
  5. Sep 19, 2017
    46
    The band hasn’t done themselves any favors by sticking so closely to the sounds of their youth, either--not that they were ever going to top the pipe-bomb intensity of their earliest recordings, anyway.
  6. 40
    This album and The Party’s Over share many of the same problems that the band can't seem to shake off. Whether you were fan of Public Enemy, Cypress Hill or Rage Against The Machine first I think you’ll agree that this whole project just comes off as clumsy.
  7. Sep 13, 2017
    25
    It is an album of obvious statements set to equally thudding music, liable to move and inspire no one.

See all 19 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 5
  2. Negative: 2 out of 5
  1. Oct 1, 2017
    8
    I loved
    is a live album that may sound pretty good for a good slam, "Living in the 110" is the best song and then follows Un**ck the World",
    I loved
    is a live album that may sound pretty good for a good slam, "Living in the 110" is the best song and then follows Un**ck the World", but there are songs that are just stuffed like "Legalize Me"
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  2. Oct 20, 2017
    6
    These guys are all too old and financially successful to summon any real, honest-to-goodness RAGE anymore (save, perhaps, for the “Get off myThese guys are all too old and financially successful to summon any real, honest-to-goodness RAGE anymore (save, perhaps, for the “Get off my lawn, you kids!” variety), but they sure can lay down a nice, heavy funk groove. This record plays like a blend of Audioslave and early Red Hot Chili Peppers, with Chuck D’s distinctive rapping laid down over the top. Only now, nearly thirty years after “Fight the Power,” one finds Chuck’s powerful but familiar delivery more comforting than intimidating. This is an enjoyable record, but try as it might, it never really manages to feel angry. This is reminiscing with old friends, not rioting with angry revolutionaries. Expand
  3. Sep 16, 2017
    4
    A disappointing watered down version of Rage Against the Machine. The album sounds like a bunch of RATM B-sides with Chuck D and B RealA disappointing watered down version of Rage Against the Machine. The album sounds like a bunch of RATM B-sides with Chuck D and B Real rapping instead of Zack. The biggest issues with Chuck D and B Real is that their vocal styles don't fit the music. Zack had an aggressive delivery style as he put the RAGE in Rage Against the Machine. Zack's signature RAGE is absent from the album. It sounds like a bunch of happy dudes pretending to be angry. There is no genuine anger on this album. Tom Morello, the second best thing about RATM really dropped the ball here. There are a tone of recycled riffs and solos from previous RATM and Audioslave albums. It's like he's too lazy to come up with something fresh and original. "Hail to the Chief" recycles the Bulls on Parade solo. Lyrically both B Real and Chuck D lack the genius lyricism of De La Rocha. Many of the lyrics are cringe worthy. The album as a whole is incredibly formulaic and every song sounds the same. Even Nickelback has more variety in their albums than Prophets of Rage. Expand
  4. Sep 18, 2017
    3
    Other than the fact that the vocals and the instrumentals don't blend together, the fact that the guitars have too many effects on them andOther than the fact that the vocals and the instrumentals don't blend together, the fact that the guitars have too many effects on them and provide nothing interesting instrumentally, and the amazing lack of songs that actually feel rebellious rather than lame... this album at least has that one keyboard part in the first song... it's horribly underdeveloped yet it sounds bloated at the same time whilst also adding nothing new to the genre making this album completely pointless.
    Final Score: 3/10
    I like Rage Against the Machine, I kinda like Public Enemy... I really dislike this album.
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  5. Sep 17, 2017
    1
    You absolutely can't not talk about RATM when referring to this album. It's just RATM lite. The production is incredibly messy and the riffsYou absolutely can't not talk about RATM when referring to this album. It's just RATM lite. The production is incredibly messy and the riffs are weak. That's what I liked about RATM; good production and large guitar riffs. The album is just a bunch of weak riffs laid on top of equally weak political rap yells.

    There are influences from all kinds of things on top of the obvious RATM-y rap-/funk metal. There's more funk and rock on here than there is on most RATM records. And that's really the problem. This album bored me to tears! The really funky sounds don't fit at all and it's just incredibly boring.

    There's a few songs where they sound good in some way but it's just boring rap rock and funk rock/metal that really wants you to FEEEEL something about their fiery political message, but the music isn't fiery and neither is the lyrics.
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