Tha Carter III Image
Metascore
84

Universal acclaim - based on 26 Critic Reviews What's this?

User Score
7.2

Generally favorable reviews- based on 358 Ratings

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  • Summary: The latest album from the rapper includes guest appearances by Jay-Z, T-Pain, Babyface, Busta Rhymes, and Robin Thicke.

Top Track

Lollipop
Oww! Uh-huh No homo, Young Moolah baby I said he's so sweet, make her wanna lick the wrapper So I let her lick the rapper She, she, she licked me... See the rest of the song lyrics
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 26
  2. Negative: 0 out of 26
  1. It’s eclectic, eccentric and yes, essential.
  2. 90
    Maybe that's how we need to view this record--a little less anxious in our anticipation and balanced out with a little more enjoyment. Then, it just might be a classic.
  3. Instead of hiding his bootleg-bred quirks in anticipation of the big-budget spotlight, he distills the myriad metaphors, convulsing flows, and vein-splitting emotions into a commercially gratifying package that's as weird as it wants to be; he eventually finds his guitar but keeps the strumming in check.
  4. Tha Carter III hearkens to when rap meant rapp: Isaac Hayes talking for days about some girl he broke with, or Bobby Womack signifying while strumming a blues guitar.
  5. He breaks language down into building blocks for new metaphors, exploiting every possible semantic and phonetic loophole for humour and yanking pop culture references into startling new contexts.
  6. He's the man of the moment, but the disc's best moments strive for timelessness and attain it.
  7. Now, equipped with the stylish, but too-often substance-less Tha Carter III, Lil Wayne seems poised to flip the script on the “rapper racists” (radio stations, MTV) by evolving into the “biggest” rapper alive.

See all 26 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 61 out of 102
  2. Negative: 21 out of 102
  1. MatthewC
    Jun 12, 2008
    10
    In tha family, weezy done it again!!! He delivered this album with power, and has changed a lot, but for the best. Keep it up weezy!!!
  2. Sep 29, 2018
    10
    Tha Carter III was a great album. Honestly some of the "critics" are against rap culture...
  3. sashaj
    Sep 6, 2008
    10
    I was expecting good from Lil Wayne on this album considering the horrible guest appearences of him on various songs in the months prior to I was expecting good from Lil Wayne on this album considering the horrible guest appearences of him on various songs in the months prior to the release. On June 5th, a friend of mine sent me a link where I could download the album. I did, and after hearing 3 Peat and Mr. Carter I was amazed and decided that I would buy it in stores. After I bought it I thorougly listened to it and decided that this is the first album where I didn't have to skip any songs. Some might say the album did not have had a concept or a general idea but trust me it did. The general message was: All of these songs are the new Lil Wayne. Expand
  4. Aug 13, 2011
    7
    This album gets an 8 mostly because of the relative strength of a few tracks towards the beginning of the album. It's difficult to tell ifThis album gets an 8 mostly because of the relative strength of a few tracks towards the beginning of the album. It's difficult to tell if the other tracks - which are of the elite tier of production value as rap can get - are actually just slightly above average tracks or whether the heavy hitters at the beginning just make the rest of the tracks seem dull only in comparison.

    Standing far above the other top-tier tracks on this album is "A Milli", a no-holds barred surreal flow of apocryphal lil wayne non sequitors, laced with as phrases as clever and nonchalantly vulgar as it is required for Weezy to explain to us in such brilliant creative ways why he is the best. All this is set against a surprisingly palatable (assumedly hefty) dude just saying "A Milli" over and over again.

    A Milli seems to be the most revered track on the biggest studio album - 1,000,000 copies in a week, and the #1 best-selling album of 2008 - the pop-mega rap star has so far released. Known for achieving success simultaneously, if not primarily, because of underground, non-radioplay mixtape releases, the song stands on its own as a stalwart in rap's history books.

    3 Peat is a formidable beginning to any album, a firm, bold roar of the arrival of Wayne, obviously not only as the beginning of this album, but as a dominating figure in the spotlight of rap.

    With the crescendo of 3-Peat coming near the end, as soon as it brings you back from Wayne's planet to Earth, you turn right over into Mr. Carter, a relaxed track with a solid kick and a chantable chorus held up by a high-pitched Kanye-like sample. Lil Wayne's birth name being Dwayne Carter, the song speaks for his fans and friends, asking where he has been recently, while he reveals the new heights his life has reached, and through a barrel's worth of clever phrases, explains that he's been traveling all around the world being a superstar rapper. His point is capped off when another Mr. Carter, Shawn Carter, aka Jay-Z pops in to say, yes, I am a legend and, yes, we few superstar rappers are too hard to catch, a true jet setter. Keep 'em searchin.

    In full disclosure, the author of this article has as a surname Carter, so feels a certain affinity for this track. Hopefully this wasn't evident.

    If you haven't heard Lollipop and are an American and under 35, I'm guessing you have never been social in a public place. That American part might be irrelevant. Lollipop was a genuine radioplay megahit, indeed the best selling digital single of 2008, and is one of the reasons Wayne remains interesting to critics - and labels - alike: he can please intellectual Pitchfork critics while blowing up the pockets of the radio conglomerates. The other tracks on this album suffers from common-rap album syndrome. At times, listening from beginning to end, it feels too disjointed due to the sheer quantity of producers submitting different types of tracks to what's supposed to be a like-minded compilation. That said, the all-star producers who composed Tha Carter iii - from Swizz Beatz to David Banner to Kanye - definitely do their job individually.

    Yet still, the themes of this album are scatterbrained, despite, obviously all being loosely based around the fact that Lil Wayne, is in fact, "Ill, not sick," an expert rapper and lyrically genius. Of course, this isn't actually far from the truth, but this album ends up being much more a bunch of interesting tracks featuring a five-star rapper and a few of his peers and forefathers, than a classic album.
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  5. Jan 2, 2012
    6
    Guilty pleasure pop/rap album. It's very fun and the final respectable Lil' Wayne album. Mr. Carter is Maybe his best song ever (but he stillGuilty pleasure pop/rap album. It's very fun and the final respectable Lil' Wayne album. Mr. Carter is Maybe his best song ever (but he still thinks he's better than he is) Expand
  6. LiamF
    Nov 18, 2009
    4
    This album is alright but used to really like lil wayne during his earlier albums, IE Pre "Tha Carter" and some Carter songs. To someone who This album is alright but used to really like lil wayne during his earlier albums, IE Pre "Tha Carter" and some Carter songs. To someone who hasn't really heard weezy before this album and before he became really mainstream this is a good album but to fans of his it really isn't. Expand
  7. ANormalPerson
    Jul 8, 2008
    0
    I agree with datsun and all the other low scores. technically rap isn't music, so how can you give it a metascore?

See all 102 User Reviews