• Record Label: Columbia
  • Release Date: Mar 31, 2017
Metascore
80

Generally favorable reviews - based on 21 Critic Reviews

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 21
  2. Negative: 0 out of 21
Buy On
  1. Mar 30, 2017
    100
    Though all but one (Beggin’) were recorded by Frank Sinatra, Dylan is unintimidated by their pedigree.
  2. Mar 28, 2017
    100
    You can hear allusions Dylan has made to some of these lyrics in his own work over the last few decades, which makes the collection all the more revelatory. And he sings as gorgeously and clearly as he possibly can, as if it’s more important to him than ever that we feel his love.
  3. Mar 30, 2017
    90
    A song isn't a song without melody, harmony and voice. Time and again he proves the same thing on Triplicate.
  4. Mar 28, 2017
    90
    The world is undeniably richer for his guided tour through the trove of songs that helped lay the foundation for American music.
  5. Mar 29, 2017
    87
    Triplicate allows us to experience the rare and intimate pleasure of listening to an artist connect with, and express the subtle and infinite joys suggested by a great song.
  6. Mar 31, 2017
    83
    Dylan has grown into that role, whether through divine inspiration or sheer repetition. He’s musically simpatico with his veteran touring band, and like Joni Mitchell on her later records, his voice has deepened, developed an appealing smokiness.
  7. The Wire
    Aug 8, 2017
    80
    Triplicate’s greatest triumph is to strip cheap sentiment from the poetry by dimming the lacquer of the brass and muting the swagger of the singer, leaving the songs to crackle like revenant vignettes in the wireless of the mind. [May 2017, p.63]
  8. Apr 18, 2017
    80
    While Dylan fans surely miss his original tunes, this honest, affecting tribute to a bygone era of music is a treat in itself.
  9. Apr 7, 2017
    80
    Triplicate proves that his ability to interpret the Great American Songbook is equally worthy of recognition.
  10. Apr 6, 2017
    80
    His delivery is tender and delicate, his phrasing measured and sharp, and to the point that the voice cracks and flat notes that do inevitably arise seem by design, only adding to his emotional vulnerability. Acting as producer under his pseudonym Jack Frost, Dylan pristinely captures the subtle dynamics of his live touring band, adding only subdued horn charts by James Harper.
  11. 80
    It’s a wisely curated selection--despite these not being Dylan’s lyrics, it’s impossible to listen to the likes of September of My Years and not hear the resonance of autobiography.
  12. Mar 31, 2017
    80
    Triplicate is not a shining hour for Dylan when put into the full context of his fifty-plus-year career. But nonetheless, his insuppressible spirit is baked into every moonstruck moment.
  13. Mar 31, 2017
    80
    If Dylan learned anything from Sinatra, it's how to drill to the core of the song. Dylan does just that on Triplicate, finding the heart beating within some old warhorses and placing them within several great American musical traditions, and that's why this cements his place as one of the most distinctive interpreters of the Great American Songbook.
  14. Magnet
    Apr 14, 2017
    75
    He's all over the phrasing but never sloppily and always expeessively. [No. 141, p.52]
  15. 75
    It’s a truly overwhelming amount of a somewhat good thing.
  16. Uncut
    Mar 28, 2017
    70
    For all its easy charms, Triplicate labours its point to the brink of overkill. After five albums' worth of croon toons, this feels like a fat full stop on a fascinating chapter. [May 2017, p.22]
  17. 65
    The sheer volume of material on offer soon succumbs to the law of diminishing returns.
  18. Apr 6, 2017
    65
    One does get the sense of life behind these performances, of private experience refracted through universal sentiment, of hard knocks transubstantiated into easy wisdom, but, as is often the case with Bob Dylan, the drama remains mostly internal.
  19. Q Magazine
    Apr 12, 2017
    60
    Certainly, there's an absurdity about the great man wrapping his frail tonsils around vocally acrobatic piece like Stormy Weather. Yet, his passion for the task of rescuing these poetic tunes from cultural obscurity is palpable. [Jun 2017, p.106]
  20. Mar 30, 2017
    60
    Occasional lines jerk out of the mix as Dylan struggles for control of his vocal chords. But his unique phrasing and delivery is usually right on the nose of the song’s meaning.
  21. Mojo
    Mar 28, 2017
    60
    Triplicate lacks the revelatory impact of Shadows In The Night. And you always wish there was more light, inside these pocket-size arrangements. ... But this kind of immersion--in folk, blues or Sinatra--has always been serious business and rejuvenation to him: looking for answers and a way forward in a pasture of plenty. [May 2017, p.90]
User Score
7.8

Generally favorable reviews- based on 18 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 15 out of 18
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 18
  3. Negative: 3 out of 18
  1. Mar 23, 2020
    9
    I dont need to listen all the album, with I could have told you I'm ok. Thanks bobi, hope coronavirus dont kill u
  2. Mar 6, 2019
    9
    I was always a fan of Dylan's music, especially his oldest albums, but during the '80s his music loss Quality, but he still was a greatI was always a fan of Dylan's music, especially his oldest albums, but during the '80s his music loss Quality, but he still was a great artist, now he released this album, this great album, especially for today's standards, Dylan is great as always, despite his never a great singer and a great great composer!!! Full Review »
  3. Apr 5, 2017
    9
    I've never been a fan of this kind of music. I am 55 years old and have always found it to be very antiquated sounding. Dylan, however, hasI've never been a fan of this kind of music. I am 55 years old and have always found it to be very antiquated sounding. Dylan, however, has such an infectious fondness for his material that it is hard not appreciate its charms. It also helps that his band is awesome. Full Review »