User Score
6.2

Generally favorable reviews- based on 13 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 13
  2. Negative: 3 out of 13

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  1. Apr 21, 2015
    4
    Ardent Butthole puritans will no doubt be a little disappointed with this effort. A somewhat commercial attempt in reclaiming their former glory, all be it an unsuccessful one! There are a few numbers that try and hold the album together but it isn't enough. A relatively weak album by their own standards.
  2. TraderWoody
    Oct 9, 2001
    7
    Don't expect locust abortion technician, but the Buttholes still stomp on the average chumps out there
  3. RyanW
    Jun 30, 2006
    10
    awesome album
  4. GuttedPete
    Jul 7, 2007
    0
    the buttholes have been my favourite band for 20 years. this album made my fingers go numb with shock at it's awfulness, and for the first time made me regret my 18 year old buttholes tattoo. it's closer to 'they might be giants' than 'the shah sleeps in lee harvey's grave. i think i'm going to cry...
  5. MikeL.
    Sep 22, 2001
    0
    it sux
  6. bobbyj
    Sep 19, 2003
    10
    Feed your children on acid and this album.
  7. NateK
    Jan 17, 2007
    10
    BHS best album, none of there other albums have this much of a meaning and it hits you on the first song, join the Weird Revolution people, I will admit that there a a few key songs on other BHS albums that have to be noted, some as good and some better than those on this album, but none have as many great tracks on one album. Basicly we dont want weirdness from the normal man, We do not BHS best album, none of there other albums have this much of a meaning and it hits you on the first song, join the Weird Revolution people, I will admit that there a a few key songs on other BHS albums that have to be noted, some as good and some better than those on this album, but none have as many great tracks on one album. Basicly we dont want weirdness from the normal man, We do not want to be freaked out by the normal man, We want to out freak the normal man. Expand
  8. DavidH.
    Nov 10, 2001
    4
    weak
  9. Aug 27, 2019
    10
    A rather polarizing outing from the Surfers on their last release (Although, they are deep within the works of an upcoming record. I am especially psyched about it, particularly as they have much more control and no real specific finish date.) which feels eons ago.

    The backstory of this album includes aliens and Native Americans, serious pressure from the label concerning
    A rather polarizing outing from the Surfers on their last release (Although, they are deep within the works of an upcoming record. I am especially psyched about it, particularly as they have much more control and no real specific finish date.) which feels eons ago.

    The backstory of this album includes aliens and Native Americans, serious pressure from the label concerning "radio-friendly" material and cost/date limitations. Is this the band at their most unhinged or most creative? Hardly. Then why such a high score? Nostalgia aside (I actually saw them the one and only time while during this tour. I was just much too young to have access to their shows), Gibby Haynes and co. are actually sold songwriters. These songs are structured. Many the cliche, formulaic scaffolding of verse-chorus-verse. But, with the exception of Dracula From Houston (which was utilized quite often, including on the Scrubs soundtrack. Good job, label compromise and commercialization) they are genuinely solid songs. Purists will undoubtedly be appalled, and the polish on this album can't be ignored.

    Which isn't to say the "weirdness" on Weird Revolution is false advertising. Had this been nearly any other group, it's avant-garde nature will surely be a turn off to the masses. This record unfortunately falls square in the middle of being unappealing to both their base as well as Billboard. However, I do know this record gained some new fans. If one wanted to try venturing towards the unconventional but not wade too deep, this is a good venture. And indeed, with hits like The Shame of Life (being someone a parody of Kid Rock, while encapsulating his best qualities) and Venus, the palpability of those melodies are ear pleasing and introduced the band to many who otherwise would be oblivious.

    Hayne's old group The Jackofficers (despite only releasing one album, they were actually influential and ahead of their time with samples and weird indie-electro) have much influence in this revolution. And therein lies the unusual wedding of influences for this outing. Songs like Intelligent Guy, Mexico, They Came In (thought the After the Astronaut version is immensely beter), and The Last Astronaut all clearly have the Surfer's trademark approaches and contain just as much bizarreness as any of their prior records. It's just done so in a cleaner recording, leaving it more sanitized. And Jet Fighter is frankly one of the best songs ever written, let alone this album. I can't believe how few people have even heard it, nearly every single person I've played it for loved it. And this album is vastly underrated and unfortunately and unfairly criminalized. I can't wait for their next album, coming out soon. Allegedly.
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Metascore
46

Mixed or average reviews - based on 9 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 9
  2. Negative: 3 out of 9
  1. Entertainment Weekly
    58
    A typical morass of computerized beat science, vague exoticism, and singer Gibby Haynes' crackpot mantras... [7 Sep 2001, p.164]
  2. The Butthole Surfers have finally become shocking only in their sheer banality, like a watered-down mix of the worst Beck and Perry Farrell material you can imagine.
  3. Weird Revolution sounds dated and quaint, both in its "Pepper" rehashes ("Dracula From Houston," "The Shame Of Life") and in its halfhearted attempts at caustic shock ("Shit Like That") and misfit mission statements ("The Weird Revolution").