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Robert Pattinson's Best Movies, Ranked by Metacritic

From 'Harry Potter' to 'Tenet,' 'The Batman' star Robert Pattinson's highest-rated movies span a wide range of roles. Discover the best, ranked by Metascore.

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Robert Pattinson

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Robert Pattinson fans already know that his résumé has some very interesting roles on it, to say the least. 

Dabbling in everything from wizards to vampires, as well as psychological thrillers bordering on the insane, Pattinson has never been one to shy away from a role that others may consider weird. Alas, this is what makes Pattinson's work so fascinating to dig into. 

Though fans of some of his most mainstream films — like Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and the Twilight franchise — may not be as familiar with some of his other work, it's where the actor truly shines. And while some of his older, more indie titles (Little Ashes) may not be some of the highest rated, at least by critical standards, they're still a must-watch for any Pattinson fan.

Some of Pattinson's best work, which you'll find ahead, is firmly settled in the thriller category, so if you're a fan of movies that keep you on the edge of your seat, you'll find plenty here to keep you busy. The Batman star has taken on a number of roles that allow him to play up the suspense in a movie, leaving you gripping your chair while you watch a mystery unfold. And while he's also taken on roles in other genres, thrillers remain where his highest-rated roles fall.

If you're curious about Pattinson's catalog of work, you should make time to watch some of his best films. Here, Metacritic highlights Pattinson's top 10 movies, ranked by Metascore.


The Lighthouse

Metascore: 83
Best for: Fans of psychological thrillers that will leave you thinking
Where to watch: 

, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu
Runtime: 109 minutes

Filmed in black and white for maximum drama, 2019's The Lighthouse follows two men alone at a lighthouse slowly spiraling into insanity. Ephraim Winslow (Pattinson) takes on a job at the lighthouse working under the supervision of the keeper, Thomas Wake (Willem Dafoe). The two are at odds almost instantly, with Thomas forcing Ephraim into menial tasks, pushing his brain closer and closer to the brink of breaking. Soon, though, Thomas finds that Ephraim isn't at all who he says he is, and insanity is closer than they both thought. 

"By turns funny, sinister, haunting, historically fascinating and mythical, The Lighthouse is one of the best films of the year." — Sara Stewart, New York Post


Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Metascore: 81
Best for: Harry Potter fans, of course
Where to watch:

, Google Play, HBO Max, iTunes, PeacockVudu
Runtime: 157 minutes

In the fourth film in the Harry Potter series, the witches and wizards are invited to the Triwizard Tournament. Pattinson plays Cedric Diggory, the Hogwarts champion chosen to compete against a wizard from Durmstrang and a witch from Beauxbatons Academy of Magic. But of course, Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe) himself also finds a way to compete in the tournament. The four champions go up against dragons, sea creatures, and each other as they compete for the ultimate title and the chance to raise the chalice of champions — the Triwizard Cup.

"The best one yet." — Kirk Honeycutt, The Hollywood Reporter


Good Time

Metascore: 80
Best for: Fans of high-intensity thrillers and the Safdie brothers
Where to watch: 

, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu
Runtime: 101 minutes

Good Time, a 2017 movie by the Safdie brothers, stars Pattinson as Connie, a man who robs a bank with his brother, Nick (Benny Safdie). Nick is caught by police and thrown in jail, so it's Connie's mission to try to get him out. He doesn't have the money he needs, and after calling on his girlfriend (played by Jennifer Jason Leigh) for help, he still can't pull the money together that he needs. Connie falls farther and farther into trouble while trying to come up with the money, all while Nick sits waiting for his brother to save him.

"The wild night eventually turns downright rabid, but ­Pattinson anchors Good Time, completely selling Connie from the moment he bursts into the frame and delivering the best performance of his career." — Kevin P. Sullivan, Entertainment Weekly


The Lost City of Z

Metascore: 78
Best for: Fans of adventure films with heart
Where to watch: 

, Google Play, iTunesVudu
Runtime: 141 minutes

Based on the book of the same name, 2016's The Lost City of Z stars Charlie Hunnam as a British explorer named Percy Fawcett, who in his travels finds a lost city in the Amazon. What looks to be a place that once thrived in nature, it has become a shell of its former self. In his quest to share his findings with the world, Percy goes back time and time again, learning more and more about the world around him. Pattinson stars as Corporal Henry Costin, one of Percy's colleagues who aids in his exploration of the forgotten city.

"A film as transporting, profound and staggering in its emotional power as anything I've seen in the cinema in years." — Robbie Collin, The Telegraph


High Life

Metascore: 77
Best for: Mystery lovers and fans of science fiction
Where to watch: 

, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu
Runtime: 113 minutes

What would you do if you were a death row inmate and you were told you can leave prison but you have to go to space and take part in experiments? That's what the criminals in High Life are offered. Pattinson stars as Monte in the 2018 flick, a man who was convicted of murder and sentenced to death. Along with a group of people, he's sent into space with the agreement that they'll be subject to experiments by Dr. Dibs (Juliette Binoche) and also try to find alternative energy in a black hole. 

"High Life is too layered, too ambiguous, too potent to be about any one thing." — Sophie Monks Kaufman, Little White Lies


The Batman

Metascore: 72
Best for: Fans of dark vigilante dramas, long movies, and DC comics
Where to watch: In theaters
Runtime: 175 minutes

Pattinson dons the vigilante suit in Matt Reeves' reboot of the Batman franchise, which was released in March 2022. The film begins with serial killer the Riddler (Paul Dano) claiming Gotham City's mayor as his latest villain, which puts Pattinson's Bruce Wayne aka Batman on the case. At almost three hours long, The Batman is a lengthy look at the criminal underbelly of the city, with the titular character being taunted by the Riddler, meeting important new citizens (most notably Zoë Kravitz's Selina Kyle), working alongside police commissioner James Gordon (Jeffrey Wright), and trying to stop the savage killer and clean up the corruption in Gotham City.

"This grounded, frequently brutal and nearly three-hour film noir registers among the best of the genre." — Peter Debruge, Variety


Tenet

Metascore: 69
Best for: Thrill seekers and fans of Christopher Nolan movies
Where to watch: 

, Google Play, HBO Max, iTunes, Vudu
Runtime: 150 minutes

John David Washington is an unnamed protagonist in this 2020 sci-fi thriller, who is recruited by a mysterious operative known as Tenet and given Neil (Pattinson) as his handler. The protagonist is given a mission and soon learns that in this new world order, time has no meaning and functions completely separately from what he's always known. He now must work with time and his accomplices to stop World War III from happening.

"Tenet reaches for cinematic greatness and, though it doesn't quite reach that lofty goal, it's the kind of film that reminds us of the magic of the moviegoing experience." — Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun Times


The Childhood of a Leader

Metascore: 68
Best for: Fans of dark, historical dramas
Where to watch: 

, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu
Runtime: 115 minutes

This dark film from 2015, loosely based on Jean-Paul Sartre's story of the same name, is a terrifying look at what it could have been like growing up in a fascist world just after World War I. A young boy named Prescott (Tom Sweet) has all the markings of a troubled child and no one in his life to keep him on the right path toward a prosperous adult life. Instead, he follows a dark trail deeper into fascism, discovering pieces of himself he never realized were buried deep within. Pattinson stars as the older version of Prescott — with a twist.

"A dark, enigmatic piece of work that hovers between visionary greatness and petty domestic triviality." — John Bleasdale, Cinevue


Maps to the Stars

Metascore: 67
Best for: Fans of satirical takes on family and Hollywood
Where to watch: 

, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu
Runtime: 101 minutes

Meet the Weiss family: They're a Hollywood family whose lives revolve around 13-year-old Benjie (Evan Bird), a child star in this 2014 satire. Their family is incredibly messed up, including the fact that Benjie's sister Agatha (Mia Wasikowska) has been shunned, and parents Cristina (Olivia Williams) and Stafford (John Cusack) are siblings. In the inevitable drama of Hollywood, this family is also dealing with an aging starlet (played by Julianne Moore) who employs Stafford, Agatha and Jerome (Pattinson), the limo driver, who is probably the most sane person in the bunch.

"You can laugh with Maps to the Stars, but you can't laugh it off. Prepare to be knocked for a loop." — Peter Travers, Rolling Stone


The Rover

Metascore: 64
Best for: Fans of Westerns
Where to watch: 

, Google Play, iTunes, Vudu
Runtime: 103 minutes

It's past the end of times in 2014's The Rover. Eric (Guy Pearce) is on a mission to seek revenge on those who took the last thing he had to his name — his car. He sets out to do just that, leaving Reynolds (Pattinson) behind after he's injured. However, Reynolds can't be counted out, and Eric eventually tows him along. In a violent display, Eric takes out whoever he needs to do to get to the bottom of what happened to his car, though no one can quite figure out why the car is of such importance to him in the first place. But at this point, Eric has nothing else to lose.

"The Rover is less an allegory than a suggestion how bad things could become. It's well made, and it's disturbing, if not overly passion inducing." — Diane Garrett, The Wrap

(UPDATED: This story was updated on March 4, 2022 to include The Batman.)