Bill Foster (VIII)

Biography: The story of "The Fox" actually began on the Westwood campus of UCLA, where Foster was a border at a fraternity house. He got his first job performing at The Nickelodeon, a small pub at the corner of McClellan and Wilshire Blvd., and was later hired to work at the Mammoth Mountain Inn. He quickly tired of working for others, however, and decided to strike out on his own.

For more than four decades, Foster was somewhat of a local legend in barrooms across Los Angeles (at least to the crowd that first learned He was the self-proclaimed "World's Fastest Beer Drinker" -- able to guzzle a pint of brew quicker than most of us could spill it on the floor -- and a master performer of what he called "songs your mother wouldn't sing." Foster was best known as proprietor of the Fox Inn, a popular west side tavern, from 1961 to 1989. He performed there nightly, leading his patrons in song and often challenging unsuspecting beer drinkers to chugging races. But the highlight of each
The story of "The Fox" actually began on the Westwood campus of UCLA, where Foster was a border at a fraternity house. He got his first job performing at The Nickelodeon, a small pub at the corner of McClellan and Wilshire Blvd., and was later hired to work at the Mammoth Mountain Inn. He quickly tired of working for others, however, and decided to strike out on his own.

For more than four decades, Foster was somewhat of a local legend in barrooms across Los Angeles (at least to the crowd that first learned He was the self-proclaimed "World's Fastest Beer Drinker" -- able to guzzle a pint of brew quicker than most of us could spill it on the floor -- and a master performer of what he called "songs your mother wouldn't sing."

Foster was best known as proprietor of the Fox Inn, a popular west side tavern, from 1961 to 1989. He performed there nightly, leading his patrons in song and often challenging unsuspecting beer drinkers to chugging races. But the highlight of each night was to see Foster chug a pint of beer while standing on his head.

It wasn't long before Foster's combination of naughty lymrics and stupid human tricks began turning heads in Hollywood. Although his act was sometimes considered too outrageous for primetime, he became a frequent guest star on local and national television programs, including The Jeffersons, Taxi, The Mike Douglas Show and Thicke of The Night.

Foster briefly faded from the public eye in the late '90s, but discovered a whole new audience on cable television. In the summer of 2000, he combined the duties of emcee, house band and sidekick to stars Adam Carolla and Jimmy Kimmel on Comedy Central's top-rated hit, The Man Show.

Above taken from - http://www.ultimateguy.com/ultimateguy/billthefox.html
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