Rob Schrab

Biography: Rob Schrab started out drawing comics on a kitchen table in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It was only appropriate that he’d grow up to become the creator of the massive indie hit comic book “Scud: The Disposable Assassin.”
The violent, yet, very funny adventures of a self-destructing vending-machine robot assassin earned “Scud” a loyal following over the course of its 20 issues and assorted spin-offs.
But for Schrab, creating comic books was a stepping stone to a bigger goal of his – making movies. Scrab said, “I’ve always wanted to work in the industry. Whenever I did comic books, I tried to do them more like storyboards rather than traditional splash-page comic books. I wanted them to be more cinematic.” An art school student in the day and stand-up and improv comedian by night, Schrab eventually joined the comedy group the Dead Alewives. That led to a Dungeons & Dragons skit, which later turned into the popular CGI short “Summoner Geeks.” After college, Schrab pursued a
Rob Schrab started out drawing comics on a kitchen table in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It was only appropriate that he’d grow up to become the creator of the massive indie hit comic book “Scud: The Disposable Assassin.”
The violent, yet, very funny adventures of a self-destructing vending-machine robot assassin earned “Scud” a loyal following over the course of its 20 issues and assorted spin-offs.
But for Schrab, creating comic books was a stepping stone to a bigger goal of his – making movies. Scrab said, “I’ve always wanted to work in the industry. Whenever I did comic books, I tried to do them more like storyboards rather than traditional splash-page comic books. I wanted them to be more cinematic.”
An art school student in the day and stand-up and improv comedian by night, Schrab eventually joined the comedy group the Dead Alewives. That led to a Dungeons & Dragons skit, which later turned into the popular CGI short “Summoner Geeks.”
After college, Schrab pursued a successful illustration and cartooning career. He used his earnings to finance the self-published “Scud,” which he wrote with writing partner Dan Harmon. “Scud” also became a video game for Sega’s Saturn system.
Schrab and Harmon moved out to California to write the screen play for “Scud.” However, the project went nowhere leaving Schrab burnt out, but the pair rebounded by writing a spec script called “Big Ant Movie,” about giant ants hell-bent on taking over the world. The script got them representation with the United Talent Agency. They soon got a two-picture deal with ImageMovers, and wrote the screenplay to “Monster House.”
In the meantime, they met with Ben Stiller who asked Harmon and Schrab to create something for up-and-coming actor named Jack Black.
Basing a character on Black’s persona, Harmon and Schrab wrote the script for “Heat Vision and Jack,” a pilot helmed by Stiller. The series starred Black as Jack Austin, a former astronaut who acquired superhuman intelligence when exposed to sunlight. The 1999 pilot generated an incredible amount of buzz within the industry, but ended up being rejected by Fox. Nonetheless, “Heat Vision and Jack” generated an enormous online following as evidenced by the more than 400,000 views the pilot has received on YouTube.
They’ve also worked with Black and a number of other talents as part of Channel 101 , a monthly screening of five-minute “pilots.” Not only have established talents like Black and Drew Carey participated, but it’s also helped give starts to talents like Tim Heidecker, Eric Wareheim and Andy Samberg.
The show spawned the VH1 series, “Acceptable.TV,” which Schrab and Harmon will produce with Black.
Schrab also recently finished work on a new Comedy Central series with Sarah Silverman, which premiered in Febuary 2007. Schrab helped write all six episodes, and directed four of them.
Schrab also tried music videos out when he received the opportunity to do a video of Death Cab for Cutie’s song “Crooked Teeth” for their Directions DVD.
Although his career has turned to movies and television, Schrab has recently returned to his roots after a ten year hiatus with the final installment to “Scud: The Disposable Assassin.” The book will feature all 20 issues of the cult classic as well as the final chapter of the disposable robot. It’s due out summer 2007 from Image comics.
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Rob Schrab's Scores

Average career score: 73
Highest Metascore: 85 Rick & Morty: Season 1
Lowest Metascore: 58 Parks and Recreation: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 6 out of 7
  2. Negative: 0 out of 7
7 tv reviews
Title: Year: Credit: User score:
tbd Rick & Morty: Season 2 Jul 26, 2015 Star 9.4
68 Big Time in Hollywood, FL: Season 1 Mar 25, 2015 Director 6.8
85 Rick & Morty: Season 1 Dec 2, 2013 Star / Alexander / Tom Randolph 9.4
82 Community: Season 3 Sep 22, 2011 Director 8.9
83 Parks and Recreation: Season 3 Jan 20, 2011 Director 8.9
tbd The Sarah Silverman Program: Season 3 Feb 4, 2010 Writer / Director tbd
69 Community: Season 1 Sep 17, 2009 Director 8.8
58 Parks and Recreation: Season 1 Apr 9, 2009 Director 7.7
tbd The Sarah Silverman Program: Season 2 Oct 3, 2007 Writer / Director tbd
64 The Sarah Silverman Program: Season 1 Feb 1, 2007 Writer / Director / Creator / Executive Producer 5.0
tbd Drew Carey's Green Screen Show: Season 1 Oct 7, 2004 Director tbd