Beats Per Minute's Scores

  • Music
For 1,197 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 Life's Rich Pageant
Lowest review score: 18 If Not Now, When?
Score distribution:
1197 music reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    On Reflection, we truly see the breadth of her resourcefulness as an artist: both as translator and purveyor of gut feeling. The elemental building blocks are all you need to shape something completely new.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    His choruses don’t jump out at you so much as slink by, which is not always a bad thing, but maybe not what you want from pop music. ... Every song on Changephobia sounds like it has an inch-thick layer of dust on it, but if you take a finger and smear that off, there’s a beautiful ice-cream paint-job below.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Although this is an album about oneness, we are here for Peng, and these moments where we feel closest to her as a person are some of the most rewarding.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 71 Critic Score
    The album is the sound of Penelope pushing back, deciding that the closing of motherhood is not the end of her life. She’s confident and resolute in spirit and vision. It’s art defined by ageing and it’s all the more powerful for it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    There’s a depth and sensual nuance to the album that most of her contemporaries lack.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 61 Critic Score
    At its worst, The Tunnel and the Clearing sounds akin to lovely if too-inoffensive loading screen music. At its best, it’s bewitching and intriguing. Overall, Schott still has much to give, and much to offer this particular genre of minimalistic abstract pop, but she may need to do more next time around to take her considerable skills even further.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    This album embraces you like your favorite seat, preserving your outline intimately in its fabric.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 52 Critic Score
    Monthly Friend is serviceable indie rock at best, but it’s hard to meet it with anything greater than apathy and indifference.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    Blood is an undeniably fun album brimming with indie-pop sensibilities and anthemic energy that makes listeners want to sing along.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Cavalcade is an experience album, one that lingers long after it’s over. It calls to you from the basement.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Overall, Frontera retains the qualities that fans of Fly Pan Am always appreciated about the collective, but this time around they feel disconnected. That is not to say the album is bad, it simply appears that it cannot be properly appreciated without the aid of the dance performance by Animals Of Distinction.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    At times, take the cake feels like it’s at an ennui crossroads, trying to define listlessness while side-stepping its intentions. But how many artists have we seen hover around an emotional bullseye on their first album only to hit it on their next go-round? Even if take the cake doesn’t show PACKS’ full potential, it still gives us much to look forward to.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Throughout Showtunes, Wagner demonstrates that theatricality and showmanship can manifest in many different and sometimes subtle forms. He may not draw in many new fans from this one-act performance, but it’s still one of the band’s most intriguing and well-executed productions nonetheless.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    CHAI see no line whatsoever between taking on whatever issues get to them and being able to completely bliss out, and it’s this very energy that continues to make them absolutely essential. WINK is simply the warmest, most open way they’ve chosen to engage in that battle yet.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Mannequin Pussy may not have necessarily progressed hugely, they have found thrilling new ways to implement the sounds that made Patience such a success. Most excitingly, the little glimpses of new ideas and chemistry suggest it’s just a stepping stone to what’s next.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    It’s music for mending the soul and opening the eyes of skeptics to what music – what really good music – can do for us. No matter what walks of life we come from, there’s legitimate emotion attached to Mdou Moctar’s music, and it should shake any living, breathing being right to their core.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 71 Critic Score
    The lightness of touch and tone on The Power of Rocks imbues it all with an easy energy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    With Indian Yard, there’s a feeling we might not yet know the full identity of Ya Tseen, but a future release without such reliance on partnerships will surely enlighten. There’s enough thoughtful layering and earnest emotion (“At Tugáni” is where he shows this most, notably in a song named after his son) in Indian Yard to merit further exploration.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    With The Monster Who Hated Pennsylvania, Jurado has released another moving and memorable album, gaining further traction in what might be considered the third phase of his career.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Haram feels like the truest representation what they set out to do at the start of their journey as a duo. As a result, it finds them asking the questions everyone is avoiding.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    It’s a rich tapestry of sound, message and meaning with multiple layers to unpick with each listen.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Like anyone daring to take a glimpse into the future, Hutchings is met with confusion, astonishment and alienation. Fortunately, he assimilates the tools, knowledge and creative bandwidth to acutely document them, and more importantly, navigate them in a useful, inherently joyous way.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    It’s a topsy-turvy balancing act that she’s playing, but for the most part it’s successful. Clark flips between that groovy funk of the 70s, then back to her guitar rock days, and then, sure, she employs some more experimental and electronic moments that might come across as jarring to some. But it’s also just part of the brand that is St. Vincent in 2021.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    On her sophomore effort, Monsters, Kennedy doubles down on the eclectic nature of her music, offering up a lengthy set of songs that range from experimental electronica to a capella ballads.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    Although it’s not without some flaws, mainly lying within its familiarity, Anything Can’t Happen is a terrific album from Dorothea Paas, whose career will hopefully only go up from here.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s inevitably a Portishead vibe throughout, but it doesn’t hinder the sound of Ice Melt or reduce Crumb to imitator status – it simply compliments the ethereal sound they’re going for, and remarkably succeed at.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Seek Shelter isn’t the big, era-defining statement, but a transitional album for the quintet, opening up the possibility of rock’n’roll in their arsenal. While this stylistic choice doesn’t fit 2021’s overarching trends, it proves just how good Iceage are at transforming their sonic interests into full-blown epics.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Squid’s music is full of: humanity and the inherent hope within it. It’s what makes Bright Green Field a joy to return to time and again.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 34 Critic Score
    Van Weezer is the definition of a modern Weezer album: if you go in expecting it to be as dumb and forgettable as other recent Weezer albums, you’re going to get exactly that.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 68 Critic Score
    It helps make clear that Endless Arcade is a quiet record that helps reaffirm Teenage Fanclub’s enduring appeal: their songs can help dull the pain. And pain there is.