Beats Per Minute's Scores

  • Music
For 1,632 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 Achtung Baby [Super Deluxe]
Lowest review score: 18 If Not Now, When?
Score distribution:
1632 music reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    Beer has opted for a generally more cohesive sound. While some tracks do run the risk of sounding samey in terms of production, the main strengths of this album lie in Beer’s powerful voice and transparent lyrics.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    Their voice is more supple and sensual than we’ve heard before, even as they present themselves as anhedonic, numbed by “meaningless space”.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    The King is full of voices, both his own and those of the ones he sings about and for, and that communion is one of the album’s biggest strengths. It does maintain some habits that threaten to curdle the gravity of his songs into preciousness or melodrama, like his quivering vibrato and theatrical mannerisms (at times, the songs almost sound like folky musical theatre numbers). But, overall, these nitpicked conflicts don’t negate the sheer power of what Anjimile has constructed here.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 69 Critic Score
    Berninger’s vocal delivery is largely muted; the mercurial and even passive-aggressive eruptions of the 00s are all but gone; rather, there’s a downcast directness here, which at times is compelling in the way that self-revelation and truth-telling can be; at other times, such singularity seems glaringly reductive, a listener wishing for the metaphors, tortuous narratives, and volatile phrasing of earlier work.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    It’s a seamless and natural progression from when the band released squeaky-clean interpretations of their beloved 2020 album Brave Faces Everyone, just last year on Brave Faces Etc. But they’ve buckled down, tightened things up, and now observe sheen and a bit of grit with an impressive balance.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their debut was filled with promise and, on their third album, Nation Of Language have kept that promise.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The album’s brevity only adds to the allure, as it is stripped of any excess, and devoid of a single misstep. It is a distinct departure, but ultimately unsurprising in its flawless execution.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    These songs show that Rodrigo isn’t done after GUTS.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    It’s not a perfect album – “Blue” feels slightly underdeveloped and I question whether the Robyn Hitchcock cover is completely necessary – but it doesn’t have to be. It’s mysterious, slightly messy at times, and filled with a gentle wonder that settles onto our skin like early morning sunlight. It’s a privilege to be in his company once again, even if it is just for 40 or so minutes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    The majority of Playing Robots Into Heaven is still very good, but the album is missing the skyscraping highs of past tracks like “The Wilhelm Scream” or “Retrograde”, and its cohesiveness is hampered by a few lesser songs that have slipped past the slackened quality control department.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Hard to categorise, and impossible to assess immediately, like all of Slowdive, everything is alive will ever blossom with time.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    The dire gloom of the early years is gone, and the garbled mutations of Some Rap Songs and Feet of Clay have grown in clarity without losing any of their labyrinthine and gothic dynamics. Without calling a masterpiece just yet: this is a very special moment, both for Thebe and his fans. I leave the rest to Two-Face and the flip of his coin.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    It’s outside the lines at times and consists of hues and shades you might not expect, but this is what makes Fragile Plane a fascinating listening experience.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Her vision of R&B is unfiltered and uncompromising. At her most modern, she is advancing her genre rather than watering it down for current tastes. Things her songwriting could only hint at in the work of others are here in full, and they make for a beautiful end product.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Everyone Else is a Stranger might hook in a few new fans, but they will find better work with further exploration into Lindstrøm’s discography. For everyone else, all you need to know is that it’s just Lindstrøm doing what he does best, which is no bad thing from space disco royalty.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    A solidly realized full-length record, Radio Red is a welcome addition to an already outstanding catalog.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 69 Critic Score
    While Smiling spreaded itself thin at times, Owusu sounds more settled on Struggler and contorts his voice less.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    There is plenty of fun and escapism of the sort that gave Jepsen her well-earned reputation in the popsphere, but in terms of her progression as an artist, its most striking tracks prove to be the ones that are more self-focused.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    It’s Noname’s most convincing album yet – as a whole, it defies any attempt to be embraced as “mainstream” or “digestible”.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Brazen and charming, it’s the album of this summer.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    This is very, very good – better than the rest. Analysis seems to make no sense when the art is so enormously enjoyable.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s at a crossroads between being many things: a moving resurrection; an impressive display of a talent we didn’t think we’d hear again; a slightly shambolic jam sesh; and more. Its coconspirator too often wears her sincere giddy passion for Mitchell on her sleeve (she may as well say “it came true” at some point), but it’s surely at least in good faith.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    It’s a shame nothing about it screams new pop culture staple the way the movie does. There are fine moments, but the highs don’t rise enough to offset the lows.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They have managed to recapture the magic that permeated their best material and made it so imminently replayable. This is a bold move that should be celebrated, and more importantly, it should be emulated.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 71 Critic Score
    Yes, The Ballad of Darren is Dad Rock. Fairly enjoyable Dad Rock, true, and still a record hundreds of bands can only dream of making, but one that would likely fall by the wayside if anyone else had made it. Is this bad? Not really, and if anything, it proves that Blur can transition gracefully into old age.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    While Clarke remains tethered to his sources, he still manages to flap his way toward the sun. In this version of the myth, his wings hold up, his father congratulates him, and the gods give him a brief yet sincere ovation.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    My Back Was a Bridge for You to Cross, in turn, shows Anohni pivoting between stunningly direct and entrancingly oblique manifestos. A listener is left voyeuristically spellbound, striving to reconcile what they’ve encountered with the life they’re currently living.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The resulting album is at once a hodgepodge of ideas and a collection that is bound together by vintage synth tones NV and Deradoorian’s desire to explore the possibilities of their collaboration. It’s an entirely unpredictable but indefinably enlivening listening experience.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Overall, I Don’t Know is a formidable leap forward for bdrmm and needs to be seen as one body of work that veers this way and that, but always with a purposeful forward motion.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    But The Greater Wings, for all its inevitable connotations, is not a downer. It’s a beautiful testament to life and to the people we love and that keep us going, physically and spiritually. It’s also a testament to moving forward with grace and strength, and rediscovering that longing to live.