Beats Per Minute's Scores

  • Music
For 1,435 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 Achtung Baby [Super Deluxe]
Lowest review score: 18 If Not Now, When?
Score distribution:
1435 music reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    MUNA is the best soundtrack one can find for the next few months. Seemingly destined to join the canon of pop’s great cult-classics (Carly Rae Jepsen’s Emotion, Robyn’s Body Talk, among them), it’s an album whose legacy should last much longer.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 61 Critic Score
    Some of it drags (looking at you, “You’ve Won This War”), and the lyrics, melodies, and sounds don’t always land. At times you can practically feel him straining for it all to Mean Something, but Butler remains a powerful and important voice in music, even when a particular album doesn’t fully succeed.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    It manages to take inspiration from a grab bag of styles and still create an unified, singular end-product. Earnest and unburdened, Time Bend is a staggeringly bold statement for a debut album. It would, indeed, seem as though we have not seen anything yet.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 69 Critic Score
    It’s a decent follow-up, but one that unfortunately comes off less Bartees Strange and more Bartees Safe.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is undoubtedly going to be a divisive one for long-term fans, with some holding it up as just as vital as anything else, while others will simply overlook it or just take a couple of highlights to add to their ‘Best of PG’ playlists. Whichever the case, whether you devour it or dismiss it, there’s no denying that it expands the mythos and majesty of Perfume Genius.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 68 Critic Score
    Like a lot of Andrew Bird albums of late, Inside Problems needs some time to reveal itself. Its frustrations and lidless graspings at the world are part of the game here, so that it doesn’t nestle quickly into a box on first listen feels appropriate.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    Not since Everything’s Fine has Quelle Chris sounded so surefire and determined. He wears beats with flair now, and lyrically he’s in top form, moving like a chameleon behind the mic and in front. Deathfame is easily the best solo outing for Chris so far.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Balancing stately pop ornamentation with more bombastically orchestrated moments, the album allows Meiburg to both indulge and scale back his dramaturgical impulses.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    It is arguably his most sonically interesting and personal project so far, but its inconsistency punches a few pot-holes in the listening journey. The experimentation here doesn’t always work, but when it does, it shows that Post is heading in some exciting directions for future albums.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    While her last proper album, 2019’s orchestrally-imbued All Mirrors, was something of a coming out party for her grand artistic ambition and scope, Big Time is the coming out party for her true personality. In order to do this, she’s stripped away the grandiosity and reverted back to the country and Americana sounds that she calls home.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    Overall, the album occurs as less incendiary than previous work (with the exception of the opening track), DBT at least temporarily setting aside their polemical blowtorches, instead mindfully venturing into vivid inventories of their own lives, choices, and karmic trajectories.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Each track on Nothing To Declare feels like a condensed, expertly-aimed Hadoken of fun, furious energy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    It’s fun, it’s furious, and just about anyone should be able to appreciate that.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    They’ve delivered a certain-to-be-beloved debut – one that separates itself from its peers.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The wicked atmosphere that they’ve crafted across Heart Under is worthy of celebration alone.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    At heart, it’s all too modest, too fatigued, too lacking in ambition and attitude.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    Post-punk bands tend to veer dark and brooding, but Dehd avoid that here, putting all of their energy into sunny anthems filled with dizzying coos, lighthearted hooks and charming rhythms. It all helps them bounce across the record and into our hearts for good.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    These are pretty songs, but largely forgettable when amassed together, and though EYEYE is an honorable attempt at switching lanes yet again after a divisive fourth album, it mostly comes up short as a finished product.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    Rentals is uniformly great, and each track boasts its share of both gorgeous instrumentation and lines that are alternately poetic and prosaic.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    It’s all put together under one roof in a neat, unassuming way, made refreshing and palatable by his persona.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It preserves the trio’s history while serving us a matured Moderat. MORE D4TA is their cathartic work of loneliness and intoxication, indulging in a museum of sounds.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    They’ve made the brave decision to remember what it’s like to feel and to breathe again, and it can all be heard in the stirring vibrations of Margolin’s words and voice.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With more questions raised than answered, Cain’s unusually ambitious and fully-realised debut somehow leaves listeners craving more in spite of its wonderful, exhausting, 75 minute runtime.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    Even in his lost moments, like “A Random Act of Kindness” where he repeats “Out of time, out of money”, he searches out the hope while faced with setbacks and sorrow. It’s in these moments that Morby shines as that everyman – a role he has been crafted into through those various influences he holds up so high.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    He’s willing to stumble, befuddle, and outright offend – it’s all part of its creator’s flawed self, which is all but stripped starkly naked in front of us. It’s far too complex, far too searching to be wrangled in a simple review. I know this much: we’ll be talking about this one for a long, long time.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    As moving as those songs are, The Smile are more intriguing when they shift slightly further away from Yorke and Greenwood’s established palette.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    After 11 tracks, this return feels well-earned, but it’s equally refreshing to know the next song we hear from Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever might not be so predictable.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Yeah, that’s a decent album. Flags towards the end, sure. Some rippers on there, though. Glad I stuck with it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Van Etten gives us what is, quite possibly, her strongest album yet. And that sense of breakthrough, of sheer lift, is prevalent right from the start. ... There’s a powerful sincerity and confidence to her vocals throughout the record, as she weaves and bobs around her deceptively simple and emotive melodies, often hitting notes that sounds for a millisecond like they won’t quite work, and then suddenly, they do, as on the final heavenly note of “Darkness Fades”.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 69 Critic Score
    WE
    It’s retreading old ground and shouting at clouds, but also genuine and at times beautiful in its crystalline synth-pop nostalgia.