Billboard.com's Scores

  • Music
For 825 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 81% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 16% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 The Complete Matrix Tapes [Box Set]
Lowest review score: 40 Jackie
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 825
825 music reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When Clarkson forges a real emotional connection--like on the raw, personal title track, another standout vocal showcase--the album transcends the hammier, more hackneyed moments in between.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With sterling wordplay and a consistent melancholy vibe, the Detroit native took all the tension, the highs and lows, and laid it out on wax, compiling the strongest project of his career.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On the impressive Sour Soul, the Canadian trio that built its profile through Odd Future and Gucci Mane covers bangs out rich blaxploitation-invoking live instrumentals, providing a perfect canvas for the Wu-Tang Clan vet's vivid rhymes about dodging police, jewelry and, oddly enough, yoga.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Whereas 2010's Born Free's presentation of a gentler, more ripened Rock occasionally came across as calculated, here the singer--who also produced most of this album--fits comfortably into a modern country-rock landscape that seems practically tailor-made for him: a God-fearing good old boy with a hard-rock heart and an outlaw-country spirit.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's big, bold and still stands out next to anything coming from Nashville.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Much like its forebear, the album's 12 tunes are tight, tidy pop-rockers, presented in her characteristic straightforward-yet-slightly-skewed manner.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Of the book, the flick, and the soundtrack, only the music really hits hard enough to leave a lasting mark.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If there's a funnier, stranger and more touchingly bizarre album released this year, it will be a very good year indeed.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Reflection represents a promising first step for a girl group that has long been awaiting stardom and has quickly established itself as a wrecking crew of positive role models.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Making the most of Capitol's Studio B--a Los Angeles landmark where Sinatra recorded--Dylan captures his band live, with stirring intimacy. As curator, he gets credit for avoiding obvious hits like "Stardust" and "Fly Me to the Moon," instead picking "Why Try to Change Me Now?" and the show-stopping closer, "That Lucky Old Sun," an old sufferer's plea for relief
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    American Middle Class is a focused collection of songs.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Her lyrics feel like they're whispered directly into the ear; her guitar playing (the only accompaniment aside from the occasional flute) is even more meticulous. But the true leap is in the set's many quietly arresting moments.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Part of the fun of The Lone Bellow is playing spot the influence: James Gang here, Staples Sisters there, Warren Zevon, Faces, lots of Crosby Stills Nash & Young. But to its credit, the band channels these icons with a commensurate amount of tact and respect.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For 2012's The Connection, the steroid-heavy production was somewhat tempered so emotional catharsis could propel the album, and the same holds true for new collection F.E.A.R. (Face Everything and Rise).
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The stripped-down songs on Terrible World--guitar-driven variations on God-fearing gospel ("Carolina Low") and Laurel Canyon country ("Lake Song")--are its best. After years of extravagance, dressing down turns out to be The Decemberists' strong suit.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On this adventurous LP, the critically lauded Scottish sextet waits until track nine, "Ever Had a Little Faith?," to offer one of its patented gently strummed character studies.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Panda Bear Meets the Grim Reaper, Lennox's fifth studio LP, is his most direct and accessible statement yet.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While it's too early to tell if The Pinkprint is a classic, it's safe to say it's her best album to date. Minaj was finally able to out-rap herself and purge issues she's struggled with in private in her most exposed fashion yet.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Perhaps more than any other young hitmaker, Charli has a sound that is distinctively her own, despite the murderers' row of producer-songwriters onboard.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While it's not the Clan in full, you'd be hard-pressed to find a better supporting cast. If Tomorrow is, in fact, the group's swan song, 36 Seasons proves that Wu's members can do just fine--and maybe even better--on their own.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its fifth album is another successful step toward the mainstream.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thanks to [Lorde's] vision, and her grip on the series' most important thematic elements, the 50 minutes of music behind Mockingjay Part 1 ably function as both a glance at 2014's finest purveyors of complex, downcast pop and a complement to the start of the series' chaotic, brutal conclusion.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Brooks doesn't do half measures, as evident on the title track, screeching guitar-rock in which he rails against technology by referencing folklore hero John Henry, who died in a steam drill competition against a machine. But it's the dramatic tunes about love gone bad that stand out.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album builds on the pair's impressive collaborative EP with Robyn, Do It Again, reinforcing that project's themes of legacy, repetition and dedication.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ["Louder Than Words" is] a riveting and beautiful piece of music, yes, but not quite a definitive statement. The same might be said of The Endless River as a whole.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The diversity and focus has paid off, as Cadillactica is K.R.I.T.'s best and most cohesive work to date.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The missteps are few, but grave: on "Gimme a Chance," she transitions from bouncy rap to full-blown salsa, complete with Spanish singing, while the retro surf-pop of the Ariel Pink-produced "Nude Beach a Go-Go" confounds. And yet, both merely amplify how creatively combative Banks can be--especially when she focuses that energy into her music.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a more consistent album than its predecessor. And perhaps more importantly, it shores up the duo's country flanks, and demonstrates that FGL intends to aggressively protect its progressive place in the genre, one that the act essentially designed on its own.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pain Killer is an in-your-face album with rock bombast, though there's enough occasional twang here to keep the country traditionalists happy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Coyne doesn't actually sing on the majority of these covers, but regardless, the album is decidedly refracted through a Flaming Lips light.