Billboard.com's Scores

  • Music
For 825 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 81% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 16% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 The Complete Matrix Tapes [Box Set]
Lowest review score: 40 Jackie
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 825
825 music reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    While the inclusion of faint funk ("Sole Brother") and hints of country twang ("Retard Canard") expands Born Ruffians' repertoire, the track "Blood, the Sun & Water" brings the most energy to the set.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A natural progression from 2008 release "Sleep Through the Static," the new set features more electric guitars and a brighter, full-band sound while still bringing plenty of singalong acoustic romanticism and breezy melodies.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    On her debut album, The Family Jewels, Diamandis backs up her bark with a promising bite.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Displaying impressive vocal polish from outspoken frontman Scott Weiland; blazing guitar solos over tight, crunch-laden instrumentation; and grungy takes on Lennon/McCartney melodicism, STP asserts its place among seminal hard-rock chameleons.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    Its new album, "Dirty Side Down," plays to all of Widespread Panic's strengths, from the intricate weaving of John Bell's and Jimmy Herring's guitars with John Hermann's keyboards to a stylistic sweep that spans from the epic, prog-like opening suite "Saint Ex" to breezier fare like the title track and the spritely gallop of "Clinic Cynic."
    • 84 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    LCD Soundsystem principal James Murphy is at his cynical best on the act's third album, This Is Happening.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Frontman Ben Bridwell's airy vocals and cozy lyrics have stayed consistent, but the impressive production work by the band and Phil Ek places the gorgeous melodies front and center without sacrificing Band of Horses' rustic power.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Entirely produced by the Black Keys (except for the Danger Mouse-helmed song "Tighten Up"), the pair's latest album, Brothers, lures with its spooky throwback sound, preternatural grooves and dark bluesy jams.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Children's gospel choirs and Joss Stone make somewhat unnecessary appearances, but musically the project impressively meets its goal of cultural connection.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even as his piecework band stretches the sound in unexpected directions, Lidell--like a peculiar cross of Prince and Otis Redding--remains confidently true to his soul vision, creating a tense musical discourse that wrings raw emotion from each eclectic track.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Manipulating her voice as much as she does her sound, Monáe widens the cast of characters and pushes along the self-explorative narrative. The ArchAndroid could be the stuff of stage or screen, 3-D without the annoying glasses.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Everything but the Girl fans might miss the duo's dancey leanings, but Thorn proves that her voice is enough to transcend genre preferences.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    There are some moments when the mood lightens, usually for romantic fare like the funky Estelle-assisted song "Midnight Hour." But these tracks display neither Kweli's lyrical precision nor Hi-Tek's adventurous sounds. The set also falls short of its opening promise to engineer a "shift in the paradigm of hip-hop."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Sea of Cowards is even wilder, with grungier guitars ("I'm Mad," "No Horse"), greasier synths ("The Difference Between Us," "Gasoline") and funkier neo-John Bonham beats from White himself ("Jawbreaker," "Old Mary").
    • 85 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    High Violet synthesizes the best parts of the National's past into a fantastic present
    • 75 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    The Toronto-based collective goes all out on its third album, Latin, which features lead members Brian Borcherdt and Graham Walsh's spacey keyboards and effects supplemented by the powerful live drums and bass of their touring personnel.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    While old-school rap nods and blunt lyricism add to the set's allure, its fluidity suffers.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    Full of contradictions, the album is primitive and ultra-modern, dark and enchanting, tranquil and energetic.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Although Francis has described himself as a "low-confidence engine" since early in his career, the rapper has produced a strong and instantly relatable album with Li(f)e.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Stuck on Nothing works well as a no-nonsense party album, but Free Energy shows tremendous promise on this debut.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    The departure earlier this year of keyboardist Franz Nicolay means less Springsteen-like keyboard embellishments, but the group's Everyman quality remains intact thanks to vocalist/guitarist Craig Finn's straightforward lyricism and lead guitarist Tad Kubler's signature swells.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    The track "Water in Hell" is an anthemic rocker with a catchy, shout-along chorus ("From what I can tell/There's water in hell!"), and "Forced to Love" combines the band's usual grit and a hook that unexpectedly sticks, similar to "Cause = Time" from its 2002 breakthrough release, "You Forgot It in People." Strangely enough, the new album's less pop-driven songs are hit or miss.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Cosmogramma may evade complete comprehension, but Flying Lotus' foreign and colorful arrangements entice even the most casual listener.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    The fresher feel on the Vancouver group's new set could partially be attributed to frontman Carl Newman's openness to collaborating with his peers.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    The set is full of the Deftones' usual energy and showcases singer Chino Moreno's knack for alternating between screams and sweet vocal delivery over heavy, complex guitar work.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    With erotic themes, smooth production and the use of a Japanese Omnichord synthesizer, the band's fourth album, OMNI, proves that there's still plenty to explore.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Robison and Maguire prove capable of crafting galloping, catchy choruses for such songs as "The Coast," "Ain't No Son," "It Didn't Make a Sound" and "I Miss You."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 69 Critic Score
    When Braxton isn't sulking about heartbreak, she's enjoying being a woman.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While "The Oracle" is certainly familiar, it still sounds fresh enough and well worth the wait for fans who prefer their Godsmack served up straight.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    Nobody's Daughter recalls the highlights of the band's critically acclaimed 1994 album, "Live Through This," and shows that, as a band, Hole is not one bit damaged.