Boston Globe's Scores

For 7,177 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Long Day Closes
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede II (Full Sequence)
Score distribution:
7177 movie reviews
  1. Profile is one big gimmick, but the gimmickiness, you might say, is that in a very real sense it’s shot entirely on location. Is it a great movie? No, but it’s something rare in any medium, film or otherwise: a work in which form really is content.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s solid, well-acted, thought-provoking fare, if rarely rising to the level of inspired.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Even the gunplay, of which there is plenty, feels secondhand.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Gunda ― which doubles as the name of the movie and the name of the pig ― is as close as we may ever come to experiencing the world as animals do, specifically the animals that become our food.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The producers include Phil Lord and Chris Miller, the inspired duo behind The Lego Movie and Spider-Man: Into the Spider-verse, and The Mitchells vs. the Machines has the same breakneck gift for comic timing and a willingness to throw anything at the screen if it’ll get a laugh, including an angry Furby the size of an office tower.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Writer-director Casimir Nozkowski has great fun coming up with new exasperations for his main character, and Henry has a slow burn to rival old-time masters like Edgar Kennedy.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film has an epic sense of devastated wonder that can only come from standing as far back from the parade as one possibly can while still holding on to one’s empathy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One nice thing about Mila Kunis’s portrayal of a heroin addict in Rodrigo García’s Four Good Days is that the vanity’s up front, in the character and in the star’s nervy embrace of a woman who has become human wreckage.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Hardcore fans and gamers will thrill to the contractually required scene where a fighter has his still-beating heart ripped out of his chest. But that’s the only time Mortal Kombat shows a pulse.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Writer-director Sødahl expertly balances the sentimental and the acerbic, the grave and the altar. But Hope lives or dies on its central performances, and they are perfectly realized.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Together Together sounds like a really bad idea on paper, and for the first half-hour or so, it’s a really bad idea on screen. Yet a funny thing happens to this surrogate-pregnancy romantic comedy (I told you it was a bad idea) as it bumps along: It develops curious and unexpected pockets of feeling.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Believability takes a back seat here, obviously, and the special effects are so over-the-top bloody as to be more comical than scary; unlike In the Earth, a much slicker British horror film opening in theaters this week, Jakob’s Wife proudly embraces its inherent B-ness. But it’s the star who makes this a low-down hoot while rooting it in some tart and deserved observations about the battle of the sexes.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    We’ve been here before and many, many times, and Monday, newly available on demand, doesn’t give us enough reason to be here again.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Like Field, the new movie has a sneakily dark sense of humor, a taste for the odd bit of gore, and a love of psychedelic mushrooms and cinematic hallucinations.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Voyagers shows that Burger can still move a story along with craft, pace, and skill, even if that story is, in the end, awfully predictable.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie, a balm for the senses and the soul, celebrates and discreetly mourns an activity that stretches back to antiquity and is slowly being snuffed out by global market forces.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    From its title on down to the rugelach, Shiva Baby is an instant classic in the Jewish comedy of mortification, a genre that combines hilarity, anxiety, resentment and schmaltz.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film is a shrine to a hardy subculture, its people, and the animals they love. Long may they run.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    French Exit allows Pfeiffer free rein to play, and her performance is glorious in a major key of scornful hauteur and a minor key of self-pity.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Godzilla vs. Kong has speed, wit, and a refreshing refusal to take itself very seriously.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Human Voice is a banquet disguised as a light lunch, heady with flavors; you come away blissfully sated and hungry for more.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s a shame: Odenkirk begins the movie with a rep as a smart and slippery performer, but by the end of Nobody, he could be anybody.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Tina is celebratory and glossy, with no mention of her recent health issues, her son’s 2018 suicide, or other painful subjects. The life is still more than eventful enough.
  2. Assured and well made (Dominic Cooke directed), The Courier offers bits of tradecraft — Penkovsky photographing documents with a miniature camera, a special tie clip used as identity-establishing bona fide — and a high-stakes extraction plan gets put in motion. But it’s less about what gets done than the persons doing it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Is all the sound and fury worthwhile, the four years of championing, the four hours up on the screen? To the fans who’ve been in it for the long haul, of course. To HBO Max executives, you bet. To casual moviegoers, probably not.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Quo Vadis, Aida? has the narrative beats and the intensity of a classic thriller: a cornered protagonist, an implacable villain, a breathless pace, hair’s-breadth escapes.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As Anthony, a blustery London widower whose grip on reality slowly comes unglued over the course of the film, Hopkins does it again. This is a magnificent and harrowing performance: A lion in winter slowly coming to ground.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Inheritance is a welcome reminder of film’s flexibility as a medium of protest, a vessel of cultural history, and an agent of change.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Cherry is three movies in one, none of them fresh, all of them overlong.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    True to its title, Moxie has a lot of moxie, and it’s an easy watch, smartly acted by a crew of young talents.

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