British GQ's Scores

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Average Game review score: 0
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46 game reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    For all its many quirks and oddities, there's a good chance you'll end up admiring Gran Turismo 7's steadfast idealism. Couple the quality of the driving experience – both mechanically and visually – with the sheer quantity of lovingly crafted stuff packed into this game, and you have the series’ finest entry since 2001’s Gran Turismo 3 way back on the PlayStation 2. Simply put: no other driving game feels as good as this one. If you don't love cars just yet, then this GT7 will do its damndest to make you a convert.
    • 88 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    It’s clear that Horizon Forbidden West considers itself more than just an action adventure game with cool weapons, robots and climbing, though. So much of it feels great to play. So much of its world is a joy to inhabit. So many of its quests deliver more than just open world fluff, but Aloy’s uninspired arc could’ve been more. This is a significantly more complete sequel, and we’ll almost certainly see a third entry. If Guerilla can nail Aloy’s journey, her legend as a truly iconic character is all but guaranteed.
    • 87 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    The important core essentials have been nailed, though. After six years, 343 Industries could not afford another miss and with Infinite it has built some incredibly strong foundations for whatever comes next. The team clearly now understands what this series is – the shooting, the flow of combat and movement, the character of Master Chief and his closest companions, and a totally new structure to catalyse some monumental silliness. It recaptures the old, adds the new, and we now can’t wait for the future.
    • 92 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Ultimately, Horizon 5 doesn’t really care how you play provided you’re having a good time; the fact that you can race any event in any car should be evidence enough of that. And it delivers you enough cars and event variety that you’re never really agonising over minor incidental perks. There’s as much fun to be had driving a LaFerrari here as a Mercedes A-Class, or a shitty little jeep. It’s about sunshine and sights and sounds and freedom. Don Draper once mused that happiness is a moment before you need more happiness. Horizon 5 is constantly delivering those addictive micro-doses and it’s why I never want to leave.
    • 80 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Chiefly, it’s the writing and characterisation that makes Guardians more or less work. It delivered laughs, surprising moments of pathos and has some unpredictable twists that caught me totally off-guard, including a dog that shows up when you least expect it in the most hilarious way. Unfortunately these moments usually arrive when you’re not pushing buttons on the controller, having control wrenched away and to show you a gorgeous MCU-inspired cut scene. If emotional beats and smart storytelling are what you’re looking for, come right in. But the game is pretty rote, and, at that point, you wonder if this should have been on Disney+ and not your PS5.
    • 88 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    And that’s where Dread absolutely thrives: simple, focused ideas that are brilliantly executed. It’s smooth and satisfying in the hands, lean and exciting throughout the entire adventure and mixes its old school roots with fresh ideas that keep it ahead of the curve its forebears drew in the first place. That mix of new and old is a lot to balance in a game – let alone a portable one – but Dread makes it look easy. It’s both Nintendo’s best first-party game of the year and the perfect companion to a Switch OLED, should you be picking one up for launch day.
    • 73 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Don’t get me wrong: there is a time and a place for a game like Far Cry 6. There were brief stretches of time I began to sink more willingly into its simple brand of mindless monotony. But there are just too few examples of the game’s mechanics coalescing to deliver memorable, crazy, unpredictable action. With so little dynamism in the world’s AI and its systems, missions aren’t just identically structured, they’re fundamentally limited in potential outcomes. And in a world this enormous, with characters that are this intent on destroying the status quo, it ends up feeling like wasted space. If only overthrowing an evil tyrant was as simple as amassing a hundred collectibles. Viva la repetición.
    • 88 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Deathloop is a rare game, ripped straight from Arkane’s rulebook, infused so deeply with its DNA, but still something entirely its own, separate to what the studio has made before. It feels like big-budget production and indie ideas merged together and I hope it gives Arkane the mainstream break it deserves.
    • 87 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Expect a video game, warts and all, but one that, when boiled down to its core aim of lethal, bloody combat, fully understands the joy of making every button press feel deadly.
    • 76 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    But those A-listers simply can’t offset the core frustrations. I wanted to know more, was desperate to progress and its story had its hooks into me, but the harsh time restrictions made Twelve Minutes often feel like a chore. If you can stick with it then its story is weird, violent and, at times, pretty shocking, but this is a game I think perfectly sums up how a time loop would actually feel: annoying, frustrating, pressurised, claustrophobic. As a game, it’s just not as entertaining or – ironically – as time conscious as it needs to be to succeed. In the best time-loop games, you have the freedom to experiment with one thing before trying another. Offsetting the repetition is easier. In Twelve Minutes, stuck in those same four walls, those same dozen minutes can feel like as many hours.
    • 88 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Rift Apart’s greatest weakness is that it never truly utilises the brilliance of its dimension-shifting rift mechanics. You see a glimpse of the full potential at the start of the game, but then it sort of… disappears a little. You hop from planet to planet having a lot of fun, but there isn’t the shifting world design that you might expect to continue from its fabulously inventive introduction. This is still a big, beautiful, bombastic adventure with action, humour and heart aplenty, not to mention impeccable looks and craft that take full advantage of PS5. It is a game you should definitively play, but for all its flash and colour Rift Apart does – just occasionally – settle for the one dimension. Thankfully, it’s one you want to visit.
    • 84 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    There is no doubt that Village is a great Resi entry, with more variety and sheer bombast than its predecessor ever delivered. In prizing its many made-for-Twitch-and-YouTube moments over tone and consistency, it falls short as an evolution of the franchise. Village is still a bold, silly and beautiful thing, but there’s no avoiding a murkier focus and a less compelling story resulting is a slightly mish-mashed “Best Of”. One that’s easy to love when you’re caught between its vicious gothic claws and a little forgettable once they’ve relinquished themselves.
    • 86 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    The result is a game that has everything I wanted to love, but when the stakes are this high, unfair design is unforgivable. No doubt some PS5 owners will love the gauntlet that Returnal offers – the satisfaction of progress, when it all clicks together, can be excellent. But it’s not a game that respects your time. So I’ll just go back and play Hades instead – a game made retroactively even better now that its greatest strengths have been laid bare by Returnal's shortcomings.
    • 87 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Although Hitman 3 on its own is great and worth your time, it’s the promise of all three games in one that make this a contender for Game Of The Year. In the end, the last five years have seen IO seemingly in training for what might come next. As it prepares to leave Agent 47 behind, we know now it has another iconic agent in its hands: James Bond. This feels like the ultimate send-off and a job interview at the same time. Double-0 status approved.
    • 86 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    An open-world masterpiece that's its own worst enemy at times, Cyberpunk 2077 still ranks as a modern-day classic...With more than 40 hours clocked over the last week – walking, driving, shooting, hacking and talking my way around Night City – it is my favourite game of the year and the best I've played since 2018's Red Dead Redemption 2.
    • 80 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Despite these various issues, which I’m presuming (and hoping) will be fixed with a patch, Valhalla is a game I want to explore every single inch of and that’s something I didn’t entirely expect. It’s funny, sprawling but focused, varied but consistent and it’s probably the best Assassin’s Creed game to date. Even if I’ll need another lockdown to finish it...
    • 70 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    I hope we see a sequel. A bolder direction like this deserves recognition versus the many carbon copies of other games, even in Ubisoft's own roster of franchises. With a bit more bite, a follow-up could be – as we say in London – the dog’s bollocks.
    • 72 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    I hope we see a sequel. A bolder direction like this deserves recognition versus the many carbon copies of other games, even in Ubisoft's own roster of franchises. With a bit more bite, a follow-up could be – as we say in London – the dog’s bollocks.
    • 83 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Look past its old-timey foibles and Ghost Of Tsushima absolutely has its merits. It’s the prettiest seven-out-of-ten we’ve ever played, with a world that begs to be seen and explored, despite never providing the reasons to make that exploration and time feel entirely rewarded. While the technical and artistic achievements on show here are undoubtedly high notes for the end of the PS4’s life, the mechanical underpinnings that bring this world’s missions and story to life could’ve been lifted wholesale from generations past.
    • 86 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Combine all this with a new split-screen mode for a nostalgic hit of couch-multiplayer or the throwbacks to previous classic cars and F1 2020 is undoubtedly the most feature-complete Codemasters lap to date.
    • 93 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    So as the credits roll on my second playthrough I consider going back for a third, because this wonderful story does feels so good to play. It’s a game that’s never held down by the weight of its predecessor’s importance. Its writing and its performances feel pitch-perfect throughout, driven by the fact no movie or book or soon-to-follow HBO TV show could properly replicate the story it tells. It’s a video game and it could only exist as such. Now, just be sure you see it through to its incredible end.
    • 93 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Half-Life: Alyx is nothing short of mesmerising...This is real innovation. Just put on the headset and see for yourself.
    • 88 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    This is still ostensibly just an arcade shooter from the 1990s with some beautiful graphics layered on top, but the way Eternal finds a balance between intelligent design and utter chaos is near flawless.
    • 90 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    It’s weird to say that New Horizons doesn’t feel like a game at all. It’s more of a service – an essential. Yes, it’s fundamentally not that exciting when you think for more than a few moments about picking fruit or snagging bugs; yet it’s the kind of thing you just expect to have included with every Nintendo Switch. Because once you’ve played it you sort of can’t imagine not playing it. You’ll struggle to imagine a morning, or evening, or afternoon when you haven’t felt that persistent pull to escape to a better place. And a game like that has never come at a better time.
    • 79 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Despite a promising premise, Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order fails to meet the ever-high expectations of Star Wars games – and it even feels unfinished, as if rushed to market ahead of next month’s new film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    I am so glad Death Stranding exists. It’s serenely beautiful and conceptually fascinating, while also being frequently tedious and at worst, completely laborious...An experience of visual wonder and quite incredible ideas; an impossible elevator pitch, somehow brought to fruition; something that you have to experience for yourself, just to see if you like it. All brought down by the underpinnings of a game isn’t refined enough in its core mechanics or coherent enough in its narrative delivery to justify the hubristic run-time.
    • 80 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    So yes, I spent the majority of my weekend just downloading the game. And no, I don’t think that’s anything close to excusable for any release, let alone such a mainstream, big-budget game. But Modern Warfare’s slower, more deliberate pace leads to an experience that feels very different to and more intense than the slew of recent Call Of Duty iterations. Just be prepared to spend a long time staring at a download bar.
    • 86 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    These fights are where the game’s most obvious issue – its controls – also rears its head every now and then. Those controls are much, much better than they were on 3DS, but still remain a bit tricky when playing portably. However, despite a few niggling frustrations when fighting key bosses, they never really tarnish what is a wonderful slapstick delight housed in Nintendo’s most exquisitely detailed location in years.
    • 87 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    It’s a beautiful retread, capturing the toy-town essence of one of Link’s most obscure and off-the-wall adventures in his history.
    • 78 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Borderlands 3’s script is stuck somewhere in the past, a place we’d rather not revisit, and it makes no apologies for it. I sort of admire it for that, but I think that’s only because the rest of the game makes up for its loudmouthed pitfalls, and because I can – unlike that annoying friend who thinks they’re funny – turn its volume down when it all gets a bit much.

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