Checkpoint Gaming's Scores

  • Games
For 402 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 11% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 The Artful Escape
Lowest review score: 20 Lust from Beyond
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 18 out of 402
404 game reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    An intense atmospheric adventure with an intriguing premise, The Callisto Protocol delivers a solid horror game that focuses largely on its satisfying combat. It doesn't have much variety and is lacking a bit of creativity, but it makes up for that with impressive visuals and disgusting, intimidating monsters. It might not meet the expectations of its obvious inspirations, but The Callisto Protocol lays a strong foundation of terrifying atmosphere and crunchy combat that makes it satisfying and spooky nonetheless.
    • 75 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    If you are a fan of horde-like games then Warhammer 40,000: Darktide will no doubt scratch that itch. Whilst the gameplay can become repetitive and the grind seems to offer little value at this stage, I cannot deny that I had a blast playing it with a group of friends. Some incredible “oh crap” moments occurred during combat when we were overrun by a horde of enemies and had to work together to stay alive. It’s moments like these that keep you coming back for more. As this is a games-as-a-service title, we expect many more improvements and features to be added with time to enhance the experience and features. [Review in Progress]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Marvel's Midnight Suns is a fantastic tactical adventure that adds much-needed depth to the superhero genre. Taking advantage of deeper-cut characters and lore, a heartfelt and sweeping story is told, even finding a way to make an entirely new character fit into the fray. Accompanying that are engaging and curious mysteries to find around the Abbey grounds and a nice feeling of found family among friends. Losing track of time as I had talks with my favourite superhumans, doing whatever menial task at hand too was a particular highlight. Even in these moments of charming oddities, characterisation is stellar. Rounding it all off is another superb tactical experience from Firaxis Games, this time going all in on approachability and options to dominate the battlefield in your own personal ways. This is one of the best tactical games of the year. Marvel as a franchise still has some fight in it yet, and I can't wait to have more experiences like this from them in the future.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    I really wanted to like Soccer Story more than I did by the end. Its quirky, soccer-filled dialogue and setting is really charming, and I had a blast kicking my soccer ball everywhere to uncover secrets. However, in trying to craft a puzzle-RPG and soccer game hybrid, Soccer Story doesn’t really succeed in either side of that equation. Zelda fans will probably be turned off by the reliance on fetch quests and simplistic puzzles. Soccer Story’s lack of intricate team management or diverse match types probably won’t appeal much to soccer game aficionados either. Soccer Story is a decent enough experience, however it is held back by the lack of a strong gameplay foundation and annoying technical issues, which may at least be ironed out in the future.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Police Simulator: Patrol Officers is a game that should not have been made. It provides a core gameplay experience that is neither realistic enough to be a simulation nor interesting enough to be an actual game. At the same time, it unironically tries to cater to a fantasy that positions everyday people as enemies to be dealt with. Shamelessly borrowing the trappings of the Grand Theft Auto series without any of the satirical overtones leads to an unsettlingly pro-violence experience. It is even difficult to enjoy the game’s impressive environmental design thanks to a litany of visual glitches. Police Simulator: Patrol Officers misses the mark in almost every regard.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Evil West’s gameplay focuses around progression. It loves to introduce new elements like weapons, combat and enemies and then proceed to absolutely smash the player with an assortment of everything they have learnt by the end of each chapter. The constant change in how you play the game is overall satisfying, but its rinse and repeat formula of enemies and mini bosses became annoying the more time I spent with it. The location art and narrative is exciting, but I longed to be given more opportunities to explore and be rewarded for my endeavours based on the enticing nature of each area. Evil West is an exciting ride that will test your reflexes and ability to take on swarms of monsters which will either leave you feeling exhilarated, frustrated or like me, somewhere in between.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Pokémon Scarlet & Violet represents the power struggle between innovation and execution. There’s so much promise in the idea of a fully integrated, cooperative Pokémon game, yet the final product I experienced with Pokémon Violet falls short of those aspirations. There’s still a lovable structure found within the game, driven by a more immersive world design and a new generation of adorable mons. Though the polish is lacking, failing to completely realise the ideas put in place and falling short of expectations.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Pokémon Scarlet & Violet represents the power struggle between innovation and execution. There’s so much promise in the idea of a fully integrated, cooperative Pokémon game, yet the final product I experienced with Pokémon Violet falls short of those aspirations. There’s still a lovable structure found within the game, driven by a more immersive world design and a new generation of adorable mons. Though the polish is lacking, failing to completely realise the ideas put in place and falling short of expectations.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Gungrave G.O.R.E is overall a bit of a misfire, and evidence that some franchises should stay in the early 2000s. The game is a spectacle action game that has failed to learn anything meaningful from 20 years of game design evolution, from the importance of having an interesting or charismatic lead to gameplay which gives the player options and which evolves over time. The levels show a strong disposition towards dark and grey, and the plot won’t do much to engage you either. If you’re a diehard Gungrave fan who has been longingly awaiting the franchise’s revival, there might be something for you here; for anyone else, there are far better offerings out there.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All in all, Goat Simulator 3 is a wonderfully wacky experience that is sure to delight, whether you’re playing on your own or with friends. Its gameplay mechanics may get a bit old if you’re playing solo or looking for a layered gameplay story, but if you’re keen for a ridiculous and hilarious casual game to dip in and out of occasionally, Goat Simulator 3 will be an excellent fit for your library.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Harvestella is a game with a very addictive loop. With each dungeon leading you to a new plot revelation, and each season giving you new crops to grow it’s like the game is begging for “just one more day” and it can be hard to say no. While I wish that there was more depth to the characters, especially in the voice acting department, and the game doesn’t make any major strides, it is still a decently fresh take on the genre. It is important to know that Harvestella really is a JRPG before it is a farming sim; even though farming is a lot of fun, it is not the main thing you will be doing. Even though both farming and combat are simple, the combination of both manages to make Harvestella feel deeper than it actually is. So if you are on the lookout for a new RPG farming adventure to play after finishing Rune Factory 5, this might be it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Dark Pictures Anthology: The Devil in Me is the best game in the series yet. Featuring a solid cast and dynamics to boot, I was well engaged in wanting to ensure everyone made it out of the horrific Murder Castle alive and was genuinely devastated when some didn’t. More opportunities are provided to explore and pick apart the environment than ever, often unearthing genuinely intriguing readables. Technical shortcomings once again rear their head a bit, showing stiff character animations from time to time and varied visual fidelity in some character models. Some of the equipment you’ll use to poke about the hell you’ve found yourself in is inconsequential but when they work they really work. At the end of the day, these flaws are forgivable. With obstructive shifting walls and deadly traps waiting around every corner so that you’re never really sure when you’re safe or not, The Devil in Me is a very alluring setting for horror fans.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Somerville relies on its fantastic animations and settings to tell a story of a father trying to reunite with his family. But without important story fundamentals such as exposition, you have no idea what is going on. Coupled with the fact that the adventure consists of simply solving puzzles while walking around, it is hard to immerse yourself in the story or even care about what will happen. Solving puzzles can also be difficult because you are expected to fumble around and discover what can be interacted with. There’s no guidance or assistance, which leads to frustration when you have no idea what to do next. There’s a good attempt at telling a story here, but it’s difficult to find yourself wanting to reach the end.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 35 Critic Score
    Horse Tales: Emerald Valley Ranch is a sad tale for the much-needed resurgence of equestrian-focused video games. Littered with poor design choices and endless amounts of bugs, every attempt to seep some joy out of the game was hindered. This comes as a shame. The bones of a good game are in there from the exploration of an interconnected world to a good start in both horse gameplay and town management and restoration. Boiling down to more than just a game released too early, Horse Tales also is a game too ambitious for its own good and not what was expected or needed. Take this one out to the pasture, they’re done.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Pentiment is a remarkable achievement in storytelling. If I were to play again and make different choices I’m sure I would discover new dimensions to these characters I’ve come to know very well. Thanks to the game’s aesthetics, its meticulously researched writing, and the pedigree of its development team, the story of Andreas Maler is well worth experiencing. The game gracefully balances serious themes, soap operatic twists, and some very funny moments, revolving around a large cast of diverse, complex characters. Obsidian may have taken a risk making a game so unlike anything else they’ve made before, but the gamble has well and truly paid off. It’s not just a game for lit nerds.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Modern Warfare II is exactly what it says on the tin, but this time around it’s a different mixture inside said tin. While the game could be accused of continuing series tradition, I believe this game out of all the most recent Call of Duty titles is the most honest of its inspirations and its intention. This is the Call of Duty that tries and succeeds to recapture the spark that lit the gargantuan fire that is the Call of Duty franchise we know today. The original Modern Warfare trilogy started an empire. MW2 has ensured that its fall won’t happen for a good while longer, thanks to unparalleled multiplayer action and pure campaign spectacle. While there is always room for improvement and a desire from some sections of the fanbase to try something completely different; Modern Warefare II proves itself to be a spiritual sequel and a rebirth for the series moving forward into this new and exciting console generation.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While it may not appear as glamorous as Scientology, Honey, I Joined a Cult is deceptively addictive. Its alluring capacity to let you micro-manage down to the tiniest detail, its swathe of customisable components, and its cheeky writing will leave you obsessed and indoctrinated (if only for a few hours). It takes a fair amount of grinding to build up a cult worth following, but those with the patience to stick around will find a decent amount of management-sim goodness to worship here.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Tactics Ogre: Reborn is a very good remaster of an absolute classic. So many lines in-game are raw and palpable and feel like utter poetry, leaving me perplexed at how they could be written by another human. Re-recorded tracks add to the grim but boisterous realities of the universe’s war. Plenty of granular investment and min-maxing is on offer to create a timeless and incredibly realised tactical combat experience. However, I can’t help but sometimes want more from its vague storytelling and opportunities for more quality-of-life improvements. Concessions absolutely could’ve been made for more difficulty and saving options, doing away with the feeling of hitting roadblocks. Still, this is a genre experience that’s as true as they come. Tactics Ogre has once more cemented itself as one of the tactics giants, and a bloody momentous one at that.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    The Chant storms out of the gates with a kooky but intriguing concept of cosmic-horror, but simply isn’t able to live up to its own ambitions. It has some good ideas if you look hard enough, but the clunky combat, milquetoast puzzle solving and forgettable story firmly plant this one in the category of B-Grade horror, which, to be fair, is definitely the vibe the developers seem to have gone for. Even with a few good foundational ideas with the use of prisms and a couple of cool boss fights helping The Chant slightly redeem itself, the biggest misfire is that it’s just not that scary, and without that, this cosmic-horror is just a cosmic-snooze.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A Little to the Left is a fun puzzle game for all ages. The depth and variety of puzzle is good to see, with extra replayability allowing certain puzzles to shine. A daily puzzle delivered to each player provides a unique touch. While the game is great, there aren’t a lot of accessibility options such as a colour-blind mode or arachnophobia filter. However, the nature of the game is still easily approachable with beautifully stylised art and music bringing great pleasure. A Little to the Left is pure wholesome and cozy fun.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Sonic Frontiers was definitely a risk, but SEGA and Sonic Team are no strangers to rolling the dice and operating on pure ambition. If we are honest with ourselves, for too long, Sonic has come up short on the execution. But this time the iconic speedster has truly delivered. Open world games might be a dime a dozen, and they have not reinvented the wheel here. Instead, they've successfully transported Sonic to an intriguing new world that is a pleasure to explore, while maintaining some retro flare and an engaging story that will make fans happy. Put simply, Sonic Frontiers is the best 3D Sonic game ever made, and a fantastic step in the right direction that bodes very well for the future of everybody's favourite blue hedgehog.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Yomawari: Lost in the Dark is perfect for amateur-level horror players wanting to dip their feet into a game scarier than what they’re used to. The dim lighting, disfigured monsters, stealth mechanics, and creepy atmosphere—all wrapped up in a beautiful (but really terrifying) 2D world—will be all the training you need to take on even scarier games. And if horror doesn’t phase you, then the well-crafted and deeply folkloric setting will reel you in. Be warned though, the final act is both monotonous and disappointing.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    God of War Ragnarök is more of the epic God of War that we loved in 2018, but it builds on those foundations in every single way to create a compelling and addicting adventure in its own right that improves across the board. Combat is furious and intense, exploring every nook and cranny of each Norse realm is captivating, and clever puzzles are seamlessly intertwined with abilities that change, evolve, and make you feel like a master of all crafts. Narratively, the heartfelt and fascinating story is supported by incredible writing that makes its whole cast of characters shine, and the production values are through the roof, with a gorgeous soundtrack and visuals that push the limits and stun at every turn. Santa Monica Studios have again managed to create something truly memorable and entirely special.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Star Ocean: The Divine Force will likely win back fans unimpressed with Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness. With its fun cast and expansive narrative, I found the game easy to get invested in, despite the predictably tropey JRPG melodrama. The mobility upgrades and combat overhauls make it the most fun Star Ocean game I have played yet. It’s a shame that the awkward character models, ridiculously small text size and sluggish level up mechanics may prove a roadblock for some. If you’re not already a Star Ocean or JRPG fan, Star Ocean: The Divine Force might not be that easy to get into. However, if you are willing to overlook some of its shortcomings, and want a fantasy action-RPG with a sci-fi twist, it is worth checking out.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    DRAGON BALL: The Breakers is a good idea held back by Pay-to-Win practices and outdated design decisions. While the game could have a bright future ahead of it, it has a long way to go before it can be considered a truly great title, and really ought to sort out it’s current issues before the developers look ahead to Seasons 2 and beyond. The fundamentals are there, and the gameplay is solid; if these can be polished and modernised, then Breakers would easily go from a niche oddity to a raging blast.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Overall, The Valiant offers an engaging strategy experience that, while not offering anything ground-breaking, will keep RTS fans entertained. While the single-player campaign is presented in a traditional run-of-the-mill format, its multiplayer modes are sure to delight both old and new strategy fans. For that reason alone, the game is worth picking up.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Frog Detective 3: Corruption at Cowboy County is a sweet ending to the investigative series. Playable by all audiences, it’s a clever, humourous experience that plays with and parodies the adventure genre tropes incredibly well. Plenty of whimsical characters and interactions await thanks to the writing chops provided. This is further exemplified by true mood-setting in the colourful environments and masterful music work from Dan Golding. The final reveal may be a little predictable, but who cares? The series’ final chapter is closed ever so intricately and they even managed to add a ridable scooter. Farewell Frog Detective. I’ll miss you.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    SIGNALIS never stops feeding you a truly terrifying experience. Something could scare you around every corner, and there’s nothing you can do to push that feeling away permanently. Enemies are constantly on the prowl for you and will show up when you least expect it. Loud sounds are rare but pierce through the normally quiet setting. There’s a non-stop source of terror and it creates a fantastic horror experience. SIGNALIS’ story isn’t the strongest, and it could have benefited from investigating characters more often. Although despite the narrative shortcomings, SIGNALIS presents a horror experience you won’t soon forget.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The voxel creations and freedom that Dual Universe offers are pretty impressive. It’s a concept with a lot of potential. However, the failed execution and many bugs leave this game dead on arrival with honestly no reason to play unless it ever receives a resurgence in players and a massive gameplay overhaul.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    The Last Oricru is a fun storytelling experience told through the eyes of the Souls-like genre. It’s great to see everyone working for their own ends, and not being able to identify who is good and bad from the start. Focusing purely on what you think is most advantageous creates a story that fits your own personality well. But everything else is a regular Souls-like experience from top to bottom. There are attempts to stand out, but other than the story, they don’t have the impact that really leaves a positive impression in a player’s mind. The Last Oricru takes some risks, some of which pay off and some that don’t. It’s perfect for those who like their Souls-like games to have a good story, but if you’re not a fan of the genre, you’re better off staying away.

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