Checkpoint Gaming's Scores

  • Games
For 195 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 The Artful Escape
Lowest review score: 20 Lust from Beyond
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 87 out of 195
  2. Negative: 8 out of 195
196 game reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A fun little party puzzler, Big Brain Academy: Brain vs. Brain gives the ol’ neurons a thorough workout in a jolly, well-presented package. While its single-player mode lacks longevity and will only keep the most dedicated brainiacs engaged, the sheer maddening joy of trying to compete in its frantic multiplayer offering is delightful and sure to keep your grey matter nice and juicy. Between its smooth touchscreen controls, charming presentation, and customisable difficulty options, Big Brain Academy provides a solid party experience for the whole family.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Master Chief is back and better than ever. Halo Infinite introduces open-world elements that don’t distract from the main story and add value to its replayability and memorable action. Even with the inclusion of the thrilling Grappleshot, the gameplay still maintains its signature feel. Multiplayer may need a lot of finetuning, but it costs nothing to play and provides plenty of frantic fun for a group of friends and solo players. With more features and additions to come, Halo Infinite isn’t slowing down… No. I think we’re just getting started.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    What was once the pinnacle of its genre has become a bit of a joke as it releases again and again and again. The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Anniversary Edition adds very little that can’t be found in the 2016 Special Edition or is already free with Creation Club content. There is enjoyment to be had out of playing the game in the new survival mode and I still adore the base game. However, Skyrim just isn’t as strong when held up to modern standards, and it is the fault of Bethesda that this tired horse is now running a race with so many others that are leagues faster.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Farming Simulator 22 is a beefy farming game that brings realism at the expense of inexperienced player enjoyment. It’s a machine built on the agricultural industry that forgoes any story in favour of hard work. It’s a simulator game that understands the assignment but isn’t at all intuitive in how it allows players to begin new farms. With proper tutorials and allowances, this game would appeal to players beyond its dedicated niche. Once players are able to tackle the learning curve, they’ll discover enjoyment can be found through persistence.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    I’ve fallen in love with Solar Ash. It proves to be one of the best recent action-adventure games with a stunning sci-fi world, rich with bits of lore and worldbuilding to unravel. It may have come just under the wire in terms of 2021 releases, but it’s still a game that’s a must-play. Step on in and you have an experience with none of the fat and all of the glory. Gameplay that feels fluid and satisfying, moments and cinematography that feel like paintings of art, a story that resolves in an impacting way… this game has it all. Heart Machine you’ve bloody done it again.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Blue Reflection: Second Light is a fresh and emotionally engaging entry into the JRPG genre that shows a lot of promise but doesn’t quite manage to deliver. Gust proves that a game can juggle action, emotion, and story, but that’s not necessarily what Second Light manages to achieve. There are flashes of hope and excitement, and the game does manage to feel distinct in its genre, but it will take a little more polish for it to stand out from the rest.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shin Megami Tensei V is sure to bring a large swath of fresh fans to the series with its beautiful graphics and complex turn-based strategy mechanics. It presents a challenge even on the easiest setting, and the demon recruitment process has been made all the better with livelier, more varied dialogue. Shin Megami Tensei V is only held back by some lacklustre storytelling in the first half, and the unfortunate performance on the Nintendo Switch, which was the wrong console to handle Shin Megami Tensei V’s powerful graphics.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy – The Definitive Edition is an interesting package; despite doing a number of things fairly well such as gameplay tweaks and refreshed visuals it’s hard not to feel a little let down. When you consider all of the possibilities or additional improvements that could have been made, it just feels like Rockstar could have gone further and created some truly memorable remakes or high-quality remasters. All of the games here do look better and play better than the originals, which technically does make these versions the definitive ones, but it feels like a missed opportunity at the end of the day. A few patches will likely take care of some of the more obvious issues, but at this point it is hard to recommend to anyone other than the GTA faithful.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Jurassic World Evolution 2, for all the negative things I’ve had to say about it, is not in itself that bad of a game. It IS however, a mediocre Jurassic Park game, one that has passable mechanics that gel with the franchise about as well as a raptor gels with Samuel L. Jackson. Ultimately, you can’t really look past such an enormous missing of the point and it does besmirch the experience. For diehard Jurassic Park fans like me, the Jurassic World Evolution formula is a hard sell, though park management enthusiasts may get a kick out of this still.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ty the Tasmanian Tiger HD Collection successfully updates the first two games for a new generation of gamers. The endearing characters and story shine through with the beautifully rendered HD world Krome Studios have created, but it really is best played in handheld mode. The voice acting is just as great as it was on its initial release, and completionists will relish in the many collectibles throughout the games. Further fixes to the camera angles and underwater controls would have elevated this game further, and some of its elements feel outdated and a bit too easy, but this is a solid HD update to a collection of classic games that will never go out of style.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Call of Duty: Vanguard is As Expected: The Video Game. You get the polish, the excitement, the rush the series always delivers within the stylised World War 2 setting. This year, the single-player campaign is undoubtedly the standout action blockbuster, with the Multiplayer serving chaotic fun and Zombies mode failing to try something different. Pick it up if you’re already a fan.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Crysis Remastered Trilogy is a collection of games that is a hell of a lot of fun and really is an important moment in video game history. For a while there, it was the benchmark for graphics in games, and it’s important that games like this are preserved and released in their remastered form not just on PC but for modern consoles as well. It’s a bundle for those who love their games to look gorgeous, have the autonomy to blow up stuff in a number of different and creative ways, and love FPS vibes. With all three games remastered and in one collection, Crysis Remastered Trilogy is a lot of big bangs for your buck, despite some shortfalls.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Bright Memory: Infinite will go down as a largely impressive game held back by glaring shortfalls. The frenetic and uniquely compelling shooter/hack ‘n’ slash combat as well as the breathtakingly realistic visuals make for a worthy experience alone. Unfortunately, that narrative is told in a less than elegant way and the quick sprint to roll credits hold Infinite back from reaching its true potential.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pokémon Brilliant Diamond and Pokémon Shining Pearl are faithful recreations of the classic DS titles, updated with plenty of small, ease-of-life changes. While some fans might feel alienated by the features that have been added to make the game easier, the changes are a net positive that make the game a smoother experience all-round. The upgraded Underground and Super Contest Show are both more involved and offer more things to do, and the remade music tracks sound beautiful. Although a lot more could have been done to make these remakes truly special, what's here will make Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl a worthwhile experience for returning fans and new ones alike.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The Last Stand: Aftermath is an engaging zombie-themed roguelike that unfortunately runs out of ideas too fast. The steady voyage across the zombie-infested post-apocalypse whilst scavenging for scarce resources is a tense and fairly enjoyable experience, but only for a while. As a game built around repetition and short playthroughs, The Last Stand: Aftermath recycles enemies and environments too frequently for the amount of time you replay them. The addition of mutations and new player equipment load-outs are a nice touch, but ultimately don’t do enough to mix up the experience. Rewarding progression and an engaging premise mean the game is certainly worth checking out for fans of roguelikes and zombie games, although it might not hold your attention for very long.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite some rough edges, Sherlock Holmes: Chapter One has its heart in the right place. Frogwares is taking the classic Sherlock mythos and spinning off some impressive original work here. The story is well-presented, with the partnership between Sherlock and Jon particularly pleasant. Other cases show some interesting new puzzle types that I have not yet seen before. Whilst the two strengths of this title are separate, which annoys me somewhat, it’s the annoyance I feel when a game is a few decisions short of me showering it in unqualified praise. As it stands, Sherlock Holmes: Chapter One is a standard-setter for open-world mystery games.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Riftbreaker is a chaotic mess that spans several genres and comes out as perfect as Grandma’s Christmas Trifle. It doesn’t make sense at all but it comes together so nicely and seamlessly, it gives the user a completely unique and challenging experience. Whether you are into tower defence, RTS or even bullet hell or hack & slash, The Riftbreaker is going to give you one hell of a wild ride, and you better hang on for dear life.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Demon Slayer -Kimetsu No Yaiba- The Hinokami Chronicles is one for the fans, yet still accessible for beginners. Aside from a few functionality problems in gameplay, it is a great load of fun being able to fight against familiar faces and take the leading role in the story of Demon Slayer. The developers of the game may have missed a prime opportunity to expand on the exploration experience, but at the end of the day, this is a game focused on the thrill of battling against Demons and looking cool while doing so.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    I wish I had more positive points to speak about, but AWAY: The Survival Series just isn’t that fun to play, and being a video game this is one of the most important aspects for the developers to nail. The experience feels unnaturally empty and shallow, and whilst the good intentions are there, the execution makes it a hard title to recommend spending money on, at least in its current state which feels like an early access title, despite it being a proper release. If this title piques your interest, I would suggest waiting to see what the developers end up fixing and tweaking as they have promised to fix multiple issues and provide constant updates to offer a more polished title.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The biggest and boldest Battlefield to date, 2042 combines trademark action with impressive innovations. Experimentation with loadout and attachment changes drive the enormous spectacle of 128 player warzones and dynamic weather events. Hazard Zone provides the grounds for extremely tactical gameplay but needs refinement to make it a lasting experience. The shining star without question is Portal, allowing series veterans to jump back into their favourite legacy maps and muck around with creative modes and features – it's basically four games in one package. If it wasn't for a few poorly designed 2042 maps, combat balancing issues, and performance concerns, Battlefield 2042 might be the best in the franchise.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Demon Turf is a good game begging the eyes of those invested in the collectathon niche. Plenty of fun hours are on offer to watch those numbers tick up and pull off some tight and joyful platforming. It may waver in some of its later combat and ability design, also proving unfriendly for younger audiences. Though just as much forgiveness is issued when you consider how devoted the game is to tackling its genre. If you’re looking for a more modest and fun game to wind down the year, this is it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Riders Republic offers a cornucopia of extreme sporting choices for players to choose from. By giving enough attention and fine-tuning to each individual sport, it has created an evergreen title to receive future updates or expansions to build upon well into the future. With a solid foundation offering solo and group players fun and exciting experiences, Riders Republic has set the stage incredibly well. While its predecessor Steep failed to capture a lasting audience, I feel strongly that Riders stands a much greater chance at retaining players’ interest due in part to its tongue-in-cheek tone combined with the game’s sheer variety of extreme sports adventures and energetic open world. I look forward to returning to Riders Republic to bike down mountain paths or fly through narrow canyon gaps while listening to alt-rock radio sometime soon.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Age of Empires IV delivers an absolute feast for strategy fans, offering several gameplay modes, a beautifully crafted story campaign, and stunning visuals. It may not come with a ground-breaking overhaul when it comes to its gameplay mechanics, but it does stay true to the tried and tested classic gameplay formula, which is sure to delight both old and new fans of the franchise.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The parts of Where Cards Fall I remember most fondly are when it gets out of its own way. When the game successfully captured my interest, it directed my attention towards a beautiful world with a welcoming atmosphere. I vibe out on the board game aesthetic and enjoy the puzzles. But when the game is running too fast near the start, or too slow at the end, you can see the faults that are being concealed. Beyond the mask lies a story that does not engage and presentation that at times does a disservice to its mechanics.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Tunche combines familiar mechanics with a setting that is rarely represented in video games. This keeps the game’s visual design fresh, but the combat is more than familiar and not up to the standard set by other games in these genres. Tunche can’t scratch the side-scrolling beat-em-up action of River City Girls or the honed roguelike structure of Hades. Unfortunately, this means the game’s charming art and characters are at battle with lackluster gameplay.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Voice of Cards: The Isle Dragon Roars is a great little gem to come out of this year. Where NieR is a good series though not quite for me, this absolutely is. The team have created a true sleeper hit that is well worth seeking out for NieR or fantasy adventure fans alike. The music and wondrous exploration on offer are engaging throughout. While other limitations in roleplaying are noticeable, they’re never enough to rob you of your enjoyment. What’s here is some clever and wonderful writing, a charming cast of characters and another weird world worth delving into. Yoko Taro and the team have done it again.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Forza Horizon 5 takes what we’ve loved over the series’ life so far and brings it full circle, with a comprehensive package that includes everything you could possibly want from a racing game. Mexico is an astounding and wonderful location to explore, and production values are on point, from the stunning visuals of its gorgeous open world to the well-executed audio that keeps energy levels high. On top of the diverse range of events we’ve come to expect, Horizon Adventures adds another fun layer of story and player progression that keeps you engaged, and the vehicle handling is, still, second-to-none. With more content than ever before, the Eventlab to make even more experiences and a suite of multiplayer modes to engage with, Forza Horizon 5 is the best racing game available today, bar none.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    To The Rescue! delivers a meaningful message about animal welfare in a family-friendly package. An inoffensive tycoon game full of cute dogs and happy moments makes running a dog shelter a cheerful task. Yet, that task becomes painstakingly frustrating with a poor interface, micromanaging dozens of pups with a limited inventory and clumsy controls. It doesn’t help that there are many, many glitches and game-breaking bugs. Little Rock Games might be biting off more than they can chew with To The Rescue!.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unpacking is a game about making a space your own, taking space up, and making space for others. Each of the game’s levels is a loveable snapshot of believable modern human life. Brisbane-based developer Witch Beam have made a delightful game that I know fans of Aussie indies have been looking forward to for a long time. It isn’t just a fantasy where I’m more organised than in my real life, it’s a relaxing, stress-free experience that I will definitely revisit.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Remaining addictive and compelling throughout, I’m in love with Dungeon Encounters. Ito, Kato and Uematsu make for an absolute dream, being a key part of what makes this the best and most vibe filled rogue-lite experience of the year. Where its minimalistic design may off-put, it’s more than worth moving past that and exploring the genius and wonder on offer. Level readability is so concise and polished. Puzzle design is clever and stimulating, flexing muscles in the brain I haven’t used in years. ATB combat is back and thriving, being the best it’s ever been. Layers upon layers of depth are offered here. There’s so much magic in Dungeon Encounters. I only pray people find the time out of the heavy influx of games to give this one a shot. If you do, you’re in for an amazing ride.

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