Consequence's Scores

For 3,885 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Obsidian
Lowest review score: 0 Revival
Score distribution:
3885 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The singles have zing, the pacing is superb, and the back half is just as fun as the front. With i,i, you feel the whole last decade: the exploration, the lessons learned. i,i is a mature masterpiece and a stunning marriage of ambition and technique.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Part of the fun of listening to How Do You Love? is following the narrative that unfolds throughout, as so much of the album’s smartness lies within the precise evolution that occurs from one track to the other. Unfortunately, though, it is impossible to alert the world that the album is perhaps best listened to in order the first time around.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    At 20, Clairo is already such a fully-formed artist that it’s nothing short of thrilling to envision where she’ll go from here. Immunity highlights her vulnerabilities while showcasing the full range of her formidable strength as a producer and songwriter.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    With their latest studio album, Slipknot have released one of the strongest albums in their career. When it comes to We Are Not Your Kind, Slipknot live up to the title.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    If Cole’s greater purpose was boosting the career of his prodigies, he succeeded. Revenge of the Dreamers III points out the obvious: the complete takeover of DaBaby, the undeniable powerhouse that is J.I.D., and the melodious and irresistibly genuine Ari Lennox.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Volbeat have produced another fun and eclectic album with a plethora of potential hit singles. They don’t stray far from their established formula, but do push the limits enough to keep things interesting.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The snarling enfant terrible with a go-it-alone attitude is now a mentally and emotionally grounded 29-year-old capable of cherishing his loved one. Without question, Brandon Banks is among the best and biggest-hearted rap albums of the summer.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Where earlier efforts such as Hallowed Ground saw the band command sparse irreverence, Hotel Last Resort, much like We Can Do Anything, won’t generate much excitement.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    First Taste is scatterbrained and self-indulgent, no doubt. But that’s also what makes it such heady fun. Segall once again makes the various ideas and sounds floating about in his head something worth listening to.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There’s an abyss between the kid on Acid Rap and the man on The Big Day. And while you can’t blame a man for growing up and aging out of those topics, you can blame him for not being able to communicate in a way that still resonates with his fans.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Heaven Is Humming successfully builds on the foundation laid by Goon’s first two EPs, 2016’s Dusk of Punk and 2017’s Happy Omen. It’s a solid debut that finds the band stretching in a few different directions while remaining conservative.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    From the chaotic opening to the cathartic ending, Krlic’s score works wonders, while engrossing enough to stand on its own outside of the film as well.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    It’s as good a rock record as The Black Keys have in them in 2019, and odds are that will satisfy most fans.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Dudu is a welcome gesture of support from kindred souls. Consumed in moderate doses, it raises the spirits.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The result, if you are willing to engage and get just as vulnerable, is unforgettable. For those who are feeling lost and needing to really listen, Salt will speak loud, and McMahon’s music will remain a steadfast and spectral companion for a very long time.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Individually, almost every song is interesting. But altogether, the listening experience is a choppy mess. Out-of-context cartoon voiceovers and pan-African pop music don’t sit well together. And while some of the long-form ideas partially work, they could have used more fleshing out.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    On this record, he’s taking a stab at, well, every genre. It doesn’t pay off, though, because this effort results in a sense of emptiness, an abyss of authenticity or real feeling. And that’s the problem: Despite writing “emotional” ballads for a huge part of his career, none of us really have any idea who Ed Sheeran is.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Torche may be missing the potency of their earliest work, but the widening palette of influences on their newer material gesture that there are more great songs to come. Admission isn’t their greatest album, but its new ideas are more than worth the price of entry.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    David Berman is one of our greatest living songwriters and he’s returned in beautiful, melancholic form as Purple Mountains to speak to the lifelong nihilistic depressive in all of us.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    From beginning to end, Bandana is a perfectly-paced album. Madlib never lingers on a single musical idea as he chops samples and switches beats, often midway through songs. Meanwhile, Gibbs, an expert in flows and rhythms, glues each song together with his undaunted, straightforward performances, which offer an illusion of effortlessness.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It’s easily Yorke’s best solo outing and rates among his finest albums from any project this century.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    No matter who is in the lineup or what other activity Willis and Warren are up to, Big Business deliver exactly what you ordered time and time again. And that consistency is precisely what makes The Beast You Are such a thrill to listen to and carries with it a small pocket of disappointment.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    First-timers are welcome, of course; as with nearly every record Mulcahy’s made in over the last three decades, The Gus is inviting, infectious, and peppered with just enough enigmas to warrant another spin.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    There is a sort of pure, youthful exuberance to what black midi are making, but their experimentation also carries with it a sense of mission.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    7 is musical Chex Mix — lightweight and best consumed in selective increments, but also strangely addictive.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The industrial and atmospheric elements of the album all convey a sense of searching and often of rushing away from one thing and toward another. Even the blurred cover image of Hatchie suggests a feeling of constantly being in motion. It is through this searching and continual movement that Hatchie etches her own lines to define her persona through her music, constantly propelling herself and her ideas in new directions and trusting that we’ll keep up.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    There’s nothing new under the sun or on this record, but when the riffs are crisp and the harmonies tight, that’s a complaint that’s at least a couple of spots down the list. The Raconteurs won’t save rock and roll, but they’ll certainly help us pass the time until we find whoever will.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Madonna has created this music for an audience of one: Herself. Often it works. Sometimes it doesn’t.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Titus Andronicus didn’t need to further prove themselves with this album, but they did anyway.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    There’s no denying Future’s ability to constantly curate content, but perhaps with a little more time and focus, Save Me could have been significantly better.