Consequence's Scores

For 3,885 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Let England Shake
Lowest review score: 0 Jesus Is King
Score distribution:
3885 music reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 0 Critic Score
    Jesus Is King is impersonal, repetitive, boring, and somehow too long at just 27 minutes. Some albums grow deeper with subsequent listens; Jesus Is King shrinks.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    On this record, he’s taking a stab at, well, every genre. It doesn’t pay off, though, because this effort results in a sense of emptiness, an abyss of authenticity or real feeling. And that’s the problem: Despite writing “emotional” ballads for a huge part of his career, none of us really have any idea who Ed Sheeran is.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Farrell’s ambition is an admirable quality he wears on his sleeve, and at times, he showcases an impressive stylistic versatility. However, throughout this album, he takes indiscriminate left turns, and it ultimately makes Kind Heaven a needlessly gratuitous and pretentious mess.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    The Florida rapper’s limited strengths and many weaknesses become highly detectable on Harverd Dropout. Under Pump’s control, the album piles up songs without structure, lines without meaning, and hooks without melody; it’s utterly tasteless.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    There’s no interruption, no welcome silence between discs one and discs two. No, just 20 songs, a brutal slog of stacks and condoms and stacks and condoms and occasionally a disembodied ass without any other parts of a woman sighted.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 0 Critic Score
    Revival is the most pleasureless record he’s ever made, so stymied by his worst tendencies that like many other inept apologies from 2017 it only points out how much further he has to go rather than how far he’s come.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    With Reputation, Swift seemingly has the idea that bigger, wider, and louder is necessarily better, but the dopamine rush that modern pop music can so reliably produce never arrives.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    A muddled mess of a record from a band that completely abandoned any sense of identity.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    The album falls flat in just about every aspect. It’s not offensively bad, it’s inoffensively boring.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Fitz and the Tantrums is an album that feels, by some bizarre paradox, like both a product of contemporary market forces and a depressing relic of an era of the music industry best forgotten.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    The wheels on the record don’t just tremble and squeak--they completely detach. Eight solo albums in, M. Ward’s indie folk wagon finds itself stuck in the mud.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    When their punches land, you want to bless these guys for sticking to their guns and not growing up. But the misses are real and painful, and they make Taking One For the Team a far more embarrassing listen than it needed to be.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    The riffs are certainly bigger and ballsier than those on the past few records, but Stockdale seems to have lost his personal line to the gods of the ’70s and is left settling for the lesser players.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    The world Grobler crafts on Matter isn’t colored with the iridescent shades of blue from his early career; it is now a palate so bright and garish that it hurts the eyes.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    So much of Ardipithecus is impenetrable, even distancing. The album is a headscratcher, one that shows plenty of promise but also a personality abstruse to the point of mystification.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    As it stands, this album feels like a few good ideas mired in a mess of half-formed sketches, rough recordings, and simple cliches.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Skrillex and Diplo successfully serve up twitchy beats ready to incite anything with a pulse, but the sentiment at the album’s core leans toward insufferable.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Vinyl is not a good format for Montage of Heck, an album that requires a fair amount of skipping around just to qualify as tolerable. I’m using the word “album” loosely here, because this one fails as an album in almost every conceivable way, jettisoning any sense of unity or context in favor of positioning itself as an aural complement to Morgen’s documentary.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    With Immortalized, Disturbed don’t even try.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 16 Critic Score
    The most remarkable aspect of Sirens, aside from its general awfulness, is how unnecessary it all feels.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Rather than braving the road less traveled, Yudin doubles down on his replication of trite indie rock tropes.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Full of internal references to diamonds, fires, love, music, and seizing the moment whenever possible, Deja Vu’s lyrics play like pop music Mad Libs. When they’re not bland, some verge on violently tone-deaf.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    To the Stars… is a messy, frantic collection that suffers from a lack of focus and extremely poor sequencing.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    The problem lies in their vision, and the fact that it’s either too narrow or too cynical to take seriously.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    We Are Undone, masters the sinking feeling of sharing a sweaty car ride or claustrophobic interrogation room with the bad cop/existential mindfuck cop team of Marty Hart and Rust Cohle.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Though only 11 tracks long, No Fixed Address feels rushed and half-hearted.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, Hold My Home is not another baby step in the right direction, but rather a collection of slack-jawed tunes surrounding one or two borderline gems.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Jungle is a polished debut, but there’s no sense that J and T (or whoever is actually singing here) feel any sort of commitment to their lyrics, their arrangements, or anything beyond producing neatly packaged songs that slide them into festival slots.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    We Are Only What We Feel, if you go in expecting very little, can provide some background noise pleasure. But it only lights up for three seconds at a time. And then it’s trash.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    You can applaud them for chasing a creative high, but from two artists of their caliber, listeners should expect something better than High Life.