Cubed3's Scores

  • Games
For 2,640 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 10% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Animal Crossing: New Horizons
Lowest review score: 0 The Letter
Score distribution:
2640 game reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Streets of Rage 4 does a textbook job of balancing between the new and the old. It will appease veterans as a solid update for the series that doesn't skip on fan service either. It's quite admirable how the direction for almost every element, from presentation, animation, music, and story, all adhere to a consistency and aim for a high watermark. For newcomers it's an easy one to recommend as well, as it is easy to understand, and is built upon core mechanics that engage continually when in play, all wrapped up in a modern looking package. It is unfettered by the du jour ideals that can often belie the essence of or memory of the originals. One could even argue that it supersedes them, though time will tell if this is the case.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Frostpunk is quite simply one of the best city-building experiences on the PlayStation 4 with a highly detailed narrative written for four huge campaigns. The sadness in there only being four campaigns is a true testament to the team at 11 Bit Studios, as they have crafted such a memorable experience, with gut-wrenching decisions at every turn. The savagery of the game can have long-lasting effects that can carry into the subsequent play-throughs, as the memories of what arose from making previous decisions can sway future decisions down other pathways. For those who wish to experience a more laid-back 'Sim City' like experience, then this title may not be the right title to jump into. However after experiencing this, it will be easy to feel anxious to see whatever the team behind it has in store next.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This can stand tall knowing that it compiles a number of brilliantly addictive games that can be fun to play alone or with friends. Almost all can be played in a quick pick-up and play fashion, which can be handy for those looking to play in short bursts, whether on a short commute, or in a party scenario. Online matchmaking should perhaps be refined so that people match players first, and select games after, but this aside, 51 Worldwide Games is a fantastic budget title that all Nintendo Switch owners should buy.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Picking up Guard Duty is going to be massively dependent on whether you were around in the heyday of classic point-and-click adventures, or holding onto some morbid fascination for this type of puzzle-filled journey. This a really enjoyable experience that does require that certain way of '90s thinking to complete. What would look like a pocketful of junk, quickly becomes a series of intricate contraptions in the mind of a seasoned adventurer. Length-wise this is short and sweet, if you know what you are doing, but could easily become much longer without proper guidance. Savour it, get lost in the humour and characterisation of each of the common folk, and enjoy a great, nostalgic experience... then petition for another Discworld when you complete it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thunder Force AC is a fantastic classic shoot 'em up, and its inclusion on Switch, along with some added bonuses, is a welcome addition to the SEGA AGES line-up. It is only held back by the lack of the original version, Thunder Force III, of which this one is but a slightly remixed version. Seems like a lost opportunity, but here's hoping the developer won't dare releasing it separately.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Missile Command: Recharged on the Switch eShop, is a cheap release that doesn't do much… but does everything right. It's about just as straightforward as the 1980 coin-op, and it can be had for a little stack of quarters. It is therefore hard to complain at the simplicity, as what is available plays well, at least in handheld mode, and the experience does prove surprisingly addictive. Well, no, it's not so surprising, really - it already was addictive 40 years ago, even on Atari 2600, so it would be hard for it to not be so on the Switch. It may be simple and repetitive, but this is one which, installed on the system, can make a short bus ride or car trip much less dull.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's the sort of immersive, feel-good experience that gels well with a modern quarantined life. It begs to be lost in, and boasts a phenomenal story, memorable characters, and a beautiful world to explore. Not even the periodically clunky combat can get in the way of that.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Dull visuals, repetitive, amateurish electronic tunes, simplistic level design, and a control scheme that simply feels wrong here, make Avoid - Sensory Overload an arcade title that should be… well, avoided.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Tomb Towers is a fun puzzle-platformer; one that's well made, easy to learn, and perfect to kill a couple of hours with, especially since its challenge is as high enough as it needs to be in order to make you feel good about yourself, but never really create any major problems - and it's retro vibes it gives are great too. Sadly, this is one of those titles that won't last for long, and the relatively low level of difficulty makes it a tough recommendation for those who want something that will put their skills to the test.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    While it's nice to see more and more things get ported to the Switch, there are things that belong on the platform and things that do not. This would be an example of something that does not. A truly tedious experience, after just a few hours. The best thing about The Elder Scrolls: Blades is that it's a fantastic advertisement for playing Skyrim on the Switch.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Available on pretty much all of the virtual reality headsets, there is not really any excuse not to pick up this addictive and exhilarating rhythm game. Polished now to a truly premium product, it stands proud alongside other competitors in the genre, and is a compelling opportunity to lift up that headset and go for a dance. The shipped tracks combine a diverse and perfectly curated blend of synth and electronic music (with a bit of rock thrown in there) from the likes of Parov Stelar and Jamie Berry. A game for fitness, a game for fun, Synth Riders is worth picking up for any VR owner.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Monster Energy Supercross - The Official Videogame 3 does indeed capture the sport down to a tee, and has incredibly flexible, and deep customisation tools, that are able to thrust a player into the AMA Supercross universe. Its unforgiving difficulty and steep price point is probably the stumbling block to making this a renowned and accessible racer, but at the same time the purists who love a good challenge will absolutely adore the subtle tweaks that can be made to player setups. Anyone who adores the sport will love this, but those hoping for a leisurely, easy racer to play through, will be sorely surprised.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Moving Out is an incredibly funny and light-hearted experience. Especially the local co-op option promises tons of fun for a small group of friends, or for playing with the family. This title is definitely recommended for those wanting to be entertained and frustrated at the same time.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's great to see a developer so early in its life step out and experiment with new genres, and 505 games has taken its signature art style to create a stunning, original world. The battle system and depth of the roster make for an experience worth replaying and experimenting with, and is complemented by the platforming sequences between the combat. While the linearity of the metroidvania aspects leaves a lot to be desired, the fundamentals of the platforming are wonderfully realised.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The visual style may not appeal to everyone, but Milo's Quest is an indie title worth checking out, with its shorter length reflected in the price. Replayability is dependent more on the ability to appreciate something that's cute, because there are no worthwhile goals once the game is complete - but that in itself is not a negative point for some people. Speed runs are encouraged, yet again are dependent on what a gamer enjoys doing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A great rhythm game doesn't necessarily mean a great Hatsune Miku game. Yes, the songs are brilliant and varied, and the gameplay is unbeatable in the genre. A hundred songs sounds amazing on paper, too, but it's just a fraction of the game Mega Mix is ported from, and the conversion hasn't fared too well when looking at handheld visual quality. The number of tracks cut out and sold back as DLC is unforgivable, too - just because it is the norm doesn't mean it shouldn't be called out. Future Tone players can pass on this, but this still comes highly recommended to Switch owners and anyone desperate for portable Miku. Just be sure to wait and buy at a discount.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This DLC is not limited to just aesthetic changes, but brings in a lot of mechanical changes, ranging from transport to citizen care, and even a whole industry. Sunset Harbor offers the means to make your city one that stands out from the rest, and delivers more for the environment and your citizens. If you want to take your city building to the next level, this is a must-have DLC pack.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    In the few hours that Not The Robots will last, it will provide almost equal measures of enjoyment and frustration, with Lady Luck usually deciding what it's going to be each time one gives the randomly-generated levels of the campaign a shot. In the end, though, its main problem is exactly the fact that it will last for only a few hours.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Tharsis is a time-waster. Nonetheless it is a time-waster that's thoroughly recommended wasting time on - particularly good for fans of strategy and decision-based titles. The difficulty will occasionally peak unfairly, as chance dice requirements can cripple a play-through, even on the lowest difficulty setting, often, though, and probably intentionally, requiring one to make a lose-lose decision to progress. Dice physics may also seem to be working against the player on re-rolls, though it's a small niggle. Whether it's despite or because of this, Tharsis kept this reviewer coming back for more. It is compelling attempting to make it to week 10 and the planet Mars - with just enough variance and those difficult choices that it doesn't get boring seeing the same story beats over and over. It's probable that this will stay loaded, on console, for return visits for quite some time to come.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Words of encouragement on screen do a lot to help players to keep on going in Super Phantom Cat Remake, which is balanced well with a variety of characters to love, and special moves to enjoy. Certain enemies who are hated in earlier levels, end up likeable for their usefulness in puzzles. Even the hardest of puzzles seems fun because of the novel ways they are solved, and not all are mandatory to move forward in the story, making this cute cat game a must have for all platformer lovers.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Trials of Mana is the best entry in the franchise since 1999's Legend of Mana. More than adapting Seiken Densetsu 3 as it was for a modern audience, the remake consistently expands upon the mechanics and core design of the Super Famicom RPG. Flat but engaging level design now has a layer of verticality, with plenty of secrets to uncover; combat strikes a sweet balance between skill-based gameplay, with even stronger party customisation than the original; and the plot, while simple, never compromises its integrity for modern narrative conventions, resulting in a story that's as classic in tone as it is theatrical in scope. The remake is only held back by issues exclusive to the Switch port - lower frame rate and resolution in comparison to the PS4 build - but even that isn't enough to sour the experience. With an attention to detail that honours its source material as much as it elevates it, this is a new gold standard for video game remakes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    ARVORE has done the impossible here, and has taken one of the best VR experiences on the PSVR, and managed to make it even better in almost every respect. Full to the bring with nostalgia, and not resting on that simple premise to sell, Pixel Ripped 1995 races through the finishing line with tight gameplay, excellent use of the VR system, and fully developed characters framing the era perfectly with their dialogues and observations. Get it, finish it, and then wait patiently for the next jump in technology to be turned into a title as fantastic as this one. Pixel Ripped 2000 anyone?
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The few performance issues aren't enough to keep Lonely Mountains: Downhill from being a must-have for Switch owners, whether a racing fan or not. The result of this masterful mix of the beauty and serenity of nature, and the gripping challenge of extreme mountain biking, is a genuine classic, one with an insane replay value hidden behind its simple concept.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Few retro handheld fighting games hold up today, but SNK had already done a good job getting the gameplay of The King of Fighters functioning well on the Neo Geo Pocket Color, and SNK Gals' Fighters still proves fun for some casual bouts in this Nintendo Switch port. A lack of gameplay depth, inability to convert some moves to unused buttons, and confusion in how to unlock characters is a shame, but the additional options introduced, including the excellent multiplayer setup to allow for instant local fights on the go, really make this more enticing, and much more tempting given the price.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There is everything here to make a great game. The only thing it really needed was a few more months testing things out. Notably, the graphics need some upgrading, and combat devolves into repetition very soon. Smoothing some of these problems out would easily push this into a very high recommendation. As it stands now it acts as a novel throwback if nothing else.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though the difficulty is going to put off a lot of newcomers to the genre, the truth is that most of the love for this title is still going to come from gamers who grew up, not only with a yearning for an age where the achievement was simply completing a tough brawler, but for the age itself; when stoner humour was prevalent, and where, with just a little scratching of the surface, you could find real emotional depth and good feeling in movies such as Mallrats. Jay and Silent Bob: Mall Brawl doesn't rest on its laurels, though, and provides as much depth in its combat as any Smith vehicle. The health regen through character switching also makes it far more tactical and rewarding than expected. Fun as a solo adventure, and a riot with a hat wearing friend, settle in with a chocolate covered pretzel, and tell them and as many others to check this one out.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    50+ hours of addicting, fun, fast, and easy-to-understand gameplay awaits fans of roguelikes in Pirates Outlaws - plus some simple, yet beautiful, and varied visuals, and hundreds of unlockables (and achievements, for those who care about those). The thing is that the whole thing is a roll-of-the-dice kind of deal, not a turn-based strategy that's mainly about skill. Luck always played a big role in the genre, sure, but here it probably plays the only role. Again, this is fun… but it takes a very specific kind of mind-set to enjoy.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The saving grace for Thunder Paw is that generally sprites are cute, and music hits the mark for driving progress forward without being too repetitive. Whether or not that's enough to entice is up to the individual to decide. There's conceivably a compulsion to play on and best the unfair challenge, particularly with an early monkey boss level, which required keeping up with an increasing pattern speed in spite of a gimped weapon range. One hopes it might be a worthy first attempt, and it is if that's the case, but otherwise it is just a bit "rough." An oddity indeed.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In less than an hour, you'll shoot at Aztec zombies in the face with your shotgun, crush-stomp acid-spitting bugs, lob freezing grenades at cyber-Nazis, blow giant, fire-peeing robots to smithereens, and laser-blast the behinds of alien invaders. You lost? Fury is now stronger, so enter the fray once again - and again, and again, and again. If a fan of over-the-top action, Fury Unleashed is an easy recommendation.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In a sea of mediocre, mobile-born, turn-based tactical RPGs, it's easy to find something even more lifeless than Dread Nautical, but that doesn't say much. Zen Studios' creation lacks the depth usually expected from the genre, is way too repetitive, and even seems uncertain of what kind of atmosphere it wants to have. The only dread players will feel here is from the lengthy loading times.

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