Exclaim's Scores

  • Music
For 3,401 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 All This I Do for Glory
Lowest review score: 10 Excuse My French
Score distribution:
3401 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's still room to grow, but their adventurous spirit on display across the record will hopefully make for some compelling material moving forward.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not just for Dave Matthews Band fans, Ryley Walker's The Lillywhite Sessions is a reminder that taste is subjective, timing is everything, and you don't always choose the ones you love.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There is a sense of indulgence here, moments that could read as self-important, particularly when Kozelek dips into criticism, but themes of loss, of displacement, and of holding onto what has held you in the past bring completeness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's an admirably strange structure--one that doesn't make much aesthetic sense, but keeps things unpredictable for a whopping 83 minutes. ... A weird and wonderful farewell from the idiosyncratic project.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    9
    Conley's lyrics and vocals are the boldest missteps on 9. Contained in what sounds like a grown adult emulating the vocal tonality of an angsty teen, are even stranger lyrical approaches.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Thought Gang is for lovers of non-expositional storytelling, crude mystery, lipstick-red esoteric jazz, and noise.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Combining the passionate onslaught of hardcore with a reasonable portion of grunge and radio-ready power pop, the New York group's cynical punk tone often feels effortless. If you're just hearing of Drug Church or weren't sold on their two prior works, now's the time to stay for a sermon.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Queen of Golden Dogs is more than a collection of novel (or classical) ideas, as much as it's a assembly of gorgeously written and expertly arranged musical concepts, showing Vessel making some of the most clear-eyed art of his career.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At only eight tracks, it's the shortest Smashing Pumpkins full-length and it feels less grandiose than most of their work simply due to that brevity, which makes it harder to measure against their other LPs--although it easily blows the last album out of the water and is more immediately catchy than Zeitgeist.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    By creating longer songs that echo the hypnotic nature of house, the band draw listeners into the feeling of the beats and bass that anchor Nagano's melodies. In doing so, Little Dragon succeed in giving listeners a taste of the dance world they've entered into, in all its myriad forms.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Artists that push themselves with every release are rare, and rarer still are the artists where each new frontier is a successful one. Objekt is one of those, and Cocoon Crush demands to be listened to intently and completely. The arrangements themselves are never predictable, twisting and turning with opportunistic glee, marrying the fluidity of his role as a sonic architect.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lyrically, all three mine traditionally sombre territory in their solo work, tying into broader cultural conversations regarding gender and mental health, and the words of boygenius maintain the same power and urgency.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Teetering between organized and messy, the melodic and chaotic, Bought to Rot is what Grace considers her "Scorpio album." Presenting herself bare, she exposes unfiltered honesty through the kind plain-spokenness that's, nowadays, avoided by contemporaries of her stature.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This will probably be labeled a folk-rock record, but at its core Elastic Days rocks.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tracks like the funky "Can't Fight the Feeling," "Love Jones" and "I Feel a Change" aren't '60s soul throwbacks so much as they are genuine articles, with the now-trademark Daptone sound feeling fresh and vintage at once.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The record starts to lose a little momentum near the end, and some parts of the record float by without registering much of an impression, but the highlights usually make up for this. Sometimes she gets too laidback for her own good, but St. Louis has enough charm to make the record work.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Time 'n' Place is challenging, but its rewards are commensurate, and while the band may lose some of their more fickle fans with this release, it's always refreshing to see artistic growth put first, especially when it pays off like this.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    FM!
    Vince has managed to not only be acerbic but entertaining on his newest release. Its only drawback is its extremely short runtime.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The takeaway from Takeoff is that good art is deliberate, enjoyable and actually takes effort. It's good to see he's capable of all these, can't wait to see what he gives us next.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Awe-inspiring and unforgettable.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dionysus sounds both ancient and contemporary at the same time, and there are not many groups that can show so much reverence for ancient traditions from a modern music perspective. Their eclectic approach to songwriting goes far beyond contemporary music genres, and that is ultimately the record's biggest asset.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The last two Pistol Annies albums ranged from very good to brilliant; this album seems to be a breakthrough, a masterpiece that extends their already formidable gifts.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Ultraviolet is indebted to the charm of the natural world, but with it, Moran unlocks dazzling new ones in the process, keys jammed firmly between the strings of her instrument.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Sure, it would've been nice for Jenkins to offer even more such insightful commentary on this LP, rather than devoting the bulk of his lyrics to braggadocio. But this creative, star-studded album nevertheless showcases Jenkins' potential to fill the late Scott-Heron's shoes as a rap poet laureate.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Freed from the studio sheen that bogged down much of the material in the post-Berry years, the songs are given the room they need to breathe, and make a case for R.E.M.'s second act being filled with overlooked gems.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Starter Home is a mostly quiet album despite its many players.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While Keith Flint and vocal partner Maxim aren't as prominent as they sometimes are on this outing, the bludgeoning beats and aggressive synths remain, with perhaps even a bit of classic rock swagger thrown in early on.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Heavy on mood and light on melody, Stadium plays best as background music that you're instantly and repeatedly rewarded for tuning into, but it does little to demand the listener stay engaged, content to let you visit this strange and fascinating world at your leisure.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Psychedelically haunted and spiritually free, Life After Death isn't just an escape from the world we're confined to, it's a multi-dimensional confrontation, compositions conversational as they are challenging.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On Through a Wall, Single Mothers have managed to preserve something old and mix it with something new.