Gamer Escape's Scores

  • Games
For 245 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Infernax
Lowest review score: 30 Cave Digger
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 18 out of 245
245 game reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Cult of the Lamb is the most hard-to-put-down game I’ve played all year. It’s so easy to get that “Ok just one more” itch of wanting to head out and get the last few materials you need for that new facility, or deciding you’ll just do a little bit of redecorating and next thing you know the sun is rising. That’s not to say it’s completely perfect. There is a little bit of that indie game jank, it’s not terribly long, and there are a few bugs here and there ranging from minor graphical ones to more major ones that halted my progress temporarily. Thankfully the devs are already hard at work on a patch, and while the main story may be short, I’ve managed to sink 20 hours in so far and I’m nowhere close to stopping.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Still, if you really like tactical RPGs like this, it’s a different style of play and it has some noteworthy potential in how its gameplay is delivered. I don’t dislike the game; I just wish it did a little bit better on delivering on its promise. That’s by nature going to be a very subjective statement, and it isn’t a bad game, but I think anyone who isn’t looking for a new strategy RPG experiment will find this one a bit underwhelming. But hey, if the narrow options and the promise of roguelike gameplay interests you, this is one to check out all the same. It’s not bad, by any means. Just doesn’t really light you on fire.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    All in all, I wouldn’t completely label this game as not worth playing, but I do suggest tempering your expectations so that there is minimal disappointment as you progress through the story. That isn’t to say I regret playing it, but I don’t think I would’ve missed much if I hadn’t.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Returning Gunvolt fans will find plenty to love here, and I believe this game can act as a great entry point for newcomers as well. Whether you want to master the systems and chase high scores, or just feel like a god smiting every obstacle in front of them, there’s still plenty to enjoy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When all is said and done, it’s a game in which you are given the feel of managing a somewhat volatile drug empire with a bunch of violent people who are more than willing to break the law in the name of their own self-enrichment, and that alone is enough to make the game fun enough to stand on its own. It justifies its existence and goes above and beyond in a lot of places.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Endling – Extinction is Forever is a bold, unique, slow burn of a game that excellently conveys its ecologically conscious message and paints a dire image of rampant industrialization on a personal, microcosmic level. Because of this success, the game manages to garner an amount of player investment that belies its short runtime, but that runtime is also one of the game’s biggest hurdles when contrasted with its relatively high price tag. Had more steps been taken to engage the player in the minute-by-minute gameplay or encourage replayability, the number below might have been a notch or two higher. As it stands, however, Endling is a game where the gameplay and mechanics are readily outclassed by its theming and presentation. It’s certainly an experience worth having, but not one that lives up to its full potential.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There’s so much to do and Sunbreak offers you even more ways to do it with the new flexibility found in its updated combat features and absurd amount of new content that will easily take you hundreds of hours to get through. So whether you’re this is your first time in the Monster Hunter universe, or you’ve been playing since the very first one, I strongly advise you to get out there and enjoy this amazing game, as the best actually managed to get better! There has absolutely never been a better time to get into it. I hope to see you on the hunt!
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Ultimately it’s just a tedious, scowling experience substituting actual improvement for growling noises and the occasional neon sign. And that’s disappointing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Messy as it is, Sonic Origins is still a collection of the best 2D entries the franchise has to offer. It may not be as dense in content in comparison to prior compilations like Sonic Mega Collection or Sonic Gems Collection, but it does just enough to not get in the way of what made these games system sellers in their heyday. While I was hoping for an easy touchdown, this ended up being a fumble recovery instead. Hefty price tag be damned, new players deserve to see why people like me keep going back to what many consider the reason people loved Sonic in the first place.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Three Hopes is really good. Really, really good. If you’ve already loved Three Houses, this is beyond a worthwhile purchase. If you haven’t, then here’s another point of entry to a world I love. And considering how different this game is from its predecessor, it makes me happy to see that the game’s setting and characters can hold up even in a very different context.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Slowly working your way through the hotel, taking in the gorgeously detailed environment, wracking your brain to figure out how to progress, remembering all of the blocked paths you can now access with a newly acquired key item—these are the moments when the game is at its absolute best. Had the title leaned into this as the main aspect of the experience, you could very well have been reading a recommendation for one of the genre’s premier titles. Instead, Fobia – St. Dinfna Hotel is an amazing exploration game that periodically gets in its own way with lackluster shooting and action sequences. It’s still well worth your time, but it’s disappointing to think about how much more it could have been.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All in all, playing Birushana: Rising Flower of Genpei was a real treat. It has its moments where the story can feel like it’s dragging, as well as a few grammatical errors here and there, but if like me you have aged out of cutesy, under-developed romance games and prefer more mature themes and realistic (albeit still animeish) characters, I recommend you pick this up.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If you’re a hardcore Ninja Turtle fan or someone looking for a fun as hell beat ’em up to play with friends on a pizza-filled Saturday night, you’re going to have a lot of fun no matter what crowd you find yourself in. It succeeds in bridging the past and present, and knows how to hit the mark for any fan. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shredder’s Revenge is a worthy follow-up to an arcade/console classic, and a game worthy of counting itself as one of the genre’s best examples of how to do a beat ’em up right. This is Turtle Power at its absolute best.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    More than anything, Card Shark is an experience. It’s not an exceptionally long game, coming in at eight hours, but it very much suits its length. I wasn’t left unsatisfied, nor did it feel padded. The emphasis on the tricks themselves was oddly compelling as well. By the end of the game I had learned the theory behind a good number of techniques, and I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t tempted to practice some of these for real.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even with the heavy hitter Dragon’s Trap missing from this selection, Wonder Boy Collection is still a great option if you want to experience a more obscure retro franchise for the first time, or go back and revel in nostalgia. Also, with the prices the original Monster World IV goes for at the time of writing, this is probably the best way to play through that game without blowing up your wallet.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dwerve is a difficult game to put down. It incorporates the strategic aspects of tower defense with the reactive dodging of action games and fully reaps the benefits of both elements. Having to approach each of the varied combat encounters with tactical and mechanical skill creates a layer of engagement that not every game can reach, urging you to keep playing and tinker with your approach all the way up to its conclusion. Despite its somewhat lacking storyline, Dwerve is a fun, challenging trek through dangerous dungeons and dwarven history that carries itself with aplomb.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    LIGHTKRAVTE is not going to be everyone’s cup of tea, I freely admit that, but it did the thing that Kurt Vonnegut once said every story should do: It used the time of a complete stranger in a way that didn’t make it feel wasted. And quite frankly? If you’re the sort of person who generally doesn’t think much of visual novels? This might be worth a look after all. It’s a story that not a lot of games tell, told in a way that serves to show off the strengths of a visual novel rather than its weaknesses.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If this game cooked for another six months to a year, the devs could take it beyond just having the basics to being something truly special. But as it stands right now, this game does not really offer enough satisfaction and enjoyment to be worth its asking price.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I think given its replay value and strong narrative foundation alone, this is an easy recommend from me. I just hope that Big Bad Wolf Studio eventually does go in and iron out the evident bugs in the game, both visual and otherwise. I also can’t wait for them to release more narrative games of this caliber. I genuinely think they are a breath of fresh air in an otherwise saturated market.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Neptunia x SENRAN KAGURA: Ninja Wars succeeds at being a fun crossover and a decent enough game to play. It’s solid enough to satisfy fans and newbies alike, has a solid gameplay foundation, and isn’t afraid to let loose when the time calls for it. There’s enough here to keep you busy, and everything involved is at least competent enough to keep your attention. So long as you aren’t expecting Game of the Year material, you’ll find yourself having fun with this one. If your aim is to coast and relish in a little bit of cheesy ninja action, this definitely fits the bill.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If your group of friends is looking for a new party game, you really can’t go wrong with what’s on offer here. If you already own What the Dub?!, though, there really isn’t all that much new here to justify double dipping.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While it may not be as truly groundbreaking as the original, The Stanley Parable Ultra Deluxe is a must-play for fans of the original – and if you’ve never experienced the game, it’s the perfect place to learn what made the original so brilliant while finding a number of new twists.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Rogue Legacy 2 is a wonderful, beautiful, crazy-hard-and-yet-not-at-the-same-time game. I can hardly stop playing it long enough to finish writing this review. It is hard to find flaws in this game without resorting to extreme nit-picking. Every aspect of it just oozes polish. The replayability is off the charts, even after you finally reach the ending. Even if roguelikes/rogue-lites or metroidvanias scare you for their reputation of being too hard for the average gamer, play this one. It absolutely deserves a spot right up there with the best of them, including its genre’s namesakes. You may have never heard of Cellar Door Games unless you played the original Rogue Legacy, but I truly and honestly believe you owe it to yourself to give it a try.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    I want to like this game, I really do. When it works, it works really well. The core gameplay loop is satisfying, the two ideas mesh believably, and figuring out how best to manage the species on a given level is like a fun little puzzle. Actually reaching later planets makes me feel like Sisyphus rolling a boulder up a hill, with the content I’m repeating feeling no different than it did an hour ago when I started my last run.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If you’re really into management sims, you’re going to get something out of the game. But otherwise, as much as I love the look and charm of the title and the concept, this is probably not going to find a forever home in your library.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Taken as a complete package, Lost Judgment and The Kaito Files serves as one of the best story offerings I can think of in recent memory. With as fantastic as the former’s story was, I’m overjoyed that the story in the latter at least maintains (and often exceeds) the standard we’ve come to expect from Ryu Ga Gotoku. While the somewhat steep price tag might be a bit high for DLC, the densely packed narrative and trademark gameplay helps take the edge off. It proves that Kaito is more than capable of carrying a story, and I can’t wait to see what his future holds.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s buggy, the balance is off, and a good 80% of the locations only really serve as random sidequest destinations. But the storytelling drew me in, the stealth worked rather well, and on the occasions when I felt like I had resources to burn it was just so dang satisfying to slow motion dive out from behind a corner while blasting a barrage of shotgun shells.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I dare say the KickStarter that supported this release would have done just as well if it was an actual card game. I think that could definitely work and if it isn’t in the cards (wink), well, it should be. Regardless though, this game is a great value with it’s strong replayability, and it is definitely worthy of recommendation to fans of the genre, but I think even other curious souls out there should give it a go. It’s is very pick-up-and-play and could spark a new interest in a new genre for you if you are that curious soul.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you have any interest in the old days of FPS gameplay when you were expected to wade in, unleash firepower at top speed, and leave a mess in the process, you will want to play this game. And if you’ve tried to play those games but can’t get over the gap in technology, this is going to be a darn fun experience for you as well. Give this one a shot; it deserves everything it’s asking and then some.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    All in all, this was actually a very bittersweet review for me. I am a huge Rune Factory fan and have been excitedly waiting for this new entry in the series. Unfortunately, I can’t say that it met my expectations. The good news is Rune Factory 5 is a familiar experience for those who are used to the genre. The love interests are a bit cringy, and it has god-awful graphics, but if you have a bit of patience and don’t nitpick as much as I do, it will be a mostly enjoyable experience. The combat is easy enough to get into, there are a ton of things to do, and some of the supporting cast will make you smile. I clocked about 64 hours into this game and I’m pretty sure I could have done more, so it’s at least a bang for its buck if anything. I’m just hoping that if Marvelous Inc. makes us wait another ten years for a new entry, it is of a higher quality.

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