GamesBeat's Scores

  • Games
For 714 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 79
Highest review score: 100 Crash Bandicoot 4: It's About Time
Lowest review score: 13 Defenders of Ardania
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 22 out of 714
730 game reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Galactic Civilizations III is a great 4X space strategy game, one that will keep you pushing for one more turn late into the night. If you’re looking for a terrific multiplayer experience, GalCiv III won’t scratch that itch, and some parts of its core pacing stumble. But the combination of depth, ease of gameplay, and a sometimes-funny, snarky aesthetic, make GalCiv III a delight to play.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    It’s like a free game, and not an awful one. But when you judge on its own, it’s novelty quickly becomes tedious.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It’s a little sad that Star Fox Zero, a game that wonderfully shows the benefits of the Wii U Gamepad, came out so late in the system’s life. Still, it’s worth getting for anyone who owns the console, especially if you were a fan of the series in the ’90s.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Bravely Second is something of a rare JRPG sequel. It features the same battle system, world, and many familiar characters from the original. The new Jobs and even more convenient features for grinding make it a fun adventure for anyone who loved the original.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The success of the Souls series is largely tied to its capability to force players into a cautious, careful mindset. But in Souls 3, the developers appear to be playing things a bit too safe.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yes, MLB: The Show 16 is more of the same in a lot of ways. However, new features like ShowTime and modes like Conquest give this entry enough new toys to feel like a meaningful improvement over last year’s entry. If you’re a fan of the series, this year’s version is worth checking out unless you’re suffering from the most severe of digital baseball boredom.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The story is quite elaborate, the human character animations are outstanding, the performances are great, and there are some real moving moments in the game
    • 77 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Beamdog’s first effort at original storytelling is a good start, and I’m excited to see more in the future, even if it’s in the world of Baldur’s Gate.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Day of the Tentacle is a classic, and this remastered version is a great way for old fans to see the time-hopping adventure looking its best. Hopefully, it’ll also give a new generation of players a chance to experience all of the silliness for themselves...The few technical terrors I encountered were annoying, but they only momentarily zapped the smile that I wore throughout the rest of my playtime.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    Pokkén Tournament isn’t quite as successful as some of the other Pokémon releases and other genre experiments (Pokémon Conquest comes to mind), but it offers high-energy battles and a unique framework for fights, even if it could use some tweaking.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Twilight Princess succeeds largely because of its fantastic dungeons, and the HD enhancements are enough to give fans an excuse to go riding through the plains of Hyrule once more.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    Far Cry Primal shows us that gaming still has plenty of interesting worlds to take us to. Its Stone Age setting really is its best quality. Sadly, the series’ formula is beginning to feel familiar and, frankly, a little dull. The first-person combat is tedious, and I think I’ve cleared out enough enemy camps for one lifetime.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Fire Emblem: Fates is a fantastic turn-based strategy game. If you’re worried about the multiple versions, you don’t need to be. You’ll get a full experience with a single campaign, but it’s great to know that you can keep going and discover new content long after beating a single path.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    People who got into the fighting game community with Street Fighter IV may not want to hear this, but from a base design, Street Fighter V is by far the superior game. Capcom has paved over and smoothed out a lot of the things I didn’t like about Street Fighter IV’s design. A lot of those issues created poor play habits, which makes it feels like Capcom is making small steps to mature the game, and in turn is trying to mature how the player base plays fighting games.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    Firewatch is special and rare...It tackles mature subjects, but it isn’t just telling a story. It is using the medium of gaming to say something to the player. Maybe that was especially effective for me because I’ve avoided asking myself the questions that Firewatch poses. But I think it’s important that a developer can wield this kind of power, and I want more of it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    ColdWood has succeeded in a handful of bold ways with Unravel. It is showing EA the value in smaller, quieter games. It also feels like another fresh take on the side-scrolling platformer. And while Unravel drove me mad a couple of times, I was mostly thrilled by its wonder and adventure.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It has more than enough to satisfy the hungriest RPG fans: fun exploration, in-depth combat, and a scope that will keep players engaged for a very long time.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Some life-long players of the franchise may not feel like Explorers has enough Final Fantasy for them. It has a lot — and lets you customize much of it along the way — but it just doesn’t have that “magic feeling” I get when playing a Final Fantasy and knowing that game’s world is at stake.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Games don’t have to be fun. They can have more value than that. And I’m not saying The Witness can’t be fun, but it’s just as often frustrating.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    Somewhere in Paper Jam are trappings of a great game.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Most of all, it’s ambitious. Mobile games and music games both tend to get short shrift when it comes to emotional narrative arcs. Lost in Harmony commits to one, and does its best to bring that through in level design, musical selections, and even small details like costume picks.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Star Trek: Timelines offers a lot of fun for mega-fans of the franchise, but understand that you won’t get as much out of it as you would want unless you’re willing to spend some money. And, once you start, it can become hard to resist the temptation to drop another $5 for another chance to unlock a rare character or ship...Of course, I wouldn’t put up with any of that if the game wasn’t so much fun.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    I commend ACE Team for trying to come up with something that’s authentic and clever. But the developer only got The Deadly Tower of Monsters halfway right. The excellent premise and likeable characters outshine the streamlined gameplay.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    RE Zero is a great example of why old-school horror releases are beloved and special. With a few new technical upgrades, it has largely made a graceful return on current systems.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    Oxenfree might just be a big next step for adventure games, particularly when it comes to the way it presents dialogue choices. Night School Studio has managed to execute an interactive story that treats player choice in a mature and subtle way. It’s an emotional experience with wonderful characters and great writing, and it’s one that masters its 70s and 80s influences.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    How you feel about Tharsis probably depends on how you feel about board games, soul-crushing challenges, and shorter gaming experiences. If you love tabletop games, repeatedly dying while learning, or heavily micro-managing resources, Tharsis is a worthwhile way to spend an evening.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    It’s content to give you a solid, lasting sense of satisfaction from pushing buttons in the right order and hearing some good music.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Magic: The Gathering fans will be surprised to see how much of that card game’s mechanics remain intact in this match-3 version, and even casual mobile fans who have never played the original can appreciate Puzzle Quest’s added depth to the formula. You’ll even get a lot out of it without spending any real money, although the thirst for more cards will definitely tempt you.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Guns Up! will look familiar to a lot of players through its similarities to Clash of Clans. But, it has enough going for it to be unique and enjoyable. It is vastly more interactive than a lot of asynchronous multiplayer offerings that have proliferated on mobile, and it successfully brings some of the accessibility and simplicity of mobile games to the PS4 console.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    I love that this game exists. It checks the boxes that it absolutely needs to hit. 60 frames per second? Yes. Cool look and sound? Definitely. A sensation of speed that doesn’t seem possible? For sure.

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