GameWatcher's Scores

  • Games
For 2,022 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Grand Theft Auto V
Lowest review score: 10 Haunted House: Cryptic Graves
Score distribution:
2024 game reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Darktide’s incomplete crafting system doesn’t allow you to efficiently refine gear. Its rewards are scarce and unsatisfying, especially going into the endgame. Optimization is not great, while its cash shop holds hostage any remotely worthwhile cosmetic upgrades so far. It’s a real shame, because all of these missteps cast a dark shadow on its excellent, visceral combat – that evolves Fatshark’s addictive co-op action formula – alongside what’s quite possibly the best depiction of the grimdark universe to grace video games to date.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord is very much a superior sequel in so many ways. It’s still a bit of a brick wall to get past in terms of understanding its finer points, but keep hammering away and you will find them.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Evil West’s old-school sensibilities aren’t what drags it down, although its linear levels might not appeal to everyone. Its combat feels glorious when it clicks, but it struggles to find its stride, resulting in a fun but rather unremarkable adventure. Fights range from exhilarating to boring and outright frustrating, its story is entirely forgettable and lacks memorable characters, while a lack of polish in terms of smaller details like NPC models and cutscenes makes it hard for it to properly stand out. But if you’re looking for an excuse to brutally execute vampires with an arsenal that looks, sounds, and feels great to use, there’s enough fun to warrant picking up Evil West, as long as you keep its flaws in mind.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    Obsidian has a fantastic history of ambitious RPG titles, but none feel as confident and refined as Pentiment. This is a game that truly understands the intoxicating nature of choice in video games, and rewards you with cynical torment befitting the world it portrays.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A short, sharp cooperative puzzler with a fun time-spanning twist. The Past Within sees Rusty Lake go all out to make the purest kind of cooperative experience possible, and ends up doing a fine job.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Against The Storm is simply one of the best city-builders in years.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Victoria 3 is a political and economic simulation of unparalleled depth, complexity and indifference to you. Stumble upon a narrative hook and it can reel you in, even if it struggles to maintain a human connection.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ghostbusters: Spirits Unleashed is the closest we’ve yet come to an authentic Ghostbusters experience. Undoubtedly better with friends, it’s still a genuine thrill to play alone - especially if you’re the ghost.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Warner Bros. attempt at getting things going again with Gotham Knights feels largely flat thanks to unwieldy movement and a world that is more “checklist” than immersive, but in small doses it can be fun, and the heroes all feel unique and work well in co-op multiplayer.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A Plague Tale: Requiem's trump card is the variety of gameplay sequences between which it alternates. At its best, it spices up the original's stealth action-adventure formula with new ways of eliminating foes or holding rats at bay. At its worst, it has you slogging through tedious or frustrating stealth sections. This is a sequel that's bigger, longer, and worth playing if you're invested in Amicia and Hugo's story. But while it successfully avoids repetition, a lack of truly interesting gameplay mechanics alongside disappointing optimization that makes controlling Amicia feel unnecessarily clunky at times hamper the overall experience at launch.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Blackmill Games’ dedication to history and realism is certainly commendable, but the result is a game that will only appeal to a very select audience. That said, Isonzo is capable of producing some incredibly tense and atmospheric gameplay.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Metal: Hellsinger’s infectious blend of rhythm game and first-person shooter elements gripped me all the way through its story mode and beyond, despite its mostly disappointing boss battles. Its roaring metal soundtrack ebbs and flows around how well you deal death to Hell’s denizens, constantly pushing you to do better...It’s some of the most intense action that I’ve experienced this year and a game you should definitely put on your radar, especially if you love both first-person shooters and metal music.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Cult of the Lamb is memorable for more than just this silliness, though. While the combat falls short after extended play, developers Massive Monster must be commended for a brilliant blend of ludicrous violence and cuteness that stands tall as one of 2022’s best games.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Not only does Two Point Studios manage to successfully build upon everything Two Point Hospital did right, with Two Point Campus it’s added a whole new level of learning and given its flavour of sim game a more intimate aspect to management that’s endearingly reminiscent of The Sims.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Stray is at its best when it lets you do the things you’d expect from a cat – sleeping on cozy pillows, meowing, or scratching sofas – but fails to build consistently compelling gameplay around these flavorful bits. Although it creates a believable world, I found it hard to connect with the robots you encounter across its forgotten city, making the game’s admittedly grand climax feel hollow…There’s plenty of attention to detail going into certain areas, but once the credits rolled, I was disappointed to see the cat I played as was just a vessel through which I experienced someone else’s story…Stray works and runs smoothly but is ultimately a fairly inoffensive game with a handful of special moments, that also happens to have a cat as its leading character. You can do much worse, but you can also do much better.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    I don’t think Starship Troopers: Terran Command does much new in the real-time strategy genre, but the use of the license gives real flavour to the solid meal that the gameplay provides. Plus, a good bug hunt never goes out of style.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With The Quarry, Supermassive heads back to the woods with mostly positive results. The story is not much to write home about, and the paring back of physical control of characters' actions leaves some empty spaces. Still, the cast is generally likable, the presentation impressive, and there's plenty of joy to be found in manipulating the lives of these poor young souls. The Quarry has plenty of thrills, chills, and kills, but also an abundance of filler.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    There’s not much about Sniper Elite 5 that’s particularly remarkable. That, however, didn’t stop the visceral X-Ray kills and the simple act of mowing down Nazis to see me through to the end of its campaign. There are plenty of other games out there that do stealth, action, or World War II better, yet the series’ formula is very much its own and does manage to carry a game that otherwise struggles to do anything interesting. Its flexible difficulty, the tension of invasions, and gruesome long-range executions keep things fun if the very premise appeals to you. But certain antiquated design choices and guns that don’t feel all that great keep Sniper Elite 5 from being memorable.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    We Were Here Forever gives no quarter in its cooperative puzzling, fully trusting players to get on with it and work together. At its peak, the wondrous structure of this game is simply sublime, and perhaps the most invested I’ve felt in a co-op game since Portal 2. It doesn’t always hit those highs, and matchmaking was personally hit and miss, but We Were Here Forever generally dazzles.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A surprisingly polished game that’s as immersive and exciting as it is relaxing, Hardspace: Shipbreaker makes disassembling ships in Zero-G a blast.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Saber Interactive has crafted a highly entertaining asymmetrical multiplayer game in Evil Dead: The Game, and a lot of that is down to an understanding of how best to implement the quirks of the source material into game form. With possession, slapstick, gore, violence, chainsaws, and malevolent trees, Evil Dead: The Game is as Evil Dead as it could be.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even when you do get a sense of the rhythm of its battles, there's always something to keep you on your toes, making Warhammer 40,000: Chaos Gate - Daemonhunters well worth giving a shot if you're a turn-based tactics fan.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Lego Star Wars: The Skywalker Saga does a fine job of reinvigorating the Lego game formula, even if it continues to be mired in gargantuan amounts of busywork. Most importantly, however, it’s a highly entertaining Star Wars spectacle that brings humor and joy in Sarlaac-sized portions.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Tiny Tina’s Wonderlands plays it safe, never leaning enough into its fantasy elements or bringing any significant changes to the Borderlands formula, but offering more of the fun looting and shooting the main series is known for. It boasts better writing and humor than Borderlands 3 while throwing in interesting spells and class powers that spice up its otherwise familiar combat system. Repetitive dungeons and a tedious endgame drag it down a bit, but if you’re looking to shoot dragons instead of bandits and sift through an endless stream of guns and items in search of the one that works slightly better with your build, Tiny Tina’s Wonderlands has got you covered.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With a few of its existing rough edges smoothed out, Death Stranding Director’s Cut manages to be a more approachable experience than its previous incarnation, and for those coming back to it, there’s just enough new to warrant a second journey across America.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    Ghostwire: Tokyo isn’t bad or broken. It’s just a game that’s not particularly ambitious and almost feels at odds with itself, leaving it with a lot of wasted potential. It might yield a couple of interesting online searches if you’re uninitiated in Japanese folklore, and you can pet lots of dogs and cats, but there are ways to go about doing those things without sitting through Akito’s snoozefest of a tale.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Elden Ring is a walking example of a 10 out of 10 game that isn’t perfect. No game can be perfect but there is just so much in here to love that it becomes hard to pay attention to its mistakes. Every handful of hours had the game open up more and, every time, I was desperate to keep searching, exploring, conquering. Now, over 100 hours later and two playthroughs, all I want is to discover more of what Elden Ring has in store for me. This isn’t just one of the best From Software titles but one of the best games I’ve ever played and I would be shocked if this didn’t have reverberations on the entire games industry.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    There are a lot more intricacies and features we didn’t have the time to go into here, but suffice to say Distant Worlds 2 will keep you interested in its universe for a long time with no shortage of mechanics to learn. If large scale galactic strategy is your idea of fun, you can’t go wrong giving Distant Worlds 2 a chance to shine.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Far: Changing Tides largely sticks to the same recipe as its predecessor, making its vessel more complex and sending players on a journey through a different world. Its description as a companion game is fitting – although you will get slightly more out of it if you play the series in order – and while I loved the original, the sequel didn’t grab me as much. There’s something great about helping the small protagonist make a big hunk of metalwork by diligently pressing buttons, loading items into the furnace, jumping on bellows, and lowering the mast so it doesn’t collide with incoming structures. But pacing problems, environmental storytelling that’s a little too vague, and an art style that sacrifices contrast for a richer yet muted color palette, ended up making me less invested in the world and Toe’s journey. I’m glad I saw it through; I just don’t feel the same mixture of awe and sorrow that was so prevalent in its predecessor.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    ELEX II will be an understandably divisive RPG, as is almost a given with Piranha Bytes’ titles. There are performance issues, incoherent conversation options, and some iffy combat. Yet its freedom is genuinely impressive, and its kitchen-sink approach to every aspect of the experience at least makes for an intriguing, if uneven, package.

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