GameWatcher's Scores

  • Games
For 1,856 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Mass Effect 2
Lowest review score: 10 Haunted House: Cryptic Graves
Score distribution:
1856 game reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    While there are moments where the spookiness clicks, like its hectic climax, the rest is forgettable. It will give a fright once in a while, but that shock quickly disappears. It’s the fluffy type of horror, something with the trappings but not the depth. It’s not an amateur production, but it is less eerie than it should be. Horror is subjective, but I cannot suggest DARQ for its scares. Playing it made me crave the more refined games in this genre. If you’re a streamer who needs a game to scream at, this will do fine. Just don’t be surprised if you forget about it the moment you turn it off.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    An interesting DLC with a fantastic weapon system and concept, but somewhat of a letdown execution.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If we view Gibbous - A Cthulhu Adventure in the most “objective” terms, it technically gets things right. It looks stylish, it runs smoothly, and it doesn’t come with the bugs you’d expect from modern gaming. However, the details that make a game a hearty recommendation aren’t there. It’s got heart, the amount of care put into its art proves that. But an average story, simple puzzles and shaky voice acting makes for a game pleasant to view but not amazing to play. It can be an alright introduction to the genre for people who haven’t experienced old school adventure games and don’t want to use walkthroughs. Anyone else will find a title that’s pretty, fluid, and underwhelming.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    I was surprised by Planetfall, lest of all because I was never a big fan of Age of Wonders – not because it was bad, but because it never grabbed me. This entry was different, however, with the focus on 4X expansion and the draw of close-range squad engagements with ranged weapons, bombardments, and customisable heroes was enough to get me invested, and was put together well enough to ignore most of the flaws in the squad combat system. They are still noticeable and frustrating enough to force me to take a break every once in a while (even when constantly winning battles), but if you are looking for an engaging, sci-fi 4X with more character and presence than the abstract grand-strategy Stellaris, Age of Wonders: Planetfall is the game for you.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I quite liked Heretek due to the way it adds up to the base campaign while simultaneously making use of your characters and giving you new ways to progress. If you’ve been looking for an excuse to get back on the metal shoes of a Tech-priest, look no further – Heretek might be exactly what you’re looking for.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Night Call is interesting in ways most games aren’t. It’s a game that humanizes people that usually get mockery. It’s so good at this that it overshadows the serial killer stuff. It can lose its steam thanks to some repetitive gameplay, but its shorter length prevents it from dragging on. Its design choices will turn away action-oriented players, but it’s a pleasant surprise if you want more compassion in your crime fiction.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Essentially, Field of Glory: Empires is a quintessential Slitherine game. Big scope, big idea, but executed in such a way that will not click with anyone, but the nichest of fans. It doesn’t really add anything that was missing from any other grand strategy game, and all of the glory, character, and scope of the Roman Empire is virtually nonexistent here, feeling instead like a virtual version of a very charmless boardgame. However, if you’re a long time fan of Field of Glory (or a hater of Imperator or Rome II), this game might end being right up your alley.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    An interesting game that scratches the detective itch, without ever reaching great heights.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As far as additions go, the Chaos campaign is very much aimed at pure fans. The ships were all in the main game and could be used in skirmishes, meaning most of the price of this DLC goes towards the new campaign and its characters. If you enjoy Armada II’s gameplay and wish you could make the life of everyone in the galaxy rather worse by spreading evil and corruption, this is the DLC for you.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    I’m someone who finds it hard to care about retro homages, and Gato Roboto is the exception to that rule. It’s fun, its challenge isn’t overwhelming, and Kiki is now part of the pantheon of gaming’s cutest cats. The short length might be a source of contention in the future, but I’ll gladly take something that lasts as long as it needs to over something that meanders a couple extra hours. This game is not only an exceptional love letter to a bygone era, but its modern sensibilities don’t get in the way of the challenge. If you love the design of retro games but wished their difficulty was balanced rather than frustrating, Gato Roboto scratches that old-school itch.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A surprisingly good minor DLC which effects can be felt throughout almost a whole campaign.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Building on its predecessor’s mixture of RTS and RPG elements, SpellForce 3: Soul Harvest provides an engaging recipe that we don’t often get nowadays. A stand-alone expansion in the traditional sense, exploring its 20-hour long story campaign means uncovering a plot with significant consequences alongside a handful of charismatic companions. Whether delving into ancient ruins as a party of four or leading armies on the frontlines, Soul Harvest’s unique blend of RTS and RPG is one worth experiencing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    A capable yet uncreative and unimpressive game that feels straight out of the early 2000s.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The new units, setting, and the story makes for a nice little package that feels fairly priced. If you liked Ancestors Legacy and just wanted a reason to go back to the title, then Saladin’s Conquest is about as good a reason as any. There’s nothing wrong with what’s on show here, however, despite the new things mentioned it does have a “more of the same” feeling to it. That’s not necessarily a bad thing and no one is expected to reinvent the wheel each time - especially if it’s an extension of what’s already there. And what’s there is technically sound, from the AI to the optimization. It’s hard to fault Developer Destructive Creations for wanting to squeeze a bit more capital out of their solid title.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Dollhouse sports some interesting gameplay features and mechanics that are let down by some noticeable flaws. As a horror package, it can provide some genuine moments of tension and panic. However, once you become accustomed to your relentless stalker it may become more of an annoyance than an object of fear. As a result, the gameplay can become rather repetitive. The story, though short, is an interesting one. However, once it’s completed there is little desire for a re-tread. That’s not to say it’s not worth visiting the mind of Marie if you’ve got a hankering for a Film Noir horror story. Once upon a time, I would have recommended this as a rental.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Rage 2 has some problems, but taken entirely as an FPS it’s probably my favourite game of the year so far. The open world needs a bit more personality, there needs to be more actual story missions, and you could drown in the amount of upgrade options there are - but none of that matters once you get into combat. I spent over 20 hours in Rage 2 and every moment was a blast, with constantly exciting shooting that rivals Doom for thrills. And I’ll be carrying on playing it after this review, too. If you’re looking for a 100-hour open-world game, look away. If you want an FPS, look no further.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Three Kingdoms is a good game, and it feels like relearning an old game – it sticks to the Total War formula, but changes so many things around that everything feels different.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The scene of crossing a battlefield, with hundreds of lifeless bodies piled over each other, only to see a swarm of rats bursting out of a horse’s bloated corpse is just one of multiple sights that A Plague Tale: Innocence inevitably etches into your mind. Although its stealth and puzzle mechanics aren’t exactly fresh, having what’s, quite possibly, the most powerful representation of the Black Death in the medium, even if stylized, is reason enough to see Amicia and Hugo’s journey to its end.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A very barebones remaster that is great for newcomers, but unnecessary for owners of the previous game.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The way you can tell a critic liked a game is whether or not they’ll go back to it on their own accord when their review is finished. That is exactly what I’m doing with Yakuza Kiwami 2. It fixes some of the most glaring problems the first Kiwami had and that gives us one of the best Yakuza games on PC. There’s plenty of games to play, dudes to fight and people to help, and it almost never feels wasteful. If you crave an honest-to-god open world without the obnoxious filler of similar games, Kiwami 2 is wonderful for any sandbox aficionado.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A very Paradox game, in both a good and bad way. It has all the hallmarks of a good game, and I look forward to seeing continued development as time goes by.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A capable coop shooter with a lot of potential and amazing swarm mechanics.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Increasingly complex yet approachable, Anno 1800 is an excellent entry in the long-running city building series that both challenges but also leaves space to admire one’s handiwork.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even though playing the Phoenix Wright Trilogy in 2019 reminds you how times have changed for the better, it is still a worthwhile compilation. Fifteen years after Phoenix Wright was brought to the West, its charm and strong narrative are still as resonant as it was in 2004. If you still have the original trilogy somewhere, you don’t need to rebuy this unless you’re a fanatic. But if you’re someone who never played a game in the series and want to know what the fuss is about? This is well worth your time. It’s silly and some design choices can force the game to a crawl, but it’s very easy to persevere to see what happens next.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It certainly feels like the best Tropico game - but anyone who’s played a previous Tropico game might get bored at doing it all again (although the excellent missions help) and anyone who hasn’t might struggle to progress. In the end though, it’s still a worthy follow-up.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Two Point Hospital was one of the best games of 2018, and the Pebberley Island DLC doesn’t let it down. While the first level relies on crazy weather and useless janitors it’s merely a way to get you up to speed before the true, imaginative, creative weirdness of levels 2 and 3. The game forces you to change up your tactics, and throws you real challenges you’ve never faced before. It’s clever, and tough, and it’s never less than incredibly fun. It may be only three new levels, but if you need some more Two Point Hospital in your life, you won’t do better than visiting Pebberley Island.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    A great game with fantastic world building and gameplay, The Division 2’s most egregious issues can easily be fixed during its lifetime.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The LEGO Movie 2 is a great movie! But the Videogame has no dialogue between characters, and very little of the meta zaniness that makes the movie pop. It’s got some shining moments, such as huge boss encounters, but this brave new world of LEGO games needs some more refinement. It’s Telltale’s Jurassic Park rather than Walking Dead, then.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Devil May Cry 5 is a stellar return to form for the series, capitalizing on all the elements that make it great. Charismatic characters and stylish, over-the-top fighting mix together into an experience that keeps you hooked to your seat for the initial 15+ hours, and possibly more as you delve into higher difficulties. With very little beating around the bush, and a combat system that’s easy enough to grasp but takes a while to master, the title successfully pushes you to learn its combos, while providing an awesome power trip. Gorgeous and intense, Devil May Cry 5 is an unbridled serving of the purest form of action that few other titles pull off quite as well.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    In the end, Gathering Storm brings a few new toys to the sixth entry of the classical turn-based franchise, but does hedge a few bets on the natural disaster part of the deal. While those are an interesting addition, they are not meaningful enough to spearhead a whole expansion – and certainly not at the full prices charged by 2K.

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