GameWatcher's Scores

  • Games
For 1,923 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Portal 2
Lowest review score: 10 Haunted House: Cryptic Graves
Score distribution:
1926 game reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A good management game with superb visuals, offering enough freedom to let you build your own merchant empire in the Caribbean to your heart’s content.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A real remaster that thoroughly updates an 18-year-old title into a proper next-gen game, and actually makes it better than the original.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even if RollerCoaster Tycoon 3 hasn’t aged as gracefully as its predecessors, there’s plenty of fun to be had. If you still have the original and can run it fine, you don’t need to buy it again. But if you’re someone who never got to play it, can’t run Planet Coaster, and miss the old school approach to the Tycoon genre, the Complete Edition is a neat relic to a bygone era of gaming. Just be prepared for some outdated features and a shockingly small UI.
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    All in all, Isle of Siptah is an interesting addition to Conan Exiles, even in Early Access. A beautiful and varied map helps create a very intriguing place to explore, and the game does eventually open up from hordes of skeletons to werewolves, giant alligators, and even a dozen different bosses. Due to the large MMO-like scope of the game itself and short review time, I was able to beat most of the normal content but never got to the stage where you discover all the secrets of the maelstrom and find out if you can control the huge Kraken in the sky – but if you’re a big fan of Conan Exiles and want more than just dominating a scorching desert, give this expansion a shot and I’m sure you will be able to find out. [Early Access Provisional Score = 75]
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    As Far As The Eye is an interesting title, but it feels more artistic than functional. It is a perfectly serviceable game and it has lovely production values, but this is not the kind of title you look to for depth or range. On the other hand, if you want a specific, focused peaceful survival experience about tribes making their way to a safe place and don’t mind this being more of a puzzle than a proper strategy game, definitely give this little indie title a try.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Star Renegades had me enamored from the opening cutscene and sunk its claws deep with its tactically-sound combat, incredible aesthetic, pulse-pounding soundtrack, great story elements, and superb writing. I wish that its meta progression elements were more significant and that it didn’t insist on being yet another rogue-lite, but I still felt compelled - even after some really sour defeats - to come back and fight the good fight against the Imperium...Put simply, Star Renegades is one of the best indie game experiences I’ve had all year. Full stop.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Necromunda: Underhive Wars is a capable strategy games full of tactical options, but the glacial pace will put more people off than draw them in.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Inertial Drift is an espresso shot full of arcade-y goodness. Its approach to drifting isn’t just intuitive, but it encapsulates that Initial D fantasy wonderfully. It might be shorter than other games coming out, but that time spent is enthralling and well worth it. If you love arcade racing, you can’t go wrong with Inertial Drift’s “easy to pick up and tricky to master” style.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A superhero game where heroes are quite fragile, Marvel’s Avengers is constantly in doubt of where it wants to go and ends up arriving nowhere.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Kingdoms of Amalur was one of the most underrated games of the previous decade and its return will make that pretty clear to some players. However, the remastering of this borderline classic is hamstrung by a 2012 inventory and menu system, a 2012 user interface, and 2012 icons and health bar. That being said, the updated environments, characters, and other elements do look great and the actual gameplay is superb. However, it feels like a wasted opportunity that THQ Nordic didn’t spend the time to bring those lagging elements into 2020 along with the rest of the facelift.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At the end of the day there is a huge amount of content here, and everything is extremely replayable due to the open-ended nature of the gameplay (not to mention an unexpected sandbox mode). So, if you’re up for an addicting experience that meshes puzzles, driving/boating/piloting and balancing acts into a single creative concoction, I’d definitely recommend Radical Relocation.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    WRC 9 will come with the racing sim action you’ve come to expect from the franchise. This also means that it’s not for everyone and can get bogged down in micromanaging in its career mode. It’s not for everyone, nor does it sell itself for the uninitiated. But if you enjoy the cars, the managing, the challenge, WRC 9 will be your cup of tea. Everyone else should find something enjoyable but nothing that’ll hold your attention for long.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    In all, Kill It With Fire is shockingly fun for its simplicity. A game that wields excessive violence against the spider menace as many have wanted to do for so long, or perhaps at least joked about doing. The environments are very quaint and nice, which makes the surprising amount of destruction gamers can pull off all the more entertaining and appreciated, and the spiders that fill them are smart and sneaky little buggers since they can and will hide behind objects… including debris if gamers are a bit too eager to blow everything sky high. Definitely a worthwhile title if you want to kill some spiders.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A side-expansion of game mechanics and an interesting alternative experience full of indigenous Chinese and wild (but tamed) animals.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As much as it remains a numbers-driven grand strategy game, Crusader Kings III masterfully paints a complex medieval world teeming with living characters that have desires and ambitions. Its mixture of familiar and evolved systems enhances its roleplaying and emergent storytelling potential. The actions that you perform always feel like they’re the result of a process or skill your characters have naturally gained and there’s always something to grab your attention. And so it did, as for 70+ hours we were completely absorbed by warfare, realm management and court intrigue, which, it turns out, we haven’t had enough of just yet.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I haven’t enjoyed an RTS game this much since Company of Heroes 2. Forget the comparisons and enjoy Iron Harvest for what it is: a squad-focused, narrative-driven, old-school real-time strategy game. If you enjoy your RTS games with a strong single-player element and a multiplayer scene that is seemingly well balanced and competitive, then there’s a lot to like here. I wish the production values were higher in both the cutscenes and the audio and voice-over elements, but if you can look past that as I did, Iron Harvest can be a lot of fun.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 35 Critic Score
    It’s been awhile since a game repulsed me. Not in a gruesome or transgressive way, just in a way that’s unenjoyable thanks to frustrating controls and its unfunny execution. Don’t get me wrong, it’s clear in its intent and you’ll know how you feel about it early on. However, it’s very unappealing and is a reminder as to why these sorts of games are better as experiments rather than full releases. If you like overcoming frustration, maybe you’ll find something worthwhile. I don’t.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    A fantastic RPG that superbly mixes player choice and great combat to something bigger than the sum of its parts.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    While Peaky Blinders: Mastermind has some style and a novel approach to puzzling, it's not enough to properly engage. It definitely clicks at times, and there are moments where solving a problem makes you feel like a meticulous planner. However, there aren’t the eureka moments you’d expect from better puzzles nor mechanics worth mastering in replays. It’s hard to recommend and it’s only for a niche of Peaky Blinders fans who want an average puzzler with a lot of dull micromanaging (if they even exist).
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a haunting and beautiful world as a backdrop to a solid “Souls-like” RPG, Mortal Shell is a much better game than it has any right to be. The magnificent presentation, mixed with the unique take on character progression, steals the show here and despite dying dozens upon dozens of times, I was hooked from the moment that combat started making sense to me.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Total War: Troy makes some curious changes to the Total War formula, but the less streamlined resource system, extra micromanagement, and weird mix of reality and mythology work against its favour to create a less than entrancing experience.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I was unexpectedly charmed by Skully. With some excellent controls and a story told earnestly, I was gripped throughout its entire run. Sure, its shorter time might turn off some and its collectables aren’t that worthwhile, but it more than makes up for that. It doesn’t waste time and it makes for a pleasant romp. Suffice to say, I’m curious to see what Finish Line Games makes next.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s obvious that it’s a Dark Souls rip-off, but it’s a good rip-off. It’s fun to beat things down, and that certain style of combat is rewarding when you get the hang of it. But its flaws can make or break the game depending on personal perseverance. It can be confusing and its messaging system is less legible than Dark Souls, but it’s got that combat loop that makes Dark Souls (and Hellpoint) work. If you can forgive some unoriginality, you’ll have fun with Hellpoint, especially with a mate. If you can’t, maybe you should finally give Bloodborne a try?
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A combat system that’s deeper than it first appears is the real star here, but you’ll likely also stick around for the perverse and disturbing universe and the story that plays out within it. The voiceover work will quickly annoy you and the difficulty is unfair, but there is still a bit to enjoy here, assuming you can ignore some of Othercide’s shortcomings. I wanted to like Othercide much more than I did.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    As awesome as it is, the arcade action in Destroy All Humans! is only a part of the experience, struggling to carry its rudimentary stealth missions and hit-or-miss writing. It’s definitely a blast to level entire neighborhoods and disintegrate humans; we just wish we had to spend less time impersonating them.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 35 Critic Score
    While Terrorarium comes with a delightful morbidness and some style, it’s not engaging to play. Escorting the Moguus loses its luster fast and becomes frustrating. There’s a repelling quality to the game that can’t be saved by its comedy or art. Terrarium feels more akin to a tool, something to introduce game students to puzzle design. Maybe it works fine for someone who wants to learn design, but I can’t stand playing the game itself beyond ten minutes at a time. In theory, it’s a wacky puzzle. In practice, it’s an unfun slog.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Part racing game, part destruction derby, and even part tower defense, Rock of Ages 3 is all ridiculous fun. With a variety of gameplay modes and a map editor, there’s a lot of life to this game, too. Rock of Ages 3 is a game that focuses on just being plain ol’ fun and you know something? It really is.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Death Stranding is a masterpiece of game design which surpasses your every expectation.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Beyond a Steel Sky reminds me a lot of the Telltale games, but better -- it has the writing, the plot drama, and the voice actor quality that made the older adventure games such a success, but with a modern engine, present-day graphics, and a full 3D camera that beats all Telltale offerings into a pulp. I was actually a bit surprised by how less serious BASS2 starts compared to the previous game, but it eventually evolves into a more significant tale as things are not what they seem and start to unravel, revealing their dark side. In the end, Beyond a Steel Sky is a surprisingly good adventure game -- which is no small feat in today’s industry -- and while different from BASS, it matches the original’s quality. If you’re a fan of old LucasArts titles, Telltale games, or one of the many people that waited 20 years for BASS2, this is definitely an adventure game you should get your hands on.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Superhot: Mind Control Delete’s focus on improvisation and rogue-lite elements excellently complement its “time moves only when you move” core gameplay loop and distinctive aesthetic, making it a first-person shooter that fans of the genre shouldn’t miss.

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