Glide Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 891 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 26% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 79
Highest review score: 100 We Will Always Love You
Lowest review score: 40 Weezer (Teal Album)
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 891
891 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Beachwood Sparks hit the cosmic canyon touchpoints and beyond on their short but sweet return to recording Across The River Of Stars.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As Barnes embarks on this new phase, Lady On The Cusp stands as a powerful, multifaceted expression of their artistic journey.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It captures the joy, complexity, and spirituality of mambo, making it both a tribute to the past and a beacon for the future. Whether you are a seasoned mambo aficionado or a newcomer to the genre, Caracoles is a must-listen, promising to lift spirits and inspire dance floors worldwide.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is a cohesive collection of tracks, personal experiences, and the broader human condition. While some may find it a bit nostalgic, the album’s raw and real approach, combined with its lighthearted moments, makes it a compelling listen.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rather than completely reinventing himself via the new moniker, Sturgill Simpson delivers more of his same idiosyncratic stylings. Passage Du Desir uses a classic Nashville base that allows ‘Johnny Blue Skies’ to springboard to more pop-oriented sounds and slightly tripped-out structures with varying degrees of success.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Like Jon Batiste’s recent effort World Music Radio, by trying to reach out to the masses, the spark that makes Lake Street Dive engagingly hard to classify has evolved into its bold shot at populist appeal.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    No wonder this eccentric ensemble continues to make albums like Valley of Abandoned Songs that reaffirm the notion great music is timeless.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Small Medium Large is a must-listen for fans of experimental and improvised music. It showcases the quintet’s remarkable synergy and individual talents, making it an album that listeners will eagerly revisit.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Into The Blue introduces us to Frazer’s ambitions of redefining the modern soul landscape while reminding us he had a hand in shaping it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s a depth to the sonics that belies the skeletal two guitars/bass/drums arrangement even as the mix highlights the aforementioned Nitzsche’s electric piano on “Winterlong”). The latter composition has only appeared before as an inclusion in the 1977 anthology Decade. But that piece of forlorn glory was nonetheless different from this one, as is also the case with a jovial rendering of “Wonderin’,” a Young original that would eventually appear on 1983’s ever-so-quirky Everybody’s Rockin’.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The beauty is in the simplicity. If nothing else, this proves that Johnny Cash is irreplaceable. It’s both refreshing and sad to hear him again.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With South Of Here and its moments of vulnerability, Rateliff and his band put out an impressive record for anyone who hadn’t been paying attention the last few years. They are clearly still just as potent as they were a decade ago.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite being their tenth album, Pond continues to push their artistic boundaries, blending innovation with their distinct psychedelic roots. Stung! stands as a testament to their enduring creativity and knack for crafting compelling music, making it an ideal soundtrack for the summer.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The original songs, written by either Gilmore or Alvin, including one co-write, are generally quite strong yet there are only six of those among these eleven. The duo made some astute cover selections but would have been better served with more original fare.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    MESTIZX stands out not just as a musical album but as an impactful cultural statement. Ferragutti and Rosaly have crafted a work that is both a tribute to their ancestors and a manifesto for future generations.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Despite the multitude of contributors, Placenta maintains a natural, cohesive flow. Niño’s role as a facilitator and catalyst is evident throughout, as he channels the creative energy of his collaborators into a unified, organic whole. .... Niño continues to push the boundaries of musical expression, and Placenta is a shining example of his visionary artistry.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Decemberists return better than ever. As It Ever Was, So It Will Be Again is the band’s longest and most rewarding album to date. The Decemberists take the art of the concept album and fill it with as many fantasy tropes as possible, creating a sonic journey that deserves your undivided attention.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Attention to sonic details and layers of instrumental touches, combined with the harmonious vocal connection, deft songwriting, and easy-rolling charm, makes Keep Me on Your Mind/See You Free Bonny Light Horseman’s most complete album to date and a joy to experience.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This terrific project has its shining moments, with a few missteps along the way, yet it will likely go down as a winner. This aggregation of talent doesn’t come along often.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    To be sure, those moments on Sam’s Place that sound like vintage Little Feat are fleeting. But there’s no denying how this unit’s bond retains an authentic feel for numbers like those of the inimitable blues poet Willie Dixon.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The band – still comprised of all three founding members – singer/guitarist Janovitz, bassist Chris Colbourn, and drummer Tom Maginnis – approach this record with the same relaxed, effortless vibe that made the trio such a consistently great act throughout the 1990s. The harmonies on “New Girl Singing” and the effortlessly cool vocals on “Recipes” and “Come Closer” sound like a band that have spent decades working together and anticipating where the song goes next.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For many, Thompson is an acquired taste. There’s little, if any, middle ground. So, while this may not attract new fans, it will more than satisfy the legions of those who stay attuned to his every move. It’s as solid as any of his recordings.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ghostface Killah’s Set The Tone is a sprawling album with risks that give some rewards and moments that uplift the whole album. While the LP dips into songs that sound forced, the authentic tracks make up for the lost time. He shows that he can keep up with any of the modern rulers of the genre. His rapping abilities and booming delivery have matured like fine wine.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album is a darkly sweet exploration of heavy themes like cancer, death, and motherhood, delivered with a newfound confidence and maturity. On News of the Universe, La Luz has crafted an album that sounds timeless yet fresh, pushing their boundaries while maintaining the hypnotic beauty that defines their music.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By design, Lives Outgrown does not have the danceable grooves of Portishead’s music, but fans of the more experimental aspects of Gibbons’s former band should love the album. The orchestral compositions and atmospheric tension paint bleak portraits well-suited for Gibbons’s somber voice. That voice is as good as ever, able to wring drama from each utterance of her poetic tales of loss.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In terms of tone, production, and energy, Neon Pill feels connected to Social Cues. And like that album, there is plenty to enjoy, even without the powerful guitars and frenzied vocals. This softer Cage still has the grooves and melodies to keep things interesting while the band gets more comfortable.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The collection of songs is ambitious – at times brilliant and other times tedious. But you can’t accuse The Avett Brothers of simply rerecording the same album over and over again.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Throughout Rhumba Country, Pokey LaFarge broadens his sound, effortlessly bringing in world influences to help accentuate his retro Americana core, positively crafting one of the most enjoyable efforts of his long career.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Funeral for Justice finds the band flying high while creating songs they believe passionately in, resulting in the strongest album of Mdou Moctar’s career.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    We have two different records. Disc One blurs genres, while impassioned jazz rules Disc Two. As for dancing in the literal sense, those moments come infrequently in this massive (Kamasi knows no other way) project.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Lemon Twigs creates a meditative bliss on A Dream Is All We Know. Whether they’re making pop tunes that evoke the serenity of cherry blossom trees or bluesy rock that fills the room with heavy riffs, this project has a specific calmness that found a home in Beatles-inspired pop.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Crockett has a potpourri of songs here, from the relatively simple country ditties, to arresting narratives, to those filled with symbolism that demand multiple listens. He remains squarely in the front row of today’s best writers.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Moving in a lot of directions, That Delicious Vice proves that Kid Congo & The Pink Monkey Birds are willing to experiment with sound and scope to deliver their tunes, even if not all their outings are successful.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The first half of the Wiggle Your Fingers is fine if not particularly notable, but things improve significantly on the back half.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Over the course of more than a dozen records, the Old 97’s have experimented a bit and tempered their sound from time to time, but American Primitive is a return to their Clash meets Cash roots.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For all the celebrated figures accompanying him, Ian makes Fiction his show, one that’s as (thankfully) understated as it is penetrating.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Every tune here would be a candidate for a film score, much of the moody and dramatic material conducive to Hitchcock. .... The Umbria Jazz Orchestra, with its blend of brass and woodwinds versus the heavy string emphasis of the Brussels Philharmonic, adds completely different sonic textures. Ringing guitar notes reverberate and echo with more authority as the ensemble extends them. The blending sounds are captivating, and Frisell’s trio mates also seem more at the forefront.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Simple on the surface, basically a country blues effort, the album has a sneaky quality. It will grow on you after a few listens.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Tarantula Heart is messier than most Melvins albums, and it doesn’t have as many great hooks as fans are used to. While it doesn’t hold up to the band’s best albums, there’s plenty to enjoy for those who like the band’s quirkier side.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sun Without The Heat is an engaging musical journey through Leyla McCalla and her band’s vast influences as the impressive artist keeps crafting engaging music for the body and mind.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On Up On Gravity Hill, METZ” sound evolves as the trio explores new sonic pastures while keeping their core intact.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pernice, rightfully lauded for his classic pop songwriting and arrangements, has been compared to Burt Bacharach over the years. You can hear that influence in songs like “What We Had” and “December In Her Eyes,” two tracks that sound a bit dated and out of place on an otherwise great return for Pernice and his band.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Those dulcet tones of Knopfler’s voice remain immaculately intact. Now 74, every aspect of his artistry remains at its consistently high quality. As with the past few releases, Knopfler waxes mostly nostalgic here again on One Deep River.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His major shift in styles may not be for all of King’s fans, but it is hard to find much fault in his new, raw, soul-drenched efforts, as King clearly has struck a rich vein when it comes to his songwriting and recording style on Mood Swings.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The eight tracks produced by Tucker Martine (Sufjan Stevens, The Decemberists, My Morning Jacket) in Portland, OR include some music that, while it is legitimately based on a formidable tradition, nonetheless doesn’t sound quite so personal or powerful as the best Parr performs elsewhere here (or on the pinnacles of his past like his eponymous album of 2019). .... Fortunately, the moody likes of “Bear Head Lake,” call to mind Charlie Parr at his most scintillating on 2017’s Dog.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With an impromptu air that belies how deeply the musicianship reverberates within, the cut ["Po Black Maddie"] ultimately turns as stirring as it is infectious, a description that might well apply to Hill Country Love as a whole.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The duo of Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney have found that creative musical joy again, with the overarching feeling on the album being, fun.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By bringing things down to the basics, Khruangbin seemingly reinvented itself yet again without pushing too far into the future and looking too much at past success. The band is stubbornly present and takes its time creating a meditative album lined with moments of instrumental bliss and newfound territories for the band to explore.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Only God Was Above Us is more than another Vampire Weekend album, it is an amalgamation of their storied career and experiences wrapped up in a fearless take on what their genre can become.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Musically, songs like the rollicking “Dogbane” and the classic country vibe of “Stone Door,” find the Disarmers at their most adventurous taking risks that manage to pay off just about every time here. Revelations finds Shook and their band at their best across all 10 tracks.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The collective clarity of mind on cuts such as “Monaco” keeps them focused and to the point. And while both the musicianship and the material In songs such as “Last Frontier” sound distinctly of that time in the mid to late Nineties when Ride pioneered what is now described as ‘shoegaze music,” it’s also pertinent to that period when it took courage to leave the home even as it was psychically suffocating to stay inside. No question there is a tangible confidence suffusing Interplay.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The singer-songwriter’s twelfth studio album mostly sounds like 2000s-era Crow with some contemporary flourishes in the production. Crow’s diverse vocals are still solid, ranging from country twang to soulful croon and saccharine pop.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    One could quibble that the album seems just a bit static in places with little change in Lloyd’s musings and the re-airing of several staples in his repertoire, but those quibblers should listen to the sheer ecstasy in “Monk’s Dance,” the album’s brightest moments.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is consistent on the surface but a deeper listen unveils blissful tunes that come alive via unpredictable sonic twists that get better with every listen.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sam Evian created a potent LP with Plunge and keeps the album exciting by piecing together his lofty ideas and loosely tying them together via their unpredictable tendencies. By allowing even his loftiest visions to settle into his honed song craft he created a brand of pop music he can proudly call his own.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The sound quality is crystalline; remarkable considering how long this has been sitting in the vaults. The tone remains most serene for the first five and half minutes. .... The audience applauds after Jimmy Garrison’s bass solo thinking it’s over but the tenors and piano resume to take it out. This music is by contrast so ridiculously intense compared to the first half.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tigers Blood album is yet another big step forward in her evolution from critic’s darling to one of the most dependably great indie artists performing today.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Glasgow Eyes takes the band’s experimental noise pop further. The expected elements are all there, from the brooding lyrics to the droning guitars to the intricate melodies. Still, incorporating electronic elements adds extra flavor for those who’ve already played Honey’s Dead a thousand times and don’t need another one.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The second segment begins with a solo lullaby “To The End of the Earth” followed by the warm trumpet tones of Keyon Harrold in the smooth, string-imbued R&B ballad, “Alone Together” with Clark Jr. singing falsetto. The empathetic mid-tempo funky shout-out for the homeless “What About the Children” features Stevie Wonder, sharing co-writing credits, singing with the leader, as well as playing his signature clavinet and harp. This is the album’s most cohesive segment. .... Take the album at its intentions. Clark Jr. is blurring the genres, as he strives to be an important voice of hope and positivity.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album is still very much a Lenker solo project with minimal arrangements and honest songwriting but thanks to some fearlessness and a bit of patience, she can make Bright Future stand out from the rest of her solo work.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    On Happiness Bastards the brothers Crowe retreat to their safer classic rock roots with efforts that gun for mid-70’s arena swagger, falling short of the band’s prime, a touch uninspired and derivative of their best work.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    However much Julian stretches himself, however, he never abandons the warmth and fluidity that distinguishes his playing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a vital and worthy addition to Jones’ diverse catalog, surely with the potential for her tenth Grammy win.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    HOPIUMFORTHEMASSES, while not up to the band’s overall best (Psalm 69, Rio Grande Blood), is a very solid Ministry album during these insane times.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    1 2 3 4 is the perfect companion to 2017’s underrated Take Me to the Trees and a record that continues to solidify the band’s relevance four decades into their career.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Their ambitious sophomore album establishes them as a timeless act, a group of artists hellbent on saying what they want to say and nothing more. They proved they deserve every bit of praise while glossing over it to create an album so chaotic and stunning, it already feels timeless.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    El Viejo is a stunning character study of gamblers and loners moving from card game to card game, perfectly bridging modern Americana with the likes of Jerry Reed, Del McCoury and Marty Robbins with a Springsteen-like sense of storytelling in three-minute bursts.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The ever-evolving Joel Ross has taken a step back and forward at the same time. If this is your introduction to his gorgeous music, it’s an auspicious place to start that will likely lead to seeking out his previous work too.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Real Estate seamlessly ties in the esoteric with the relatable, landing on a short but powerful LP that simply asks you to question everything without demanding an immediate answer.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Throughout the nuanced Untame The Tiger, Mary Timony pushes and pulls with experimental wanderings and pop leanings, successfully delivering an engaging album that deals with grief, forlornness, and starting over with a blank slate.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Clearly, this is the crowning jewel of Hurray for the Riff Raff’s catalog, and surely their most honest, cathartic songwriting.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Compassion reveals one of today’s most fully rounded piano trios on their second foray, transportive music of the highest caliber.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, it’s a great listen in the car or for a gathering of friends, but the lyrics and diversity of sound surpass previous efforts, offering a rewarding, focused listen.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Lytle has been here before, ending his main act, but if Blu Wav is indeed the final bow from Grandaddy, it is a solid, restrained offering and a fitting coda to their catalog.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Appropriately enough, fun and adventurous are two pretty apt descriptions of Hole In My Head, a stylistically elastic record that covers folk, pop and rock all filtered through the experiences of a lifelong punk rocker.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sonic Youth is criminally underrated and fans of adventurous, guitar-driven rock will find tons to like from their wide-ranging, rich career. Walls Have Ears is just an early drop in the sonic bucket.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    TANGK is an artsy outing that is polished and honed while refusing to stay complacent and neat, their range as a band now seems limitless as IDLES release the riskiest and most rewarding music of their career.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Weird Faith is a stunning amalgamation of experiences and how a new relationship can contain just as much confusion as it does happiness. For 12 powerful tracks, Diaz navigates beautifully structured arrangements while keeping her head on a swivel, making sure everything isn’t falling apart. Weird Faith needed to be good and Diaz did more than make a good album, she penned an opus.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Attempting to unpack She Reaches Out in one listen is a futile task. This sounds like the album Wolfe was always meant to make. Nothing feels forced, a natural chaos erupts around every corner as Wolfe tip-toes around dense drums and distorted tones. Underneath the dark production are some of the best songwriting moments of Wolfe’s career.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album’s blend of thoughtful lyricism, nostalgic influences, and contemporary relevance makes it a compelling addition to the indie pop landscape in 2024. Whether you’re seeking introspective reflections or simply looking for tunes to enjoy, Harm’s Way offers a nuanced and immersive listening experience.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This release has cemented Howard as a must-hear artist as the wonderful sonic collage, soaring vocals, and insightful lyrics all come together winningly.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Last Dinner Party was able to craft an LP that combines their wide range of influences and filters them through their own artistic lens. This birthed an album that both rocks hard and emphasizes what pop song structures can become when placed in the right hands. We will all remember where we were when we first heard Prelude to Ecstasy, an album that is seemingly just the start for an innovative and daring young act.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ultimately much of the charm of Peculiar, Missouri was in its stripped-down, consistent sound. In contrast, Critterland is certainly not consistent. Rather, it’s a disparate collection of ambitious, oddball tracks that sometimes grab you instantly and sometimes take a while to sink in, but ultimately make for a compelling listen.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite being recorded in such a short burst of time – or maybe because of it – Spiel manages to be as musically diverse as it is moody, offering up a stellar intro to the band.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You don’t need to be a Ty Segall fan to appreciate the magic of Three Bells, the artist has transcended any persona attached to him to pen some of his best music to date.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sadness Sets Me Free is a bold direction for Gruff Rhys to take 25 albums in, and for the most part, these risks paid off tremendously. Rhys finds solace in the exploration of himself rather than crafting the perfect LP, giving the album a unique personality that opts for honesty over anything else.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album is not easy to digest and that is a good thing. It is a cinematic experience that requires multiple listens to truly understand the nuances of ILION.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There is no doubt that Little Rope is much more successful than those recent efforts [2019's The Center Won't Hold and 2021's Path of Wellness], but it never fully pushes the artists in new directions or completely recaptures the group's immense past magic. That said, as an outlet for one of the best duos to deal with smothering grief and loss, it is a blessing that it exists at all.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Cudi’s ninth outing features the crooning of his first few releases while harkening back even further to his mixtape days with razor-sharp flows. INSANO is effortlessly fun and enticing while still showing Cudi’s artistic progression.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He [producer Andrew Wells] manages to magnify an already impressive sound without weighing it down in over-production or slickness. The Vaccines have been a big deal back home, but Pick-Up Full of Pink Carnations could (and should) be the record that brings them that same type of recognition in the U.S.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Accompany is Nau’s best solo effort to date. The artist traverses twangy arrangements with his heart on his sleeve for a calming set of tracks. The unassuming nature of these songs emphasizes Nau’s songwriting prowess as he pens some of the best songs of his career.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Humility prevails in Before And After especially as it radiates through the ease of Young’s vocal delivery. The weathered quality his voice has acquired over the years only adds to the emotional authenticity, as does the simplicity of his harmonica playing and the vigorous strumming of acoustic guitar.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    i/o
    It is utterly mesmerizing that Gabriel can still find new and unique ways to present his art to the world and the double mixes of this album only add to the nuanced mystique of his approach. Dark-Side or Bright-Side, these 12 songs are full-body experiences with cascading melodies that pull you in every direction. i/o cements Gabriel as one of the most innovative and daring artists of his time.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Despite its historical importance in completing something of a missing link in the wide arc of Nobel Laureate’s career, The Complete Budokan 1978 is notably missing designation as an entry into the ongoing archive initiative known as The Bootleg Series. Consequently, this is one of those ever-so-rare Bob Dylan items to be taken almost strictly at face value and savored as such.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yes, it’s as good as you’d imagine.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    18 tracks of songwriting prowess set to dusty orchestrations that shake you to your core. For his first solo release in three years, Aesop Rock has never sounded hungrier as everything that makes him such a powerhouse rapper gets elevated and reimagined on what might be his best work in years.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Hadsel is a stunning set of songs that demand and deserve your undivided attention, put your phone to the side, finish your household chores, and allow Beirut’s latest to transport you to a meditative state.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The trend was fairly clear in coming, with each passing record Medford has shifted towards more mainstream sounds. Fully embracing the break-up/hook-up dance-ready pattern (with slight distortion around the edges) Medford’s efforts are ready to be sung out over large speaker stacks instead of smaller indie rock clubs.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    “Closer I Get,” which features Oh, was co-written with Ivey and one that owes to the psychedelic trip. The sonics are less dense but the lyric is heavy. .... Act II: Mind Travel is mostly dark and perhaps most representative of the psilocybin effects. Analogies, metaphors and symbolism are rampant, albeit often subtle. .... Every trip, especially a six-day one like they took, has a distinct come down period. That’s the essence of Act III: Burn Whatever’s Left.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Be assured that Martin’s songs will grow on you. You may even take away a little more insight each time through.