Glide Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 891 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 26% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 79
Highest review score: 100 We Will Always Love You
Lowest review score: 40 Weezer (Teal Album)
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 891
891 music reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Beachwood Sparks hit the cosmic canyon touchpoints and beyond on their short but sweet return to recording Across The River Of Stars.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As Barnes embarks on this new phase, Lady On The Cusp stands as a powerful, multifaceted expression of their artistic journey.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It captures the joy, complexity, and spirituality of mambo, making it both a tribute to the past and a beacon for the future. Whether you are a seasoned mambo aficionado or a newcomer to the genre, Caracoles is a must-listen, promising to lift spirits and inspire dance floors worldwide.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is a cohesive collection of tracks, personal experiences, and the broader human condition. While some may find it a bit nostalgic, the album’s raw and real approach, combined with its lighthearted moments, makes it a compelling listen.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rather than completely reinventing himself via the new moniker, Sturgill Simpson delivers more of his same idiosyncratic stylings. Passage Du Desir uses a classic Nashville base that allows ‘Johnny Blue Skies’ to springboard to more pop-oriented sounds and slightly tripped-out structures with varying degrees of success.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Like Jon Batiste’s recent effort World Music Radio, by trying to reach out to the masses, the spark that makes Lake Street Dive engagingly hard to classify has evolved into its bold shot at populist appeal.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    No wonder this eccentric ensemble continues to make albums like Valley of Abandoned Songs that reaffirm the notion great music is timeless.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Small Medium Large is a must-listen for fans of experimental and improvised music. It showcases the quintet’s remarkable synergy and individual talents, making it an album that listeners will eagerly revisit.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Into The Blue introduces us to Frazer’s ambitions of redefining the modern soul landscape while reminding us he had a hand in shaping it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s a depth to the sonics that belies the skeletal two guitars/bass/drums arrangement even as the mix highlights the aforementioned Nitzsche’s electric piano on “Winterlong”). The latter composition has only appeared before as an inclusion in the 1977 anthology Decade. But that piece of forlorn glory was nonetheless different from this one, as is also the case with a jovial rendering of “Wonderin’,” a Young original that would eventually appear on 1983’s ever-so-quirky Everybody’s Rockin’.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The beauty is in the simplicity. If nothing else, this proves that Johnny Cash is irreplaceable. It’s both refreshing and sad to hear him again.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With South Of Here and its moments of vulnerability, Rateliff and his band put out an impressive record for anyone who hadn’t been paying attention the last few years. They are clearly still just as potent as they were a decade ago.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite being their tenth album, Pond continues to push their artistic boundaries, blending innovation with their distinct psychedelic roots. Stung! stands as a testament to their enduring creativity and knack for crafting compelling music, making it an ideal soundtrack for the summer.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The original songs, written by either Gilmore or Alvin, including one co-write, are generally quite strong yet there are only six of those among these eleven. The duo made some astute cover selections but would have been better served with more original fare.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    MESTIZX stands out not just as a musical album but as an impactful cultural statement. Ferragutti and Rosaly have crafted a work that is both a tribute to their ancestors and a manifesto for future generations.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Despite the multitude of contributors, Placenta maintains a natural, cohesive flow. Niño’s role as a facilitator and catalyst is evident throughout, as he channels the creative energy of his collaborators into a unified, organic whole. .... Niño continues to push the boundaries of musical expression, and Placenta is a shining example of his visionary artistry.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Decemberists return better than ever. As It Ever Was, So It Will Be Again is the band’s longest and most rewarding album to date. The Decemberists take the art of the concept album and fill it with as many fantasy tropes as possible, creating a sonic journey that deserves your undivided attention.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Attention to sonic details and layers of instrumental touches, combined with the harmonious vocal connection, deft songwriting, and easy-rolling charm, makes Keep Me on Your Mind/See You Free Bonny Light Horseman’s most complete album to date and a joy to experience.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This terrific project has its shining moments, with a few missteps along the way, yet it will likely go down as a winner. This aggregation of talent doesn’t come along often.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    To be sure, those moments on Sam’s Place that sound like vintage Little Feat are fleeting. But there’s no denying how this unit’s bond retains an authentic feel for numbers like those of the inimitable blues poet Willie Dixon.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The band – still comprised of all three founding members – singer/guitarist Janovitz, bassist Chris Colbourn, and drummer Tom Maginnis – approach this record with the same relaxed, effortless vibe that made the trio such a consistently great act throughout the 1990s. The harmonies on “New Girl Singing” and the effortlessly cool vocals on “Recipes” and “Come Closer” sound like a band that have spent decades working together and anticipating where the song goes next.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For many, Thompson is an acquired taste. There’s little, if any, middle ground. So, while this may not attract new fans, it will more than satisfy the legions of those who stay attuned to his every move. It’s as solid as any of his recordings.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ghostface Killah’s Set The Tone is a sprawling album with risks that give some rewards and moments that uplift the whole album. While the LP dips into songs that sound forced, the authentic tracks make up for the lost time. He shows that he can keep up with any of the modern rulers of the genre. His rapping abilities and booming delivery have matured like fine wine.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album is a darkly sweet exploration of heavy themes like cancer, death, and motherhood, delivered with a newfound confidence and maturity. On News of the Universe, La Luz has crafted an album that sounds timeless yet fresh, pushing their boundaries while maintaining the hypnotic beauty that defines their music.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By design, Lives Outgrown does not have the danceable grooves of Portishead’s music, but fans of the more experimental aspects of Gibbons’s former band should love the album. The orchestral compositions and atmospheric tension paint bleak portraits well-suited for Gibbons’s somber voice. That voice is as good as ever, able to wring drama from each utterance of her poetic tales of loss.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In terms of tone, production, and energy, Neon Pill feels connected to Social Cues. And like that album, there is plenty to enjoy, even without the powerful guitars and frenzied vocals. This softer Cage still has the grooves and melodies to keep things interesting while the band gets more comfortable.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Throughout Rhumba Country, Pokey LaFarge broadens his sound, effortlessly bringing in world influences to help accentuate his retro Americana core, positively crafting one of the most enjoyable efforts of his long career.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Funeral for Justice finds the band flying high while creating songs they believe passionately in, resulting in the strongest album of Mdou Moctar’s career.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    We have two different records. Disc One blurs genres, while impassioned jazz rules Disc Two. As for dancing in the literal sense, those moments come infrequently in this massive (Kamasi knows no other way) project.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Lemon Twigs creates a meditative bliss on A Dream Is All We Know. Whether they’re making pop tunes that evoke the serenity of cherry blossom trees or bluesy rock that fills the room with heavy riffs, this project has a specific calmness that found a home in Beatles-inspired pop.