Glide Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 891 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 26% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 79
Highest review score: 100 We Will Always Love You
Lowest review score: 40 Weezer (Teal Album)
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 891
891 music reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is an album that refuses to confine to a single vibe or genre and can thus be seen as inconsistent. ... But further listens and history will show “Empath” to be an incredible neuro-spazzing journey into the mind of a musical master.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Guy
    Earle has made a gorgeous tribute, every bit as good, maybe even a shade better than TOWNES.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rendered all the more vivid by Son Volt’s combustible playing, Jay Farrar’s imagery isn’t any more likely to become dated than like the rest of this record. On the contrary, it should prove timeless and, appropriately enough, of a piece with the best work of Jay Farrar’s estimable career.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The aptly titled, Deserted finds the old rabble-rousing crew in fine form.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The mixtape feel of Side Effects makes for a disjointed overall listen, but the highpoints, smooth midsection and overall frantic nature means there are very few down moments. Longtime fans will find a lot to like as will those new to the White Denim party.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    My Finest Work Yet is an elegant musical piece, enriched by stimulating messaging.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is one of Griffin’s most introspective albums, as she continues to move in this direction. Her fans will enjoy the lyrics and her, unique passionate vocals.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    All these tracks are infused with percussion and amazing richly textured rhythmic patterns as you’ve already gleaned. Throughout, as on his other albums, Adjuah’s trumpet tone is clear and majestic sounding but it’s as if it resides on a higher plane above the rhythms and mix of acoustic and electronics taking place below. Together, the music remains unique, unlike almost anything else you’ve heard, unless it was from Adjuah or his label mate, Logan Richardson.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The ten songs are all solid, however, the restrained feeling of the record, especially early on, results in an album more one-note than it should be. EX Hex still rock but urgency is primarily absent, keeping It’s Real from truly ripping.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s “out there” but most of it is remarkably accessible, especially the raucous “Summon the Fire.” It’s transcendent music that relies on electronics, notably heavy use of reverb and tape delay, but Hutchings is a fiery sax player who blows aggressively while safeguarding the melody.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Haunting re-workings of “Private Hell” from the Jam’s 1979 Setting Sons resides next to solo favorites such as “You Do Something To Me,” both of which fit seamlessly into a set overtly and deliberately lush from its very start on “One Bright Star;” subsequently book-ended by “White Horses,” the program concludes with the appropriately emotional, but decidedly unsentimental flourish of “May Love Travel With You.”
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sky Blue ranks with Townes’ Live at the Old Quarter, a similarly intimate album, long regarded as one of his best. This, for many, will be more intriguing as it shows Townes laying down his tunes with sheer confidence and dripping emotion.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It is a flood of art at its most naked that won’t relent until you are submersed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This impressive debut record captures the sound of some of London’s most prominent trailblazers at the top of their game. If this is your introduction to London’s current jazz sound, then it’s a good one.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s weird, ambitious and at times straight-up absurd; even as it settles for a vaguely more accessible and hook-heavy sound than previous efforts. It’s also, curiously, a bit of a slow starter, the songs getting well and truly better as it goes on.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    White Stuff may not be as experimental as some of their past efforts, but it is an incredibly enjoyable dip into the dumpster of dirty grooving rock and roll whose sound is surprisingly appropriate thirty years after their formation.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The beauty of this creative work is that you’ll hear different sounds almost every time you play it. The melodies are infectious, and the playing is immensely inspired. It’s a risky concept that succeeds brilliantly.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a fun and impressive album showing you don’t have to be a young American to make a killer blues rock album.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There will never be another Ray Charles. He sounds just as amazing now as he did 55-56 years ago. This is music one can’t revisit too often.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s much more textural [than 2015's Undertow], drawing a lot from new wave and shoegaze, with drummer Rory Loveless (Eoin’s brother) always luring the song back to those rock roots. The combination works and keeps the album from sounding like an 80’s tribute record.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s an effective blend superior to earlier attempts at versatility, as on the Bright Lights EP and, during the aforementioned “What About Us,” comparable to the absorption of musical elements present on previous full-length studio albums like Blak And Blu.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    American Love Song is classic Bingham.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The gauntlet is thrown down directly at the start and while the following songs are all strong, nothing tops this dynamite performance.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An LP as disciplined as it is versatile.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ellis proves to be a grand pop master. This, albeit somewhat surprising, is his most cohesive album to date.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hayes Carll has made some great records. This is his best one.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The songs vary in songwriting quality but you can’t argue with the performances. Everything she puts on the album is elevated.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though the album doesn’t really venture into new territory, the quality of songs on Tip of the Sphere maintain the same consistency of quality as his past albums. It is an album that is bound to please both diehard fans and newcomers alike.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At 12 tracks long, and finishing just under 37 minutes, Sunshine Rock is relentless. It’s heavy without being dark. It’s catchy without being light. And while the bones of the album are Mould and his electric guitar, he has very carefully added different touches, like strings and keyboards, that enhance the tracks without being distracting. Sunshine Rock is an album worth hearing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Whatever way you slice it, Deer Tick’s “leftovers” are better than the main courses of many other bands. This compilation is an attempt to show fans a more vulnerable side of the band, the ones that would choose the mayonnaise.