Glide Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 888 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 26% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 79
Highest review score: 100 We Will Always Love You
Lowest review score: 40 Weezer (Teal Album)
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 888
888 music reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Enter into Rajan with zero expectations and allow Night Beats to whisk you off on a mind-expanding journey that blends genres while keeping the unfiltered creativity of Danny Lee Blackwell at the center of it all.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Though controversial at the time, this music, experimental in nature, still resonates with intensity, spirituality, and unbridled power, a clear steppingstone to Trane’s Classic Quartet, and a ‘must have’ for Trane collectors.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ochoa’s music will inevitably have you smiling and perhaps reaching back to the Buena Vista Social Club recording and its various offshoots.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    “Alice in Bluegrass” highlights the skills of her fine band while the haunting “Stranger Things” is both a vocal tour de force and a stunning dobro turn from Douglas. Tuttle is at her playful best, promoting marijuana legalization in the brief, upbeat “Down Home Dispensary.”
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The combination of Wall’s vivid imagery and his sense of tone gives these songs a cinematic feeling, Little Songs is just as much a novel-turned-movie as it is an LP. Colter Wall has another terrific record to add to his discography, one that cements him as Country’s next legend.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    “The View” is another near-solo track that legitimizes Lukas Nelson’s songwriting skills, as well as the understated savvy of Promise of the Real. Would that such numbers be the rule rather than the exception on the album? Or that the band quintet stretched out longer and more often than they do over the course of the twelve selections.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Gabriels wear their influences on their sleeves, they are able to melt them down to form their own forward-thinking take that is as free and courageous as the genre has sounded in a long time.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album finds a comfortable middle ground between the warmth of your own bed after a long vacation and the anxiety of entering a new era in your life. She deploys just enough ambiance to keep us listening without distracting from her overall message, allowing the hushed melodies and simplistic arrangements to thrive under the all-encompassing creativity of its creator.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    We have one of the best in their series, one that sounds like one infectiously grooving continuous track.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s no better modern bluesman on the scene today than Birchwood. He consistently delivers the goods and Exorcist is his latest adventurous chapter..
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Stinson and Robert have turned down the raucousness and deliver more contemplative efforts, while still experimenting with sound and instrumentation. The stakes feel lower by design as if two musicians are just having a good time with each other as Cowboys in the Campfire allow Wronger to chill along.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The long closer of “The Real Thing” is drawn out as the group goes for a big and cathartic finale, yet never fully breaks on through. That said, there is a lot to like on Emotional Contracts, as Deer Tick returns to the indie rocking fold, proving that they will travel wherever the song takes them.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is indeed as animated as we’ve heard Lucinda in some time. Her articulation and her songs are strong, while buoyed by excellent backing musicians, vocalists, and superb production values.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These songs touch on solitude, fading love, trying to grow up and some bleak topics, but their sweet sound together makes listening to them a joy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Beggar is a challenging listen over its two-hour run time, but the sonic soundscapes SWANS create throughout deliver what the band set out to do; juxtapose the beautiful and grotesque while stretching out their droning sound to the breaking point.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In the end, Lloyd Cole makes the title of On Pain sound ironic. It’s as if the eight tracks and thirty-seven minutes are intended as an antidote to the psychic turbulence pervading the world at large in 2023.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is revelatory that on such cuts–like the rest, ranging from five to eight minutes in duration–Metheny employs his instincts as much as his technique. The delicate balance of those two elements is nothing less than remarkable on Dream Box.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Cable Ties use their intriguing mix of punk, rock, and post-punk dance vibes with an assured delivery throughout the powerful All Her Plans, breaking out to a larger audience with committed songwriting, driven playing, and compelling vocal styles.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Gov’t Mule’s willingness to step outside its collective comfort zone here is clearly not without its shortfalls. Still, that very courage augurs well for the celebration of their thirtieth anniversary next year.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album opens with the tone-shifting, unsettling, pessimistic “Obscenery” which sees modern love as unsentimental and everything doomed around grunge-laden guitars, random classical violin breaks and crashing drums; interesting ideas which never fully lock-in. Better is the driving, straight-ahead rock of “Paper Machete” complete with an excellent distorted solo, the angular “Emotion Sickness” that deploys a catchy FM radio-friendly hook, and “Negative Space” which juxtaposes sexy grooving bass during the verses and big clanging noise breaks for the choruses.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is eminently funky. That sound works well for a while but begins to wear thin, rescued in the latter half by tracks such as “Concrete Mind,” “Not Gonna Waste My Love” and the superb closer “It’s Alright,” which do the best job of depicting LaVette’s endearing, pour-it-all-out and leave-nothing-on-the-floor-vocals. Of course, there’s a side benefit too – Randall Bramblett is likely to expand his number of followers as a result.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While the album boasts numerous contemporary jazz and innovative artists, it’s a mashup of many Black music styles. This writer gives the edge to R&B and African-tinged tunes but there’s so much to digest here that we may hear it a bit differently each time it plays.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Heaven Is A Junkyard marks the most powerful and personal album from Powers yet.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Trying on outfits/styles, genres/sounds is all second nature for Lewis and while there are clear country touches throughout Joy’All, Lewis manages to make them her own, evolving, writing, and singing with a sense of palpable happiness and freedom.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ambient yet dense, Space Heavy is an album that requires multiple listens to fully grasp, with each listen revealing a new layer of abstract rock that makes the album such a bold and enticing sonic step for Archy Marshall.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band found the perfect balance of what they know and what they hope to become, making O Monolith a considered sophomore effort that proves Squid’s placement as one of the most exciting bands in years.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Lyrically, this is mixed but has its strong points. Few write with his kind of insight. Yet, musically it fails to generate enough sparks with most of the songs stuck in similar mid-tempo modes. The true ballads are strong.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite coming in at 16 tracks – normally a bloated affair for an album – the band’s tendency to careen from one song to the next at breakneck speed, keeping most tracks to about two-and-a-half minutes allows Rancid to hold the listener’s attention until the very last distorted chord rings out.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Bunny deserves credit, like each Beach Fossils album, for challenging an aspect of Payseur’s process, even if it was less effective this time around.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This man long ago taught himself to recognize the lasting value in a good song and here, over the course of some fifty minutes, he deftly applies those lessons to an unusual range of his very own.