Glide Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 890 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 26% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 79
Highest review score: 100 We Will Always Love You
Lowest review score: 40 Weezer (Teal Album)
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 890
890 music reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite coming in at 16 tracks – normally a bloated affair for an album – the band’s tendency to careen from one song to the next at breakneck speed, keeping most tracks to about two-and-a-half minutes allows Rancid to hold the listener’s attention until the very last distorted chord rings out.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Bunny deserves credit, like each Beach Fossils album, for challenging an aspect of Payseur’s process, even if it was less effective this time around.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This man long ago taught himself to recognize the lasting value in a good song and here, over the course of some fifty minutes, he deftly applies those lessons to an unusual range of his very own.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her artistic identity is on full display with each individual talent reaching a height we haven’t seen from Bully, and it appears there is no ceiling to hold her back.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Along with bassist Alan Anton, the band’s lineup has not changed at all since their 1986 debut and, thankfully, though they’ve grown as musicians and songwriters over the decades, the core of the band’s sound is the same as it ever was.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Folds is past aiming for radio airplay and mass appeal and focused more on creating experimental songs that appeal to his creativity. And sometimes those moments of inspiration take him back to the beginning and sound a lot like he did when he first started out.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Cleaner and lighter than past efforts, The Murlocs Calm Ya Farm is their best full album yet as the good time sounds flow like free wine at a late-night afterparty.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They sound even more urgent now and, of course, Lanois’s production values have further enhanced the band’s captivating sound.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The slow tempos are fine in doses but that novelty wears off quickly. More variations in tempo would likely work better. When we get to the closer “It’s All in the Game” it just seems that Rickie Lee is stuck in that molasses-like groove. She’s intent on being a torch singer and she’s damn good at it although it takes plenty of hutzpah to take on the Great American Songbook.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Showcase[s] improvements from the highly publicized 2019 album, Metttavolution while seeming humble and curious. Rodrigo y Gabriela have never cowered away from the challenge of funneling their influence and experiences into one solid format but on this new album, they took their traditional style of doing so and implemented a sense of urgency that gives the album a certain zestfulness that is infectious.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    So unassuming an offering it may very well sneak onto more than a few ‘Best of ’23’ lists, this LP certainly deserves such placement. Its forty-some minutes contain more than a few of those deeply stirring moments only truly great records possess.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This meeting of varying experiments is at the core of Wait Til I Get Over, Jones is able to challenge himself while still keeping the narrative of the LP intact, an expedition that could’ve given us countless results. What we got was an album that sits in the middle ground of the past and future, toying with the present in order to give the listener a full experience rather than a simple collection of songs.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    That! Feels Good! nimbly catapults Ware from being beholden to What’s Your Pleasure?, to cementing herself as one of the most agile and important dance artists working today. ... A punchier and more immediate album than What’s Your Pleasure?, slicker and far funkier, but equally iconoclastic.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His soft voice and natural sense of melody give these songs enough musical prowess to keep up with the best while still seeming innocent and green to the world around them. Maltese’s vulnerability makes him one of the more relatable and pure artists working today and his fourth album further proves that we are far from hearing the last and best music Maltese has to offer.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Taj has a one-of-a-kind personality. and the arrangements are solid in what potentially could be a great album. However, although the background vocalists are not on every track, their presence on enough of them mars the album. For whatever reason, they just don’t match the vibe and are incompatible with Taj’s vocals. His phrasing and Simon’s arrangements are the real pluses.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    First Two Pages of Frankenstein feels like a return to The National we fell in love with 20-plus years ago while still being creatively ambitious and providing new context to a band who never fears away from putting themselves out there.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ritter delivers a thoughtful, impressionistic work that is almost abstract and direct in equal measures. Yet, it’s difficult to absorb in just one listen, or to even single out individual songs. His well-crafted work is in essence a symphony with subtle treasures, both musically and lyrically, within the movements.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She covers emotional and relatable ground with a fun blend of Americana and pop music. She also weaves personal experiences throughout the songs. ... That mix of the deeply personal with the relatable is a powerful combination.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The combination of strong, ear-catching musicianship, confessional in-the-moment lyrics, and engaging vocals makes Blondshell’s debut an invigorating success.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though the album is unequivocally emotionally rich, with most songs building to vibrant climaxes after mellow beginnings, as a whole it lacks the power, swagger, and singalong aspects of vintage soul records.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s little sense of genuine band unity on Defiance Part 1. But ultimately that’s no serious liability because as the focal point of the project, Ian Hunter evinces a stubborn independence that overrides this album’s slight blemishes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The recording of Somewhere Under The Rainbow (by Pete Long who also contributes an essay on the four-page insert) radiates palpable resolve and despair in almost equal measure, plus an air of genuine catharsis, all this despite the murky audio quality remaining in the wake of mixing and mastering by the artist himself and long-time technical collaborator Niko Bolas.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Neil Young is having a bit too much fun to sustain anything genuinely intense over the course of these nearly two-hours on stage and in rehearsal with his cohorts. Still, it’s hard not to become caught up in the joy of it all before it’s over, because songs like “I Am A Dreamer” are infectious by their very lack of affectation. Both of these two-CD ‘Official Bootlegs,’ each in its own way, reaffirms that the seeming vagaries of Neil Young’s career are not random anomalies, but rather a pattern of purposeful behavior.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    72 Seasons is an impressive metal album, not just for a band 11 albums and 41 years into its career, but for anyone. It packs a punch and doesn’t let up on the assault for over an hour of menacing guitars and head-banging rhythms. In the end, that’s what we want from a Metallica album, and that’s what 72 Seasons delivers.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At times the album succumbs to bloated overload, the occasional instrumental placeholders like “Sultry Air” and “Movements of Time“ are not necessary on an already long-running album while the AOR pop of “Slow Days” feels a bit like running in place with fine, yet dull, overall results. However, the band’s chilling-on-a-space-age-beach attitude also results in some grand successes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    [“Rushin’ River Valley” is] up there with the solid indie pop mid-tempo “Waking Up in Los Angeles” and the charming “Tacoma,” (see two more geographical references!) as some of the record’s early highlights. Those tracks serve as a counterweight for some of the mellower numbers on the album.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In more ways than one, these renditions fulfill the duo’s ambition to avoid just cranking out the hits.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is a freer flowing record that admittedly takes a few sessions to really stick, but once it does, you realize that it just might be – song for song – their strongest album yet.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Never shy with their political activism, Plastic Eternity is a battle cry for those who share the band’s beliefs. For those who don’t, it’s still a fun alternative album that channels political fury into a fiery collection of aggressive rock.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Except for a few tracks, London Brew, imaginative as it is, doesn’t evoke the level of energy that Miles’ original did. For all we know, though, that could be purposeful as this cast clearly put their own stamp on this project.