Glide Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 891 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 26% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 79
Highest review score: 100 We Will Always Love You
Lowest review score: 40 Weezer (Teal Album)
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 891
891 music reviews
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    An album that redefines collaboration on a spiritual level. ... 12 poetically moving pieces of art that focus on emotions and environments most would attempt to ignore. The Record hit our speakers with high expectations, and not a single second let us down.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Price of Progress as a whole prove The Hold Steady is in a great space, shifting, experimenting, and willing to try almost anything while still delivering their brand of well-worn, classic rock-influenced sound.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Apart from McLorin’s Salvant’s singular voice and compelling musical arrangements, it’s her courage and imagination for such heady projects that set her apart from any contemporary singer.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even without Bejar, there are enough pop hooks and interesting melodies to live up to The New Pornographers’ high standard.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This feels like Tumor’s masterpiece, an opus that has been laying dormant deep in the artist’s creativity waiting to be freed at the perfect time. They pieced together a tracklist that, despite the frantic nature of these songs, stays consistently chaotic even in its most mellow moments.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Messages of love and peace, so prevalent during the late sixties and early seventies come through stellar arrangements of “The Creator Has a Master Plan,” originally associated with Leon Thomas and Pharaoh Sanders as well as the traditional gospel chestnut, “Wade in the Water.” ... This recording will likely still emerge as one of the year’s most important.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band crafted their most personal and revealing album to date by allowing themselves to play with minimalism in a way that creates an atmosphere of honesty. Fantasy has M83 at their most fearless.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    V
    Despite the otherworldly talent displayed on the album, there is an element of humanity hidden in there. By simply relaying their life story through whooshing production and swooning melodies, UMO created their most personal yet most relatable album to date.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The resulting unwieldy quadruple album manages to be overwhelming and underwhelming at the same time.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ["Goodnight" is] one of the strongest album closers heard recently and takes the edge off the hard-hitting statements that make up the bulk of this provocative, lay-it-all-out-there effort.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Death Valley Girls have softened musically with each release, adding more pop influences, and digging more into the spiritual hippy cosmos of the we-are-all-in-this-together vibe. They also have continually improved, as Islands in the Sky is their best album to date.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There is a comforting steadiness and calmness to Moen’s vocals that draw in the listener regardless of what he’s singing about; the songs have a tendency to be both haunting and melancholy at times yet also reassuring – not an easy feat to pull off.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a consistent work of songs gestating over many years, Radical Romantics is a remarkable composite of Dreijer as they exist in 2023 and of the emotions that brought them here.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Most of the time Morrison plays the songs straight, some with different arrangements and a few with lyrical twists. ... This music is well-designed for live performance and early reviews of the shows are highly favorable. However, as an album listening experience, the weight of so many background vocalists with call and response or echoes in every chorus on these tracks becomes wearisome.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Needless to say, long-term fans of this band should find The Hypnogogue a boon to their devotion. But it’s also true this latest work would function effectively as an introduction to this rock and roll institution from Down Under.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These songs find her shaping her thoughts on motherhood, romance, the universe, and death into some of the most accessible music of her career, telling the tales of our bodies and what comes after in a mesh of psychedelic funk and earworm hooks.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unlike the last two albums, there really isn’t really a strong theme to this record aside from the rowdiness of many of the tracks here (the slow tempo “Drunken Moon” and “She Leads Me” being the two big exceptions). But after a couple of strong yet musically restrained records, it’s fun to hear Lucero tapping into their more raucous side again.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Food for Worms features shame’s strongest music in the pantheon of their short discography. They hit a new creative stride through the album’s dense textures and complex structure, allowing them to shape otherworldly arrangements for their evolved songwriting.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Allowing themselves to become fully engulfed by their own creation created a creative energy that bursts through the LP, conjuring up a listening experience that requires you to close your eyes and surrender to the uncompromising vision of Gorillaz.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Through its 10 tracks, we are introduced to an uncompromising artist whose trust in themselves creates moments of sonic bliss. The way they are able to bounce between tempos and moods with ease gives the album its colorful personality and shines a light on the writing talents of Miss Grit.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is one powerful, deep dose of positivity, purposely overstated, with the whole bigger than any single song. Whether any of us need the tidal wave of healing power DeMent summons may be debatable but the album brings an indelible, lasting quality that few others achieve.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One of the best bands playing today just keeps striding forward with confidence as Desires Pathway is yet another successful offering from the Screaming Females. The New Jersey trio continues to shift and create new sounds while keeping their hard driving style intact.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    7s
    Tare achieved something magical on 7s. The collection of music presented on the album changes with every listen, almost like watching a plant grow. The more your surrender yourself to the album’s intensity, the more you find solace in the hecticness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chambers is challenging us to hear the connections between the pieces, which are not always readily apparent. Yet, the harmonics, textures, and fluidity of the sound remain appealing throughout.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pollen has a subtle beauty to its short, 32-minute runtime. The layered instruments and crooned vocals are steeped in the kind of love that is anchored in more than a decade of marriage. As such, it might not have the passionate peaks and valleys of a brief fling, but it makes up for that in its mature craftsmanship and shared vision of creating and maintaining the art.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The power pop of Quasi is awash in distortion throughout the album, keeping hips shaking, heads bobbing and nerves rattling.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    “Even the Sparrow,” however, leans more directly into gospel, with the unison lines of the sax and electric violin creating blissful harmonics. Yes, even this one explodes into shrill, combustible sequences as it evolves. These ten pieces are a preamble of sorts to the explosive closer, “Fear Not.” ... Yet the six sound seekers find an anthemic melody, after a beginning of restless chaos, reaching a surprisingly peaceful resolution.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Tubs’ debut album Dead Meat is a solid effort that showcases the band’s energy, attitude, and ability to blend punk aggression with melodic hooks. Fans of punk and rock music will find plenty to enjoy on this album, with its driving drums, snarling guitars, and impassioned vocals. The band is not afraid to take on difficult and controversial subjects and their lyrics are biting, politically-charged and true to their roots. It’s a must-listen for anyone who appreciates punk and rock music.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A stunningly effective experience. ... The album, though emotionally weighty, offers a testament to moving on and surviving and makes for thoroughly unforgettable listen.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Collaboration is a good color on Bass Drum of Death as Barrett looking to outside opinions allowed for his ideas to take full form and provide us with 12 tracks of unfiltered rock with enough melody to plant itself firmly in your psyche and remind you of what album to throw on when you need to get lost in a cloud of harmonious garage rock.