Glide Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 888 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 26% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 79
Highest review score: 100 We Will Always Love You
Lowest review score: 40 Weezer (Teal Album)
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 888
888 music reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite it being one of their shortest albums, their feral-like energy continues to demand your attention for the full 40 minutes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While their debut, The Power And The Glory, is not necessarily treading new ground, it is still a remarkably satisfying collection of straight-ahead college rock songs. Mantione’s vocals are solid, but it’s the unexpected lyrical turns that almost all of the songs take that make the band so compelling.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These songs have a light-hearted nature to them that is overtly pleasant without sounding like they’re trying to be. While this approach doesn’t leave much room for experimentation, it does leave us with a consistent, exciting, easily enjoyable album that toes the line between spacious ambiance and robust arrangements.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Through its simplicity, Five Easy Hot Dogs achieved a level of beauty that redefines Demarco as a musician. Instead of relying on cheeky guitar tones and whispering vocal melodies, Demarco created a project that expresses his diversity without it feeling forced.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Musically the band takes some really big swings here on songs like “Hell On Earth,” easily one of their best tracks in years, and the beautifully soaring “Living In the Grey”; and those experiments almost always pay off. Impressively, the band pairs those musical gambles with some of their most personal lyrics yet, singing about fatherhood, expectations of masculinity and showing vulnerability. This new creative spark and lyrical enlightenment makes for Circa Wave’s most ambitious record so far in a career that is already pretty notable.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Rick Neilsen’s stage patter has the earlier, maniacal tone, Robin Zander’s vocals are sublime, Tom Peterrson’s bass sounds mammoth and Mr. Bun E. Carlos proves why he is truly irreplaceable. ... To quote the band’s paean to the faithful, Fan Club, these four discs are truly the sound of “four kings and an army strong.”
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While perhaps not a major cultural statement, Every Loser is an extremely secure album for the legendary mercurial artist to deliver this late in his career.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Four stands among the tallest in Frisell’s storied catalog and should be destined for classic status.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If MIKE had released Beware of the Monkey a few months earlier, a lot of the “Best Albums of the Year” lists you’ve been reading would look a lot different. He gracefully navigates a new season in his life through vibrant instrumentals and heartfelt poetry that is as direct as it is artistically ambitious.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Me/And/Dad has its share of some genuine knee-slappers, such as “Way Downtown” and “Dig A Little Deeper (In The Well)”, the album ultimately draws its strength from the emotionally charged performances heard on some of the more somber material. ... Me/And/Dad shines thanks to its stripped-down arrangements of traditional material that serve as a welcome counterpoint to the progressive-fueled musical fireworks that often accompany Strings’ live shows.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Cuts like “Shakin’ All Over” illustrate how Petty and the Heartbreakers are individually and collectively rediscovering themselves as players and singers as they move out of their shared comfort zone. Even when the ensemble is sharing the stage, they transcend mere showmanship to depict their recommitment to the roots of their music.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wand is most at home onstage, and Spiders in the Rain does a proper job of delivering the group’s unique mix of noise/psych/jam/shoegaze/alternative rock to those who have yet to experience them in concert as well as those who want to relive the majesty.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As on the previous record, these tracks are pieced together and arranged by bandleader Stu Mackenzie from group jams before being augmented with overdubs and vocals, and on Denim the band sound even less encumbered with the idea of traditional songcraft – though they manage to craft a great pair of songs here.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    We’ve dubbed Lloyd a major spiritual force. There is nothing here to dissuade us from that. This could be arguably even a higher form of spirituality. It’s just a whole different trio offering than the previous two that shows the endless creativity and versatility of the inimitable Lloyd.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Weyes Blood’s And In the Darkness, Hearts Aglow is a revelatory baroque pop album forged in these recent chaotic days.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This forty-fifth studio album of Neil Young’s may not rank as one of his greatest, but it may well be the most true-to-life effort he’s ever released.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though Love Songs For Losers has many of the familiar markings of the band, the album finds the trio at their most experimental, diverse in subjects and sound – all while still sounding very much like a Lone Bellow album.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fertita pulls from all his edgy influences fortuitously throughout this solo self-titled debut, as Tropical Gothclub shakes with an infectious buzzing energy in line with Eagles of Death Metal and Them Crooked Vultures.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While the album is generally melancholy, he is able to squeeze in a full spectrum of emotions around the same topic, allowing the album to flow naturally lyrically while Mann’s arrangement work provides new dimensions and textures, creating an undeniably smooth listening experience.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its seamless collection of earworm melodies and heady grooves make for a pretty compelling argument that it was well worth the wait.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Murlocs continue their steeped-in acid look back at the 60’s Nuggets-inspired offerings on the convincing Rapscallion.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Car definitely keeps with the trajectory that Arctic Monkeys have been following since the release of Whatever People… and Favorite Worst Nightmare. Depending on what your outlook on the band’s releases has been will determine whether you think The Car is in keeping with an upward or downward trajectory.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    [Sloan] have certainly built up a solidly loyal following over the years but have inexplicably never been huge outside of their native Canada. Steady likely won’t do much to change that but is certain to make even the most casual fans of the band happy.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Stumpwork is bright and more exploratory than what came before, the result of a band pushing the boundaries of its sound farther than just about any of their peers without losing track of their trademark lockstep groove.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Robyn Hitchcock’s easy-going sense of whatever-will-be-will-be floats through the varied compositions on SHUFFLEMANIA! as the artist (with a little help from his friends) slips and slides around his Beatles inspired pop offerings.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Component System With The Auto Reverse has OME at his best, whether he is diving into his personal life or simply crafting clever rap verses, the seasoned artist hits it out of the park every chance he gets.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As an album from a constantly evolving musician, one who is often as confounding as he is exploratory, Foreverandevermore is approachable in its bleak outlook. Eno captures the sound most definitive to himself, evokes his best work in the process, and manages to weave something of a concept album into the mix, which makes it one of his most fulfilling albums of the new millennium.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The real joy in this album is found in the shared musical language that’s exhibited across its seven tracks. Instruments fold into each other and each player seems to relish the chance to explore these sonic spaces with true abandon together. These might not be King Gizzard’s tightest, or most immediately memorable pieces of songcraft, but their creativity and kinship is on full display here, which is ultimately what this band has always been all about (that and reminding us of impending heat death).
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The perfect backyard, sunset watching summer folk album, Rolling Holy Golden faces west as Bonny Light Horseman enjoy those tender fleeting moments while they float through our collective consciousnesses, smiling the whole time.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The consistently heart-wrenching lyrics of Mercer combined with Danger Mouse’s ability to craft luxurious instrumentals give Into The Blue its colorful personality. Within the 40-minute run-time of the album, the duo explores new territory while Mercer’s poetic songwriting keeps Danger Mouse’s spaced-out instrumentals grounded.