Hartford Courant's Scores

  • Music
For 517 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Sound Of Silver
Lowest review score: 20 Carry On
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 12 out of 517
517 music reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Demolished Thoughts stands strong as an intriguing entry in an already eclectic catalog, even without peeking behind the curtain.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Lady Gaga has made a quintessential pop album with Born This Way.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They've recaptured the brash cheek of their best work on Hot Sauce Committee Part Two, which the trio has elected to release before the "delayed indefinitely" Part One.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Skip the heavily lifting and split the record into smaller chunks, which makes it easier appreciate the songs for the obvious care that Eisold has put into them.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite a slew of hit singles and eye-popping sales figures, Britney Spears has never released an album as coherent from start to finish as her latest, Femme Fatale.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's an assured effort from the very start.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a record with a folky, sometimes psychedelic edge, but it's never self-indulgent or less than focused. In fact, Smoke Ring for My Halo is persuasive evidence that Vile has come fully into his own as a songwriter and musician.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's been a long time since Radiohead made records with an eye toward anything more than satisfying the band's own creative impulses, if it ever did. Those who are prepared to stick it out, though, may well find The King of Limbs worth the wait.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At its core, The Party Ain't Over is a strong testament to Jackson's enduring talent, and White's vision for how best to deploy it. Even though Jackson was never actually gone, it's a pleasure having her back.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a loose, easy-rolling centerpiece to an album that shows, after several fussier efforts, how effectively the Decemberists can make use of open space in their music. The King is Dead--long live the king.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Lady Killer doesn't have the same tightly focused future-soul sound as Green's other project, Gnarls Barkley, but that gives the singer a chance to show his wider ranging musical appetites with elements of vintage R&B, irresistible pop and even a couple of sleek spy-movie riffs.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Promise demonstrates how wide-ranging Springsteen's musical interests and abilities were when he was 27.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Like many of Kanye's brainstorms, it's a crazy idea -- and like many of Kanye's crazy ideas, it works.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The wistful tunes are the big draw here. They're masterworks of pop production, with Robyn's wispy voice weaving through spinning swirls of sugary synthesizers and hip-twitching beats that make it all but impossible to sit still.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's an odd sort of talent, making joyless slogs out of music that is supposed to be fun and exuberant, but The Beginning is at its core a shrine to forced joviality, and that's no fun at all.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's provided great fodder as devotees of celebrity gossip speculate on who, exactly, she's singing about, but with Swift's endearing appeal as a singer and ever-growing skill as a songwriter, Speak Now makes for great listening, too.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A charming collection of breezy, hook-filled pop songs.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The circuitous path to success has done the band good: it's given Brown and company time enough to develop a winsome country-rock style without undue meddling from the major-label mediocracy, and it shows on You Get What You Give.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Produced by Wilco leader Jeff Tweedy, Staples' latest is a joyous celebration of life and faith on traditional gospel songs and tunes by Tweedy, Allen Toussaint, John Fogerty, Randy Newman and Staples' father, Roebuck "Pops" Staples.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    By the end of Teenage Dream--hell, halfway through--it's apparent that neither Perry nor her collaborators had much to say that was meaningful, or even particularly interesting. It sure didn't stop them from saying it anyway.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Despite the catchy moments, The Orchard is not a distinctive record. In fact, aside from showcasing Duquette's inventive, propulsive drum work, the only chance the album takes is that it doesn't really take any chances.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The tunes are among the most musically diverse the band has recorded so far, with buoyant piano pop undercut by an air of melancholy on the opening title track, glittering beds of synthesizers on "Sprawl II," churning, punk simplicity in the guitars on "Month of May" and a propulsive rhythm driving "Half Light II (No Celebration)," layers of vocal harmonies and moaning strings floating atop the relentless beat.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Mostly, though, the album is noisy jumble of competing sounds and ideas, none of which ever develops fully enough to make MAYA into as cohesive a statement as her first two albums.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though understated compared to their predecessors, these songs are smart and catchy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    His vocals here are mostly murmurs, and the musical accompaniment, though skillful throughout, lacks the punch of his previous albums.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    He picks solid songs with themes just about anyone can relate to, and he sings them with a hint of twang in his warm voice. His songs feel like home, and his latest, Twang, is no different.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although the alter-ego suggests that Banks would be happy to keep his own name out of it, the fact is that Julian Plenti is ... Skyscraper is the truest reflection of Banks' musical impulses, which don't always shine through in the democracy that is Interpol.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The New Milford transplant has released a slew of solo albums, including the excellent new collection Man Overboard.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's a collection packed with groaning clich├ęs and calculated banality, and while that's not so different from plenty of music in any era, Leave This Town is so formulaic, it could have come from a laboratory at DuPont, where they make plastic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    No one ought to begrudge Tweedy his hard-won peace of mind, but there's less of the emotional, or musical, turbulence here that made for such compelling listening on previous Wilco records.