Launch.com's Scores

  • Music
For 354 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Live In New York City
Lowest review score: 20 Results May Vary
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 12 out of 354
354 music reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There is some real grime and songwriting grit in these songs, that while outfitted in lush production, faux-soul effects and banal duets, rock harder than anything Sting has offered in ages.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Life For Rent breaks no new ground, and while the publicity machine proffers a failed Dido romance as its inspiration, the album retains her debut's style yet without its wonderfully miserable substance.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rockist textures and lush dreamscapes that could very well be the Cocteau Twins take on heavy metal.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rufus is self-effacing and clever enough to keep the music from becoming totally insipid.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Grace includes lots of atmospheric touches that are two steps beyond country and miles too ethereal to call pop.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While Elvis is quite the crooner, an entire album of achy-breaky heartache is too much for the casual Costello listener to bear.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    No, Fred, the results don't vary. The results are consistent throughout your new album--consistently crappy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Slogging through this stuff is so soul consuming that by the time you get to "Too High," with its pompous rock opera orchestral arrangement and portentous drums, you'll just surrender and let Dave have his way with you.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Combining the two discs might have insured an unbeatable follow-up; however, the flawed, fascinating separation reveals what makes this partnership so special.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Stellastarr stand out from 2003's even-newer-new-wave-of-new-wave pack in that they manage to borrow from the suddenly-cool-again decade of Pacman and parachute pants without sounding like they've spent the last six months sequestered in a loft watching VH1's I Love The '80s documentary series in a constant loop.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Hard rock that is neither hard nor rock.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Offering musical redemption for the New South's old hang-ups, Deliverance delivers.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This time around, she and her collaborators have also figured out how to blow away the incense without losing her mystique.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    His big voice and big, good-vs-evil themes now need the gold lame beats of Grand Champ to deliver one last howling high.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Permission To Land is actually good enough to motivate more than a few curious, intrepid listeners to give their dusty old Dokken albums another spin.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Reality is easily one of his most emotionally transparent albums.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By muting Tool's over-the-top attack, Keenan has more time to devote to deepening the textures throughout.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Horn's work is so effective that it takes several listens before you notice how often Seal's songwriting depends on it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The elements of free-jazz, mopey techno, and hypnotic riff rock find familiar combinations as Pierce's peace, love, and drugs philosophy takes on a perfunctory turn.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is still an excellent band composed of three excellent musicians who can produce one hell of a noise.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is 33 minutes of pure pop bliss; there isn't a bad song or a missed opportunity anywhere here.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    You'd be hard-pressed to ask much more from a record.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album often revisits the troubled vibe of her early days, in sound if not lyrically.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Features a more worldly sound and outlook.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What Clones proves, beyond its certain hits, is that the Neptunes have to be considered alongside the handful of great artists (Bowie, Prince, et al) who kept pushing boundaries as they pushed up the charts.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Always undervalued as a songwriter, Franti reassembles his familiar building blocks of rock, reggae, and vintage R&B into the funkiest, most inviting neighborhoods he's yet created.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    This is classic underachieving at its peak.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's absolutely nothing revolutionary about what these guys are pulling, but they synthesize a gritty staccato new wave attack with the arrogant, swaying machismo of old school boogie with an authority far beyond their few years.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Perhaps the formula is wearing just a tad thin. Nevertheless, it's always foolish not to celebrate melody.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While they still tackle the same young person themes you expect--girls, loneliness, girls--they do so with professional aplomb.