New York Magazine (Vulture)'s Scores

For 1,655 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Queen
Lowest review score: 0 Arthur
Score distribution:
1,655 movie reviews
  1. Séraphine is one of the most evocative films about an artist I've ever seen--and in its treatment of madness one of the least condescending.
  2. Sheridan’s actors work with their intellects fully engaged--and they engage us on levels we barely knew we had.
  3. Endlessly enchanting.
  4. A Serious Man is not only hauntingly original, it’s the final piece of the puzzle that is the Coens. Combine suburban alienation, philosophical inquiry, moral seriousness, a mixture of respect for and utter indifference to Torah, and, finally, a ton of dope, and you get one of the most remarkable oeuvres in modern film.
  5. Up in the Air is poised to be a smash, and Clooney--slim, dark, perfectly tailored--glamorizes insincerity in a way that makes you want to go out and lie.
  6. Outrageously entertaining.
  7. This movie is utterly irresistible.
  8. Arnold's first feature, "Red Road" (2006), centers on another outsider, a woman who monitors security cameras. The film is formally brilliant, but it doesn't have the breathtaking openness of Fish Tank.
  9. The movie, a near-masterpiece, is a monument to intoxication: of sexual conquest, of military conquest, and, most of all, of cinema.
  10. The film is a nearly unrelenting nightmare. Even interviews shot with the survivors after the fact have a current of dread.
  11. It becomes a meditation on the dual nature of film, on a "reality" at once true and false, essential and tainted.
  12. This is one of the most galvanizing documentaries I've ever seen.
  13. As he proved in his Iraq-centered "No End in Sight," policy wonk turned documentarian Charles Ferguson has no peer when it comes to tracking the course of a preventable catastrophe.
  14. Shot by shot, scene by scene, it's a fluid and enthralling piece of work. I wasn't bored for a millisecond.
  15. The Kidman in Rabbit Hole is a revelation.
  16. Blessed is the go-for-it movie that can make room for dissonances and weirdness.
  17. The movie doesn't quite jell, but you'll feel its sting for hours.
  18. This supernatural comedy isn't just Allen's best film in more than a decade; it's the only one that manages to rise above its tidy parable structure and be easy, graceful, and glancingly funny, as if buoyed by its befuddled hero's enchantment.
  19. Mike Mills's marvelously inventive romantic comedy Beginners is pickled in sadness, loss, and the belief that humans (especially when they mate) are stunted by their parents' buried secrets, their own genetic makeup, and our sometimes-sociopathic social norms.
  20. Meehl, in her directing debut, is attuned to the rhythms of Buck, who's attuned to the horses.
  21. In Mysteries of Lisbon, the prolific Chilean-born director and egghead Raúl Ruiz has achieved something remarkable, at once avant-garde and middlebrow: the apotheosis of the soap opera.
  22. Nichols has a genius for making landscapes and everyday objects resonate like crazy, for nailing the texture of dread.
  23. Fiennes and Logan haven't made a definitive Coriolanus, but they've made a sensationally gripping one. They have the pulse of the play, its firm martial beats and its messy political clatter. They tell a damn good story.
  24. What makes it so good is that no one is bad. These humans, desperate to do right, are caught up in a perfect storm of inhumanity. The evil is in the ecosystem.
  25. In totalitarian societies, artists have found all sorts of ways - some brilliantly imaginative - to disguise their political protest, but Panahi has no subterfuges left. This Is Not a Film ends with a whimper that is a bang. He must be freed.
  26. You could never call Solondz a humanist, but he achieves something I've never seen elsewhere: compassionate revulsion.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Jarecki puts the veteran actor to brilliant use in the insanely gripping Arbitrage.
  27. No actor is as brilliant, or as cunning, as Denzel Washington at portraying superhuman coolness and the scary prospect of its loss.
  28. Lincoln is too sharply focused to deserve the pejorative "biopic" label. It's splendid enough to make me wish Spielberg would make a "prequel" to this instead of another Indiana Jones picture.
  29. So Polley has gone meta — exuberantly, entertainingly, with all her heart.

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