Nintendo Insider's Scores

  • Games
For 663 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Tetris Effect: Connected
Lowest review score: 10 Woodle Tree Adventures Deluxe
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 35 out of 663
667 game reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    I didn’t think ATLUS had it in them to make a game with the level of ambition packed into every inch of Shin Megami Tensei V.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Demon Turf may not have tantalised my platforming taste buds as much as I hoped for but I can see it gathering a well-deserved following. The community has already shown the impressive possibilities of getting from A to B in style, and I’m sure once the game gets into the hands of the wider public the possibilities are only going to flourish and amaze even more. With that said, the speedrunning community does make up for only a small percentage of the 3D platforming fanbase. So to say Demon Turf is a great 3D platformer for that reason alone is probably stretching it a bit. For what it’s worth though, it is at least a competent one.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Mario Party Superstars dips back into the series twenty-plus year history to deliver an entry that’s huge amounts of fun and sure to please long-time fans hungry for a more traditional Mario Party experience. Not only a warm nostalgic trip but the best party Mario has thrown in some time.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you can’t play it elsewhere, Disco Elysium: The Final Cut on Nintendo Switch is a great option, especially if it’s your first time playing. Returning Revacholians will find the long loading times to be an extra annoyance, but it’s not like we didn’t put up with worse when the PS5 version launched. There’s just nothing quite like Disco Elysium.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s impressive that even eight games deep, the Jackbox Party Pack series continues to deliver a reliable yearly source of laughter and fun. While The Jackbox Party Pack 8 may not offer the best quintet of games the series has packaged together, it’s certainly one of the more varied and hugely entertaining ways to spend an evening with friends and family.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Tetris Effect: Connected is an incredible experience top to bottom whether playing alone or with others in the newly added competitive modes. Its effortless blending of stunning visuals and euphoric music make this so much more than just a mere puzzle game though. It’s a sensory overload, an uplifting journey and even an emotional one at times where every moment spent is nothing short of mesmerising.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Metroid Dread stands as a phenomenal achievement. From project dormancy to becoming a sci-fi spectacle, MercurySteam has delivered a Game of the Year contender that’s quite capable of unleashing a Charge Blast to keep away the competition. A game like this deserves to be celebrated, and I can only hope that it has continued to lay the groundwork for more adventures with the intergalactic bounty hunter to come.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    After years of mediocrity for AiAi and the crew, there was always the worry SEGA might drop the ball when it came to a Super Monkey Ball 20th anniversary celebration. Thankfully, Super Monkey Ball: Banana Mania is a great remaster of the series’ best years packed full of content and given a handsome facelift. The major downgrade of the much-loved Monkey Target aside, there’s still plenty of fun to be had here fan or newcomer.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    I don’t think Bustafellows is perfect, but it nails most of what it aims for. The story is engaging, but the character drama and hilarious dialogue are what sell the experience. The production value makes it a visual treat, and it was so nice to play an Otome that never dropped my attention. Previously I’d considered Collar X Malice to be the best introductory Otome, but that’s now been dethroned. I still like that game, but this was such a wonderful experience. Apparently a “Second Season” is in the works that claims to be more than the traditional Otome fandisk. I honestly can’t wait, I hope for both a localization of that game after it comes out and more Otome games from PQube.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Well, it’s been an emotional ride from start to finish, and while DOOM Eternal: The Ancient Gods – Part One felt like a testing hill sprint to the top, The Ancient Gods – Part Two felt more like a fun whack-a-mole cooldown decline that the players deserve. Those who want to be tested until the very end may want to turn the difficulty up a notch for this one. Unless, of course, you’re already a relentless ultra nightmare DOOM-slaying beast.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Even if I prefer the original game and its simplicity compared to Spelunky 2, I’d still argue that you’re getting one of the best roguelikes of all time here. That core theme of learning that I ranted and raved about in the original Spelunky review is right here front and centre, it’s just a little harder to parse with so much going on. If the worst thing anyone can say about Spelunky 2 is that it’s just a tiny bit less perfect than Spelunky, I think that’s a pretty good outcome.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    I honestly didn’t think I could love Spelunky any more than I already did, but to see it translated so perfectly to a console that feels made for it is the icing on the cake. Spelunky is now available to pretty much everyone, and if I can teach you one thing from this review, it’s that you need to go and play it. It’s a modern masterpiece that you’ll never unlearn.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Monster Train: First Class is a hugely fun roguelike deck-builder whose ideas and mechanics remain satisfying and exciting whether you’re one hour in or thirty. This is one train ride you won’t want to miss.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    WarioWare: Get It Together! proves there’s plenty more fun left in the tank for his wonderfully zany series. Playing as the characters themselves is an unexpected direction but one that works brilliantly while the introduction of co-operative play creates an entirely new and exciting experience that I hope we see more of. WarioWare: Get It Together! once more delivers an experience unlike anything else out there, let’s just hope we don’t have to wait another ten years for the next.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    KeyWe successfully takes the fairly mundane environment of a telepost office and turns it into something fun and exciting. By injecting plenty of surprises, silliness and satisfying puzzles KeyWe is a real joy through all three of its seasons just so long as you have a second kiwi by your side.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    No More Heroes 3 is bloody, violent, crude, insane and even confusing at moments and it’s an experience I found myself having a great time with right up to closing credits. Performance issues can’t weigh down what is a truly exciting rollercoaster ride of a game and arguably Travis Touchdown’s best outing to date.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Fuga: Melodies of Steel quickly became one of my favorite hidden gems of the year. Few things taint an overall excellent RPG experience. It was one of those rare games that was so engaging that it actually made me not want to play it, just because I know I’d be spending hours hooked to the wonderfully exhausting gameplay loop. That sounds like a negative, but if you’re used to this genre you’d know that’s extremely high praise. The music, visuals, and gameplay all come together for a package that’s hard to put down. Fuga: Melodies of Steel is the kind of risk we should praise in this industry, and if you like RPGs that aren’t afraid to make bold design choices it deserves to be in your library.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s endlessly charming, has an in-depth combat system that feels great to learn, and constantly goes above and beyond what the original did. I am praying that it sees the success it deserves, because this wonderful world can’t end here.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Like with all of the best gaming experiences, I ended my time with The Great Ace Attorney Chronicles feeling satisfied… yet painfully empty. Games this special don’t come out often. I was sad to see it eventually end, yet honored to be a part of the adventure.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword HD stands as the definitive way to experience the origins of the Master Sword. To this day, there’s still nothing else quite like it – from the strategic swordplay to Nintendo’s unrelentingly inventive puzzle design – and while it excels in its playful experimentation, the game represents a stepping stone to where the series would lead in the future as much as it delivers an origin story that allows you to discover the secrets of the past. Ultimately, it is still a memorable quest worth setting out on, and one that is now more resplendent than ever before.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Out of all the Mana games I’ve played this is easily the best one. There are so many reasons to revisit it thanks to how open progression is. Your natural curiosity is rewarded around every turn, and your choices actually shape the world. I can see how my playthrough could differ greatly to that of someone else’s, and I’m excited to continue to revisit it throughout the years. I hope this is the template Square is basing their next console Mana game on, because this is truly something special. Even if it isn’t though, I’m happy enough that the bar for remastering sprite-based games has been raised once again.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whether you’re planning on grabbing the Year One Season Pass, DOOM Eternal Deluxe Edition or purchasing both halves of the downloadable content individually, The Ancient Gods – Part One is a worthwhile half a dozen or so hours investment. It may at first set the initial impression to expect more of the same. However, the ever-interesting level design wrapping around some very clever and incredibly testing gunplay scenarios consistently deters it from rarely ever feeling that way.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 1 + 2 was practically a perfect game when it launched, and here we’ve got a port that gets everything that worked about it and makes it portable – with only a few small concessions. If you’ve played it before, it’s absolutely worth being able to play it wherever you go, and if you haven’t given them a chance until now then the Nintendo Switch is a fantastic platform to do so.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Reflecting on my time with Mario Golf: Super Rush it’s hard not to draw comparisons with 2018’s Mario Tennis Aces. Just like that game, the story mode once again lacks punch leaving little (outside online) to keep lone players occupied. That being said, new modes Speed Golf and Battle Golf are fantastic additions and the mechanics at play continue the series trend of offering an accessible and highly satisfying golfing experience. Get some friends together and Mario Golf: Super Rush is a hole in one.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Game Builder Garage is an excellent introduction to the world of game programming. While it might not be the most comprehensive example out there, it’s certainly the most accessible and charming one I’ve had the joys of experiencing.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Power Rangers: Battle for the Grid – Super Edition is far more fun and interesting than it has any right to be. To see a game evolve from something that has the potential to be half decent into a genuine contender makes it seem so much more accomplished than any world-famous studio currently pumping millions of dollars into a landmark title. Whether you are a fan of the series, have a general interest in fighting games or are an all-out combo fiend, Power Rangers: Battle for the Grid – Super Edition is well worth the investment.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is probably the best way to get into the series, and is great for fans of the original to re-experience this classic as we approach the release of Shin Megami Tensei V. I’ve been waiting for years for the next mainline entry, and I couldn’t be more excited. I’m primed and ready now ATLUS, show me what you got.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Famicom Detective Club is not terribly complicated by modern standards. The games show their ages in spots, and can be frustrating to figure out, but this is absolutely the kind of murder mystery stories I’ve been looking for. The true strength of these remakes is how they made me feel nostalgic for an era of video games I wasn’t even alive during. They recapture the feeling of classic ADV titles while modernizing just enough of the experience to keep the games accessible. The mysteries offered are both fresh, yet comfortably late ’80s. Bigger budgeted “Visual Novels” are always welcome, and a push for them to be played worldwide is even better. I think Famicom Detective Club: The Girl Who Stands Behind is the stronger of the two, but this is a great package all the same. If you’re fine with some tedium here and there, this is a glowing recommendation from me.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Famicom Detective Club is not terribly complicated by modern standards. The games show their ages in spots, and can be frustrating to figure out, but this is absolutely the kind of murder mystery stories I’ve been looking for. The true strength of these remakes is how they made me feel nostalgic for an era of video games I wasn’t even alive during. They recapture the feeling of classic ADV titles while modernizing just enough of the experience to keep the games accessible. The mysteries offered are both fresh, yet comfortably late ’80s. Bigger budgeted “Visual Novels” are always welcome, and a push for them to be played worldwide is even better. I think Famicom Detective Club: The Girl Who Stands Behind is the stronger of the two, but this is a great package all the same. If you’re fine with some tedium here and there, this is a glowing recommendation from me.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Atelier Ryza 2: Lost Legends & the Secret Fairy is like eating a veggie chip: while you love the concept of vegetables in chip form as a picky eater, as you proceed to enjoy it you begin to remember that the chips still contain them, and as a result you’re left with a weird aftertaste. By all means, Atelier Ryza 2 is superior to the first game in almost every sense of the term except story (and that’s being a bit generous), but I never got used to continuously feeling like I’m drifting off-course despite progressing. Regardless, Atelier Ryza 2 is an example of a sequel done right, and I’m looking forward to seeing where Gust goes with the series in the future.

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