Playstation Official Magazine UK's Scores

  • Games
For 2,633 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Mass Effect 3
Lowest review score: 10 The Quiet Man
Score distribution:
2635 game reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Weaves Lovecraftian mythos into an interesting setting. But it frequently veers into being dull and repetitive, which isn’t what you want from dreamlike horror. [Issue#165, p.89]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A personal journey through troubled waters that won’t strike a chord with everyone. The scenery sweetens the deal if you’re debating buying a ticket for this voyage. [Issue#165, p.86]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A fantastic reboot that reworks Samurai Shodown’s best ideas into an accomplished Street Fighter V-alike. It can’t truly escape the trappings of its own heritage, but fans will adore SNK’s return. [Issue#165, p.82]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    We keep rubbing our eyes, hoping that the game it clearly wants to be materialises. Unfortunately we can’t overlook its many flaws. [Issue#165, p.97]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Simply the best-ever reproduction of this high-speed, high-tech motorsport. It’s very familiar, but nonetheless noticeably superior to the 2018 game. Essential. [Issue#165, p.85]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Takes what was great about the first and adds to it without diluting it. It’s possibly a little too simple – the boss battles aren’t much of a challenge – but that just makes it all the more relaxing. [Issue#165, p.94]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Crash has cruised back to prove he’s still the best. PS1’s premier kart racing game is also the finest on PS4. With free updates to come, we’re staying on the grid. [Issue#165, p.79]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The only thing holding it back is the whiff of old age. This is a two-year old PC game ported to PS VR, and visually and technically it’s no Blood & Truth. But if you can overlook the low-textures and simplistic storytelling Sairento VR remains a sharp slice of neon-ninja fun. [Issue#165, p.96]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As arcadey as its races often are, there’s enough realism here to ground proceedings in a strangely compelling manner. Example? How about blowing out a tyre2 and the game forcing you to complete the race as you hobble along in eighth place like a six-tonne knackered shopping trolley. Fugly and frantic, this is a unique racer. [Issue#165, p.96]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Etherborn is superb if you’re looking for a game to relax with. It’s certainly not without its challenges but the difficulty is wholly benign, allowing you to appreciate the carefully crafted world and its gravity-shifting environments. [Issue#165, p.96]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If this had been the whole game, it might have been something special. Unfortunately, it throws all the previously mentioned elements in too, none of which are given the time, care, or attention that they need.2 Thus you have sections that are poorly explained or feel almost superfluous, choices with consequences that don’t always make sense, a judge who for some reason wants to control the whole of Paris, and characters who it is very difficult to become attached to. [Issue#165, p.84]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Irony Curtain succeeds as a love letter to classic point-and-click games. Its sharp satirical core is perfectly realised, and, most importantly, it’s laugh-out-loud funny! [Issue#165, p.84]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    What can’t be overlooked, however, is the lack of fan service; there’s no classic art or game history to unlock. Ultimately, Toki is a chimp off the old block. [Issue#165, p.84]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A nostalgia trip for Castlevania fans, a flawed but enjoyable adventure for others. Prepare to look up a guide every now and then to find your way, though. [Issue#165, p.87]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    By sticking to classic Final Fantasy elements – an expansive world, and a deftly-told story that weaves in themes – Shadowbringers is one of the best MMO expansions we’ve ever played. The main drawback is that you have to play through the previous ones to access this new content, or pay extra for a story skip. But with all side-quests in Shadowbringers syncing to your player level, and a New Game+ allowing you to replay old quests on the horizon, this might be something we’ll see further in Final Fantasy XIV’s future. [Issue#165, p.92]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Some may enjoy a thoroughly planned itinerary but the brochure led us to believe this fine establishment would allow us to go with the flow just a little more. [Issue#164, p.88]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    So-so gameplay is buoyed by a fantastic script and great acting, offering an unofficial stopgap for R&M fans waiting for season four. [Issue#164, p.97]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Great when it’s delivering gripping, cinematic moments. It’s just a shame that the bits when you’re controlling a slightly menacing AI aren’t the highlights. [Issue#164, p.91]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A great Yakuza spinoff that stumbles over its well-meant but clunky detective gameplay. More doing, less talking, and a sense of humour could’ve elevated it. [Issue#164, p.83]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Expect the usual Everybody’s Golf experience, and we’re afraid you’ll be disappointed. Instead, wood you kindly expect some great VR golf that’s impressively deep and very addictive. [Issue#164, p.94]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Elsweyr is something of a drab comedown from Summerset’s embarrassment of floral riches, but there are compelling quests, and you can’t dislike anything with dragons. [Issue#164, p.93]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Especially commendable are Cricket 19’s best-in-show customisation options. While only England, Australia, and Australian domestic sides are licensed, all non-licensed sides – and there are loads – can be immediately overwritten with fan-created versions. Giving you ‘real’ names and kits for the exotic likes of Barbados Tridents, and Sunrisers Hyderabad, and, uh, Denmark. Oh to have such touch-of-a-button editing functionality in PES. [Issue#164, p.89]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    With historical challenges, new sticker/ number/helmet decal editors and a brutal Pro Career for the full experience, there’s plenty to keep fans happy. But it isn’t doing enough to appeal more widely than that, and even its target market will lament the technical steps backwards from MotoGP 17. [Issue#164, p.89]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s a short, by-the-numbers thriller that’s enjoyably creepy even with the limits of the production on full display. [Issue#164, p.89]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This PS4 release includes two new difficulty levels, with Easy making enemies less daunting thanks to increased damage output. Hard, meanwhile, should satisfy any cravings you have for a challenge when gunning for Diamond rank. And unlockable outfits add extra character to a whimsical 2D platformer that already had enough to spare. [Issue#164, p.90]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Each campaign offers enough of a twist on the core loop to keep things interesting, either with environmental effects such as a health-sapping chill in the air or otherwise by switching up the rules of engagement. Acquainting yourself with each class’s specialities, especially as you equip better weapons and unlock new abilities, is a treat as well. However, there’s little to recommend to those who are not already fans of the genre and eager to roll some dice. [Issue#164, p.90]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is the best Atelier yet, and a prime point for newcomers to jump in. [Issue#164, p.90]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A convoluted narrative muddies the waters too with a series of dubious decisions that affect the ending, and the game fast outstays its welcome with a stack of tenuous puzzles. It’s impossible not to feel like there’s something special hidden between the chases, but for a game with such a wilful director, all it actually needed was an editor. [Issue#164, p.96]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s an undeniable charm to be found in conversing with a cake NPC, fighting bizarre bosses, and travelling through the Horse Dimension, but there’s a solid game underlying the comical presentation. Four difficulty settings will ensure you find the level of challenge you’re after, and a PVP Arena mode will let you challenge your friends to switch things up. [Issue#164, p.96]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The trilogy ends with Dracula’s Curse, which adds four playable characters and multiple routes, taking us even closer to the metroidvania approach we love. Arguably the best game in this collection, it demonstrates why director Hitoshi Akamatsu is one of the unsung heroes of the 8-bite, erm, -bit era. [Issue#164, p.96]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK

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