Playstation Official Magazine UK's Scores

  • Games
For 2,964 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Persona 5 Royal
Lowest review score: 10 The Quiet Man
Score distribution:
2966 game reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A basic upgrade. The SSD helps load some elements more quickly; the graphics aren’t radically improved. That said, the game is still phenomenal. [Issue#187, p.88]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Signs Of The Sojourner is a compelling adventure that explores loss, healing, and the intimacy of conversations, wonderfully gamifying interaction. [Issue#187, p.89]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A celebration of videogaming’s brashest decade, Narita Boy at times tries too hard to impress but always feels good to play. Turn it up to 11 and enjoy the ride. [Issue#187, p.83]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Thanks to an increased, stabilised framerate, and clever use of the DualSense, PS5 offers the definitive version of Mortal Shell. Just remember it’s no Demon’s Souls. [Issue#187, p.84]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This playful space is engaging and sequesters some neat solutions but we wish Maquette thought more outside the box and followed its own fun. [Issue#187, p.86]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A surprisingly meaty, touching miniaturised romp. Ready up a player two! [Issue#187, p.79]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A very pretty and slick platformer that runs beautifully on PS5. Use of the console’s unique features are limited, but it’s still well worth playing. [Issue#187, p.80]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    While its underpinnings are strong, it never fulfils its potential, and there are probably some lessons on how not to write a visual novel in here. If you came for cool werewolves, you’ll probably be bogged down by all the deforestation stuff. If you came for an environmental story, you may well be overwhelmed by World Of Darkness lore. Either way, it’s a miss, but it does at least aim in the right direction. [Issue#187, p.81]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Sadly, things get rather grindy towards the end, and Anodyne 2’s refusal to be clear about anything can make finding the last few items you need harder than it should be. Nonetheless, this is an enjoyable trip unlike any other. If you’re looking for something that differentiates itself from the ocean of grim shooters and angsty apocalypses, you won’t be disappointed with this. [Issue#187, p.81]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With new online modes, capable and fun split-screen, and one truly great fictional racetrack (Rusty Ravine), it’s only really let down by its slight low-budget feel and sense of déjà vu. But being enjoyable to play is surely the whole point of a videogame, and this is very enjoyable indeed. [Issue#187, p.81]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With such assured motion, incident-packed races and gorgeous stadium track visuals this should be an easy recommendation, especially since it’s a deluxe version of an already-polished series. But the harsh handling model and extreme sense of déjà vu suck out a lot of the fun. [Issue#187, p.85]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Besides spider death, each area has multiple objectives. Some of these force you doing a little bit of thinking, others simply ask you to destroy a set number of a certain object. Levels start out small, their routes unfurling as you reach spider-killing milestones. Progression is satisfying, though once you become used to the game’s tricks it wears a little thin. Still, if you want to “kill it with fire” and a whole lot more, it certainly lives up to its promise. [Issue#187, p.85]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite the pratfalls, it’s fun to swing into action here. [Issue#187, p.85]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you’re tired of 2.5D puzzle-platformers with a horror tinge, The Pedestrian’s signswitching action will serve as a refreshing roadside alternative. [Issue#186, p.89]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fans of the original need to play this. A fun story sits beside what made the last game special. Combat is mediocre, but flashy enough to bash through. [Issue#186, p.86]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Shallow, but also attractive and a lot of fun. Take Destruction AllStars for a spin, and you’re guaranteed a good time whenever you slip into the driving seat. [Issue#186, p.91]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Whether you’re dipping in and out or hunkering down with it for a long ol’ gaming sesh, Ys IX is captivating, rewarding, and worthy JRPG. [Issue#186, p.83]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Two of the best in the genre are running better than ever natively on PS5. While not startlingly novel, if you missed out before, you’re in for a treat. [Issue#186, p.94]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The deaths caused by the controls being not as responsive as we’d like may annoy, but there’s a whole world out there you’re going to want to feast your eyes on. [Issue#186, p.79]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Not being able to carry over save data is a huge drawback. However, we enjoyed uncovering the bureau’s secrets all over again, with ray-traced drama. [Issue#186, p.88]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While there’s no ignoring the limitations of the production, everything culminates into a laser-focused indie experience that is very much more than the sum of its parts. For a sunrise you won’t soon forget, this is more than worth the just-overfive- quid price of entry. [Issue#186, p.82]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    After a handful of runs you may feel as if you’ve seen everything. The combat system still makes this worth a try if you’re itching for more roguelikes. [Issue#186, p.82]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Frustration is bad enough, but pain? Unacceptable. [Issue#186, p.82]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s rare to get top-quality Amiga games on PlayStation. Yet this collection can feel bare-bones, with extras only stretching to affectionate TV filters. If you’ve never played Turrican this is a curiosity. If, however, you grew up on the series there’s a sugary hit of nostalgia. [Issue#186, p.85]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Levels are served at random, so you’re not forcing yourself to do the exact same thing over and over again, but we ran into a lot of repeats. There’s something to love here, but it’s all incredibly basic, and perhaps a bit too fiddly to quite deliver with how the controls are translated to an analogue stick. [Issue#186, p.85]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The story is muddled and not engaging, which could be forgivable if the action was more involving. Using the monocle to see clues is a nice idea, but it’s underutilised and poorly implemented (though it’s possible some of this could be a porting error). The encounters with the Mother are successfully tense, and the (few) monster designs are good. It’s almost a shame you don’t see more of them. Silver Chains does achieve some solid jump scares and would be worth a run-through with friends if you can pick it up in a sale. Overall, though, it sadly lacks both substance and polish. [Issue#186, p.85]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    See past the low-budget looks, and you’ll find this is no shaggy dog tale. It’s a well-paced adventure that’s worth sinking your teeth (and claws) into. [Issue#185, p.85]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Freddy’s first outing is a jump scare legend and a fantastic case study of pure, simple design. It’s too bad later outings simply don’t play well on a controller. [Issue#185, p.89]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Most of the issues have been addressed, making for a much more palatable bike sim. It’s still lacking spectacle and charm, but the quality’s much higher. [Issue#185, p.88]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A slick, surprisingly heartfelt 2D platformer that excels not in one area but in many. Olija’s a brilliant addition to Devolver Digital’s lineup of experimental indies. [Issue#185, p.83]
    • Playstation Official Magazine UK

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