Polygon's Scores

For 840 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Persona 4 Golden
Lowest review score: 10 Steel Battalion: Heavy Armor
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 51 out of 840
1124 game reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Streets of Rage 4 is everything I could have wanted from a true Streets of Rage sequel. I’m satiated. But Streets of Rage, as a series, is a time capsule from a different, simpler era. While it’s blunt and repetitive, it also manifests a relaxing social space with ease. Call it video games as loitering. The music is as good as it’s ever been in the series. The stages and characters are beautiful, reimagining the original trilogy’s ’90s locales and punk-inspired band of baddies in a way that stands up to those games without scarring modern eyes. The action itself is so simple that you can get lost in a conversation about, well, anything as you play.
    • 83 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    This is a simple package, with an unassuming title and cover, is already one of my favorite releases of the year. Nintendo may have released the perfect game at the perfect time with Animal Crossing: New Horizons, and it looks like the company may be able to repeat the same trick when Clubhouse Games: 51 Worldwide Classics is released on June 5. [Polygon Recommends]
    • 75 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Microsoft and Mojang have created a game where you’re hitting endless minions and boss characters with all sorts of pointy weapons, but they did so in such a way that playing still feels creative, and freeing. That’s a very welcome magic trick from a series trying something this new, this confidently.
    • 71 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    It feels good to be a “thoughtless” creature of hunger and rage. You know those novelty rooms humans visit, where they put on protective gear and break stuff with baseball bats and sledgehammers. That is me, that is my life.
    • 85 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    An already near-perfect game has been made slightly better due to the hardware it’s on, making this the definitive version of the game. [Polygon Recommends]
    • 69 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Saints Row: The Third Remastered does a trillion stupid things, and everything is deliberately over the top, but it’s so much fun that I never dwell on the the parts that might otherwise make me uncomfortable, because it is fully, beautifully committed to its absurdity. It punches up, it punches down, and it punches every which way except at me, because me? I’m cool. [Polygon Recommends]
    • 77 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    If you walked away from The Wonderful 101 early on, like I did back in 2013, Remastered is unlikely to change your opinion of the game’s character-action merits. Newcomers shouldn’t approach The Wonderful 101 Remastered like Platinum’s other games, e.g. Bayonetta or Astral Chain, in which big, easily readable combatants beat up bad guys a few at a time with balletic, combo-chaining grace. It’s more like pitting dueling riots against each other, which offers its own style of fun. The Nintendo Switch’s success has given many overlooked Wii U games a second chance to find a new audience, and The Wonderful 101 Remastered deserves to be experienced by more players.
    • 85 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    All the game’s scenes — both in the journal and in space — are precisely crafted to fit within the narrative, which ran almost two hours for me. The pacing and physical action of erasing reminds me of games like Florence, also published by Annapurna Interactive, in how the mechanics mimic the emotion of feeling of a particular moment. If Found… makes the physical motions even simpler, but pushes in an intricate, braided story.
    • 82 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Super Mega Baseball 3 is still a thrilling, engaging, fun baseball experience on the field. I fell in love with Metalhead’s games from the start, enjoying elements like the innovative pitching controls — still one of my favorite mechanics in any baseball game I’ve ever played — while I giggled and smirked at the players’ ridiculous names. With its smart, engrossing franchise mode bringing it home, Super Mega Baseball 3 is another fantastic entry in what has become one of my all-time favorite sports series.
    • 78 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Just like Overcooked, I can’t tell if the game is bringing us together or tearing us apart in these trying times, but it’s certainly teaching us how to communicate and cooperate in high-pressure situations, which is a skill that every family should be brushing up on during quarantine.
    • 81 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    This is a near miss, but as anyone who has ever played a turn-based game will tell you, a near miss can be all the enemy needs to take you out. This is an interesting, but hardly essential, addition to the Gears family.
    • 77 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Despite its imperfections, fans of tactical strategy games should snatch XCOM: Chimera Squad up as soon as possible. The asking price means that no one has much to lose by giving it a shot, even if you didn’t like previous XCOM titles. With luck, the price point will even expose the genre to more players than ever before. [Polygon Recommends]
    • 46 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Cooking Mama: Cookstar is a mess, and isn’t worth the controversy around its release. There is little to no reward for success, or even for trying. The motion controls don’t work. The content is often recycled from past games. The fact that it was somehow released in this state is kind of interesting, and physical copies may become collector’s items, but that will only be due to their rarity, not any value in the game itself.
    • 87 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Remake is also the very best thing a game can be: fascinating. It forces us to confront our subjective tastes, and asks us to consider what we value in the games we play. Your feelings about Remake will be determined by what you, personally, valued in the original release.
    • 78 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    The Foundation isn’t the studio’s greatest work, but it’s hardly a miserable experience. This expansion reminded me of the Xbox 360 era of midtier shooters: not bad, but not ambitious. Playable, but also — and sadly — forgettable.
    • 95 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    If you loved the original game and have been wanting to replay it, there are plenty of quality-of-life improvements to make your replay smoother, and the additional content in the third semester is a real treat. You’ll have to replay a lot of content, but the new story beats, characters, and gameplay changes are worth the time. If you’ve never played Persona 5, and the idea of a lengthy JRPG about making friends, making evil adults admit their crimes, and fighting monsters sounds cool, this is the definitive way to experience the game. Be aware of some problematic plot elements that are not totally fixed. But the game is stylish, full of things to do, and still one of the most interesting JRPGs of this console generation. [Polygon Recommends]
    • 79 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Were it not for the high expectations set by Resident Evil 2, Capcom’s similarly lavish remake of Resident Evil 3 would stand out as a gorgeous example of a survival horror game lovingly and painstakingly reimagined. At times it manages to be exactly that, modernizing the story of Jill Valentine’s escape from a zombie-ravaged Raccoon City crafted with amazing production values. But the shadow of its very recent predecessor looms so large as to overshadow it. Like last year’s game, Resident Evil 3 is a great example of what a video game remake should be. It’s just that the source material is a little less impressive this time around — and so is the end result.
    • 78 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    The Room VR traps you inside a wonderfully cohesive world with internal logic that doesn’t have to play by the established rules of our reality. It forces you to think your way out of things while greater powers always seem right around the corner. This is dread, disguised as a puzzle game, and VR has only made it better. [Polygon Recommends]
    • 93 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    The only thing left is whether hardcore fans will be willing to buy, and use, a virtual reality headset in order to learn what happens next in the world of Half-Life. The good news is that those who do will experience what is likely the best VR game released to date.
    • 88 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Treat Doom Eternal like dessert — something to be savored, not hurried. When you have the rare moment between feeding one demon its own heart and breaking another demon’s arm and hammering the freshly protruding bone through the demon’s skull, take a breath to admire the engineering and artistry that makes your actions possible, how the world encourages playful movement, how the specific design of an arena and the placement of each enemy invites you to chain your violence in one ecstatic flourish. Always be moving, but never rush. [Polygon Recommends]
    • 91 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Animal Crossing: New Horizons is a respite from the current state of the world. I find my general anxiety slowly subside as I run through my town, water my plants, and build furniture for the sassy chicken gentleman living down by the beach. It’s exactly what I need right now. There are moments when I look up from a long session and realize that I’ve been ignoring everything around me. Then I take a look around at what actually is going on around me, and realize that maybe I’d better stay in my island paradise for a little while longer.
    • 85 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    I don’t think a game has ever asked as much from me as Nioh 2. Yet still I return, because if a game is going to be this demanding, it had better be fair, and Nioh 2 is always fair, even if it often feels like just a little too much. It’s a puzzle game. It’s baking bread. It’s everything that yields rewards only after you learn to think differently, and learn consistency and focus. And I’m getting better at it. I’m getting wise.
    • 68 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Rescue Team lets me get to know Pokémon as actual people, often building on top of the decades of fandom and indirect characterization established by the games. Of course Charizard is in a cool rescue team that everyone looks up to. Of course Gengar the ghost is a devilish jerk who steals from others. Of course the motherly Khanghaskan, who carries around a child in her pouch, calls you sweetie when you use her storage services. It’s enough to make me want to never see another human in a Pokémon game ever again.
    • 90 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Ori and the Will of the Wisps offers a gorgeous world to explore and a varied, creative series of abilities and tasks that guide my exploration and help me see more of this wonderful place. It expands my options in combat and offers me more to do, and mostly benefits from that added complexity, while losing some of its focus in the process. Overall, however, it’s a worthy trade off.
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    It’s a great first civ-builder, or a low key adventuring game that dodges the awkwardness of combat and stilted camera angles. My settlement never had quite the same character as the Stardew Valley Pelican Town, or an Animal Crossing village, but that was also okay; Dwarrows doesn’t try to be everything, and the result is a welcome throwback to a game that was once lost to the late 90s.
    • 83 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    In terms of a clean, simple release of two classic games at a fair price, playable this smoothly at this high of a resolution on modern consoles? It’s hard to complain. If you’ve ever wanted to play Bayonetta or Vanquish on your current-generation console, or have yet to pick up the PC releases, this is a great excuse to do so.
    • 60 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Sadly, Days of War feels like its developers tried and failed to reach a bridge too far, and that’s a real shame.
    • 59 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Reforged ultimately feels like a dusty museum exhibit more than a faithful remaster or an update into the modern age. It could have been an excellent way to introduce this story and game to a new generation...Instead, it’s a halfhearted release that misses the opportunity to bring Warcraft 3 back to its old audience while hopefully finding a new one. Blizzard is aware of the issues, and the offering of an instant refund, no questions asked, to anyone not happy doesn’t seem like a good sign...Reforged isn’t what was promised, and it isn’t what I wanted. Based on the community’s reaction, I’m not alone in that regard.
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    I like Not for Broadcast, but it looks like a The Fly-style experiment grafted together from two different games. I would like very much to play either of them separately, but putting them together weakens the final product. There’s time for developer NotGames to right the ship, however, and the mechanics are intriguing enough to keep me interested in the next chapter.
    • 87 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    On its surface, Kentucky Route Zero appears to be hyper-traditional. The game begins; I’m given a clear objective; I’m going to see this through. Along the way, I meet people who can help me on this quest. But the truth is that the quest is not the point. It’s the people, the world, the journey itself that all make this game tick. [Polygon Recommends]

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