Polygon's Scores

For 840 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Persona 4 Golden
Lowest review score: 10 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 51 out of 840
1317 game reviews
    • 91 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    In conclusion, The Stanley Parable: Ultra Deluxe is a game that can, and should, be played. [Polygon Recommends]
    • 68 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    My relationship to Swansong has become almost like my ritual appointment with Passions — until I fully exhaust the entire story, I need my dose of ridiculous people making ridiculous decisions, and the nuclear fallout of their mistakes.
    • 88 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Rogue Legacy 2’s extremely random nature would crush a lesser game, but Cellar Door Games uses that pressure to create diamonds. Even if it’s occasionally frustrating, Rogue Legacy 2 refuses to ever let me be bored, and that’s more than enough to set it apart from the heap of roguelites that have followed in the original game’s wake. I’m 30 hours into Rogue Legacy 2, and I’m still discovering new toys to play with. But I still haven’t found another spoon.
    • 81 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    While there’s enough tactical depth and customization to sustain a playthrough, much of Daemonhunters’ battles feel like vehicles for getting across its great story, and not the other way around. For many, XCOM is as much about the long journey — failures and do-overs included — as it is the destination. And while I don’t think Daemonhunters offers that same kind of obsessive replayability, it does lay a crunchy, thrilling tactical base for its brazen aesthetic and brilliant story to tread upon. [Polygon Recommends]
    • 82 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Citizen Sleeper’s most potent power lies in that first playthrough, when you arrive with nothing, and know even less. This isn’t so much about “replay value” as it is about the singular experience of a journey that — in keeping with the fiction of being a ragged Sleeper trying to survive — is very much a one-way street. Did I do right by my Sleeper? I don’t know. But all things must come to an end, and I feel like they would understand. [Polygon Recommends]
    • 80 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Really, this is one of those games for which early-access status was a bit of a misnomer, not because it had no room to improve or features to add, but because its premise was so fully, perfectly realized from the start. Add too much to it, or do anything that might disturb its delicate balance between friction and flow, between logic and naturalism, and it would have been ruined. But the Toukana team knows better than that. They are at peace, strolling through the countryside of the mind. [Polygon Recommends]
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Overall, I’m excited to see how The Iron Oath develops; Curious Panda Games has already laid out a road map throughout 2022 leading to an eventual full release that includes a new class, more points of interest, and more quests. For now, I’m having a lot of fun with the current build — my mercenaries, on the other hand, probably have some complaints with my management style.
    • 72 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Nintendo Switch Sports targets this audience, from the retired to the new parents, nostalgic for a type of gaming experience that hasn’t quite been recreated since. These are the final generations widely unfamiliar with modern video game controllers. And for Nintendo, that audience may be more than enough. That said, I do hope younger folks give this game a shot. I think they might once the game’s online mode is available, a place where people under the age of 35 are far more likely to play games. Until I can try those features, though, I’m happy to think of this as Nintendo’s love letter to the old and the old at heart. The company took over a decade to make the game, but maybe they were waiting for folks like me to age into it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Norco ends on a visceral note that will speak to Louisiana’s staunch hangers-on, but also to anyone seeking a beautiful, oppressive, and ultimately hopeful story. The past and future compound, and my reaction was unbridled. As I heaved and sobbed over my computer screen, I thought once again about faith — the kind it takes to stay here. If you don’t understand that faith, Norco may very well convince you.
    • 89 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Saying that a game is perfect for Switch is a tired phrase, I know, but this game is perfect for Switch in a different way than usual. It’s nice that I can play this text-heavy game on the go, but what makes Switch the perfect home for 13 Sentinels is the option to alternate between portable and TV modes. When I’m grinding through mech battles or revisiting character sequences for clues, the portability is perfect. However, when I start a new story, I prefer the TV mode, projecting the game’s gorgeous hand-drawn art on a larger screen. I don’t recommend playing the entire game on a TV — as I did with the PS4 version. But I encourage you to take breaks from portable mode now and then to really appreciate just how beautiful this game can be. [Polygon Recommends]
    • 78 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Like the sport it portrays, MLB The Show 22 will take a very long season to show me its real virtues. But the short-term successes I’ve already had make it enticing to see that season through to the end. I am sure that repeated commentary, rote animations, and inexplicable simulation results will nag at me come September. I’m also sure that I will still be playing this game in October.
    • 76 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    With Weird West, these magic moments appear far too infrequently. Sheer ambition means eventually something special is bound to be spat out by the game’s extensive simulations — a mishap with an oil lamp, for example — although it’ll be a rough and unwieldy thing, all the more crude when compared with the extensive elegance of a Dishonored. Instead of doing what many, myself included, had hoped — converting the spirit of Arkane and the immersive sim into an inventive top-down form — Weird West has stumbled into a more mundane existence as a pared-down computer RPG that’s nowhere near weird enough.
    • 79 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    By not taking its time or its space too seriously, the game leaves the player free to romp, roam, and plunder it likewise. Tiny Tina’s Wonderlands thus breathes new, weird life into a franchise that had become terminally rote, and reminds me why guns-meets-Diablo was the perfect obsession so many years ago.
    • 85 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Every time Kirby and the Forgotten Land showed me something new, I loved it. I smiled from ear to ear the first time I watched Kirby become a traffic cone, or throw his gob over a water tower. I loved that opening moment in each new area where I could run around the overworld and get peeks into the new areas I’d be venturing into. The cutscenes are gorgeous, and watching Kirby and friends take a nap in his little house is adorable (as it always is). But Kirby and the Forgotten Land burns too brightly, too soon, and that initial joy was hard to recall by the time the credits rolled.
    • 75 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Perhaps the kindest thing I can say about Ghostwire: Tokyo is that it’s an endearing experience. There’s a lot of care on display, from the cultural detail in the sweet side stories to the rendering of the rain-swept world itself. But whatever charm there is gets bogged down by frustrating design decisions and sluggish mechanics. It may be a captivating setting, but Ghostwire: Tokyo is difficult to recommend to all but the most devoted students of Japanese culture.
    • 85 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    A person’s experience of playing Tunic will absolutely be what they’ve made of it. Those uninterested in secrets or super-challenging gameplay can move along the main path as they please, thanks to these different settings. But there will also be players that revel in knowing everything about the world and defeating all of its bosses. The amazing thing is how Tunic serves all of those players without compromising on either front. This is a delightful, puzzling journey. [Polygon Recommends]
    • 72 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    I didn’t expect to enjoy smashing the heads of monsters like this. I also didn’t expect to enjoy a story about a hyper-masculine man like Jack. But what I’ve come to learn in my time with Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin is that Jack isn’t a knight in shining armor. He’s better. [Review in Progress]
    • 81 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    With all of its endless intricacies, its variety of end-game content, and of course, its stylish action, Lost Ark feels like it’s destined to remain something of a phenomenon for quite some time. Getting to the endgame can sometimes feel like a chore, and the game’s economy can be a headache unto itself — but the rewards upon arrival are worth the trek several times over. Smilegate and Amazon have managed to sustain interest in the title with its full release. However, the true test lies in keeping that momentum going.
    • 83 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    In the end, it’s the lack of confidence that gets me. Because on paper, Triangle Strategy resembles my dream game. And at certain points, it comes pretty damn close. It just can’t help exerting a heavy hand to force-feed the story as it’s “meant to be.” Like a Lego employee kicking down my door to chastise me for ignoring the instruction manual, it rarely lets me build my own structure with the bricks piled in front of me.
    • 87 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    If it’s ever tempting to think that Polyphony has been left behind by the times, we should remember that the Sport mode is its greatest achievement of the past decade, and that it remains without peer in its field. And if it seems striking that GT and its closest current mass-market competitor, Forza Horizon, now seem to be operating in different worlds — stylistically, philosophically, structurally — we should consider ourselves lucky to be able to enjoy two such distinctive approaches, both executed at the highest level. With GT7, Gran Turismo continues to be a glorious anomaly: a game made with different goals and to different standards than any other; a game made in service to a singular, individual vision; a game that’s all science and engineering on the outside, and all history and heart within.
    • 73 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    My complaints aren’t much more than minor dents and scratches on another beautiful ride from video gaming’s foremost racing studio. Grid Legends’ developers put a ton of effort into Driven to Glory, and then wisely made that a preamble to a much larger, much longer playing experience elsewhere, rather than focusing players’ attention entirely on a single-use story mode. It’s a strong, tarmac-based counterpart to the Dirt series, and satisfies a wider range of competitive urges than the dedicated F1 simulation that launches every year. And the consistently exciting racing, as both spectator and competitor, that Grid Legends delivers should have every racing fan wondering why something like this can’t be found in real life, too.
    • 96 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Elden Ring is the natural next step for FromSoftware, which last delivered a huge fantasy world like this in Dark Souls 3. That game featured a sprawling, interconnected world, a vast armory, and an incredible amount to learn, wield, and discover. Elden Ring is that game amplified — it plucks the best from Bloodborne, with its compact, puzzle-like mini-dungeons, and Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, which offered new levels of mobility and faster action. But, all told, FromSoftware has done more than just remix its earlier games and layer on open-world influence with Elden Ring. The studio’s conversation with the player goes in fascinating new directions, and there are great surprises here for longtime fans of Souls games; From clearly knows what we expect of its castles, its boss encounters, the random out-of-nowhere ambushes, and it plays with those expectations. Sometimes it means I die unexpectedly. And sometimes it makes me smile
    • 57 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Many players will undoubtedly grab these versions to replay some classics from their childhood, and I already feel for them when that wave of disappointment hits. But truth be told, I feel worse for people hoping to finally give the series a try now that the entire collection is on a mobile, family-first platform. If that describes you, and you’ve been waiting for this moment to finally dive into Kingdom Hearts: Keep waiting.
    • 83 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Strange Horticulture is, appropriately, a strange game, one of those simple premises that balances intrigue, sense of place, and puzzles in a satisfying, tactile way. It’s so easy to become engrossed in this world, to become obsessed with the litany of beautiful, exotic, and sometimes dangerous plants that line the walls of my shop. And it’s already one of my favorite games this year.
    • 86 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    It’s the equivalent of walking into a Games Workshop for the first time as a child and having your eyes roll back into your head from the sheer awe of the place. A thousand boxes, a hundred armies, dozens and dozens of different little bits and bobs. A whole wall of rulebooks! It’s not the most understated of hobbies; and there’s never been anything subtle about a 12-inch figurine that’ll set you back 80 quid. It’s rampant maximalism, is what it is, but it’s also bloody good fun. And it’s hard to imagine a better video game translation of Warhammer Fantasy and all of its large-scale mayhem than this weird, sprawling, endlessly fascinating thing they’ve dubbed Total War: Warhammer 3. And to think, at some point, Creative Assembly will release a brand new “Immortal Empires” campaign, which will feature all three maps and every faction from all three games, all twisting and turning in on themselves and curling at the corners of the world. Now that sounds like Chaos.
    • 88 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    In the end, this is Aloy’s story: She continues to be a headstrong protagonist, and I say that admiringly. In Forbidden West, she takes no sh*t — but she also learns valuable lessons about accepting help, and about acknowledging the grief that comes from growing up as an outcast. She goes to bat for the people she cares about. Forbidden West homes in on the contrast between her convictions and those of Dr. Elisabet Sobeck, the creator of the Zero Dawn project that set the whole series in motion, and the character from whom Aloy was cloned. Where Sobeck took the destruction of humanity as an assumption, and worked to repopulate the Earth, Aloy fights for the survival of those who are alive today. Even as the story throws in twists and additional characters that alter the scope of the threat she’s up against, her steadfast resolve remains. Getting to play as her — in such a beautiful and densely packed world — is a journey I won’t walk away from anytime soon.
    • tbd Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Vampire Survivors is still in early access, of course, so one hopes that more depth and variety are on the way. The important stuff, though — that core blend of roguelike and bullet hell shoot-em-up — is already beyond solid. With a bit more meat on the bone, Vampire Survivors could be ready to take its place among Dead Cells, Hades and the other greats that preceded it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Sifu is incredibly frustrating because beneath all of its messy, clunky contrivances, there is a fantastic action game that I really, really want to play. But Sifu can’t get out of its own way, and its high-concept ambitions spoil its fundamental pleasures.
    • 87 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    That whimsy never loses its appeal or delight, even as I’m wall-riding myself into gaps or wiping out down sets of stairs. Instead, it amplifies the joy and generosity of a world built on an earnest love of skateboarding. [Polygon Recommends]
    • 76 Metascore
    • Critic Score
    Dying Light 2’s appeal is, ultimately, more game than story. Perhaps Techland’s developers were presented with their own vexing, profoundly consequential choice, where they had to choose to save one structural component or the other. If so, they picked correctly. This is a video game, after all, and a well-balanced combat system, plus exhilarating parkour with effortless contextual moves, can save even the weakest story. Vice versa seems impossible.

Top Trailers